Tagged: young people

Half of Newcastle youngsters fear they are unemployable

Half of young people in Newcastle feel they are ‘unemployable’ a leading charity has revealed.

A poll carried out by Action for Children has revealed 49% of 15 to 26-year-olds in the city feel they are unemployable while one in seven of the 2,000 people surveyed believe they can never have the career they want.

A quarter of young people said the job market was too competitive and there are too few jobs while an astounding 38% of young people said when applying for jobs in the past they felt they received no feedback or reply to their application.

> Only 38% ?  From personal experience I might have expected the figure to be in the 80s or 90% region.

Carol Iddon, Action for Children’s director of children’s services across the North of England, said:

“A job is more than just ‘what you do’, it is a part of who you are and gives people a sense of worth.

“Young people across Newcastle have told us they don’t feel employable, and feel uncertain, lack confidence and are not getting the support and advice they need. Those that Action for Children supports have the additional burden of coping with turbulent, often traumatic lives. For them, the risk of unemployment and the financial, social and emotional problems that often come with it are even greater.”

Now Action for Children, in partnership with Barclays, has launched ‘Skills for Success’, an ambitious nationwide project that aims to equip young people with the basic skills and knowledge to help them into employment or training. Following a successful pilot, the programme of workshops and drop-in advice services is aiming to help 22,000 young people already supported by the charity’s projects over a 13-month period.

Ms Iddon added:

“Giving the most vulnerable young people the right support and advice to help them get on the job ladder is vital, and with our new programme, Skills for Success, we hope to be able to help thousands of youngsters over the coming year.”

The charity works with some of the country’s most vulnerable young people including those in care, not in employment, education or training (NEET) and young carers.

Kathleen Britain, head of UK community investment at Barclays, said:

“Our insights show that young people are daunted by the competitiveness of today’s job market and struggle to find the right support, career advice and mentoring to move forward.

“That’s why we are committed to equipping the next generation with the training they need to build a brighter future for themselves and their families through the Skills for Success programme.”

> Or will it be yet another “rewrite your CV our way – it’ll look just like every other version of your CV you’ve had done on courses, but it means we get paid, and that’s the main thing.”

Sorry – feeling cynical today.

Source – Newcastle Evening Chronicle,  20 Apr 2015

South Tyneside : Homelessness among young is getting worse

Homelessness among young people in South Tyneside is getting worse, a borough charity boss warned today.

Figures released by the South Tyneside Churches Key Project show that the number of local young people presenting themselves to the charity as homeless every month has risen from 20 to 30 to between 30 and 50.

Controversial welfare reforms, including the so-called ‘bedroom tax’, have been blamed for some of the recent sharp rise in local homelessness among young people aged 16 to 25.

The group say more young people are also now relying on emergency food packs to get by.

Key Project chief officer Jean Burnside said: “There is no doubt that homelessness among young people is increasing.

“There are a number of reasons for this: shortage of suitable accommodation for young people, the impact of welfare reforms, particularly the so-called ‘bedroom tax,’ the increase in sanctions and a harsher regime.”

She added: “Debt is another major factor, which impacts on people becoming homeless and relationship breakdown is still the most common reason for young people having no home.

“We have also provided a record number of emergency food packs to young people in need – 380 in the year 2013/14, compared with 247 in 2012/13 and 165 in 2011/12.

“The demand for our services is increasing at the same time that the budget is decreasing.”

KEY Project say there has been an increase in the number of young people under 25 who present as homeless.

Between January 31 2014 and June 20 2014, 150 young people presented as homeless.

Out of 150, 96 of these were male and 54 female.

A further 50 vulnerable young people presented themselves as homeless between June 24 and August 15.

Miss Burnside added: “Initially, we had between 20 and 30 young people present themselves as homeless each month.

“This has increased to between 30 and 50 each month and the age is getting younger.”

The issue has been highlighted ahead of KEY’s annual general meeting on October 10, where the guest speaker will be South Shields MP Emma Lewell-Buck.

The AGM will be held at the Salvation Army Citadel, in Wawn Street, South Shields, on Friday, October 10, at 11am.

Miss Burnside added: “We are delighted that our speaker this year will be Emma Lewell-Buck.

“Since Emma’s election she has campaigned on a number of issues, including opposing the ‘bedroom tax’, calling for action on the cost of living crisis and reform of child protection.”

Source –  Shields Gazette,   02 Oct 2014

The young and unemployed invite David Cameron to the region to see what it is really like

Prime Minister David Cameron has been given an open invite to visit the region’s young unemployed to stop him labelling them benefits scroungers.

The Tory leader announced plans to ‘combat’ youth unemployment by stopping benefits after six months for those aged 18 to 21 to wean them off a life of ‘dependency’.

While it played well to the gallery at the Conservative party conference, it left young people at the sharp end angry at how it seems to portray them.

Katie McLaren, 21, graduated with a degree in Performing Arts three months ago from Northumbria University and has still to find work.

I’m trying to get on the employment ladder, be an adult, but there aren’t a lot of work opportunities out there,” she said. “Believe me I’m trying.

Why doesn’t he speak to the young unemployed to find out what the situation is like? I think there’s a lack of understanding between the south and the north as well as politicians with the people they are supposed to represent. If he wants to come up here he is more than welcome.”

The region has one of the worst jobless rates for young people in the UK, running at 25% or about one in four.

And the figure for all ages in the North East is about 10%, the worst in the UK by a considerable margin.

Neil Burke of Youth Focus North East, a charity which aims to improve the life of young people across the region, said: “There might be lots of jobs in London but there aren’t loads of jobs up here, as the figures show.”

Speaking about Mr Cameron’s proposal, he said: “What about young people who have come from vulnerable circumstances?

“They can be socially isolated and getting them out of the house to train them can take four months which could be great work. And then have them find work in two months?

“It’s a one-size fits all policy. Many might have been let down by the education system and haven’t left school with the skills to get a job and sometimes it can take more than six months to get them ready for work. It seems to me the six month figure has just been plucked out of the air.”

Under the plan, unemployed 18 to 21 year olds will be given six months to find work or training before their jobseekers allowance (JSA) is withdrawn, and replaced with a ‘Youth Allowance’ which would be set at the same level as JSA, £57.35.

This would be time-limited of six months, after which young people will have to take an apprenticeship, a traineeship or do community work – such as cleaning up local parks – to earn their benefits.

Young mum Amy Ormston, 22, from Gateshead dropped out of college to have daughter Mya. She is now training to become cabin crew.

She said: “I don’t agree with the plans to cut benefits at all. If it happened to me how would I be able to feed Mya?

“There aren’t jobs but there is plenty of voluntary work going round – how many of those lead to a permanent job?

“He is tarring young people with the same brush. Stigmatising them as if all we want to do is just to be on benefits.”

Lizzie Crowley of the Work Foundation, a not-for-profit organisation providing research on work, said similar schemes have been introduced in the US and Australia and have not been successful – unless the intention was to save money on benefits payments.

She said: “People have just left the system before the time period is up. It can lead to homelessness or relying on your parents even more. That’s people who have stable family relations.”

Katie said she has family to go back to in Hartlepool. However she added: “I don’t think that would be fair on them and I’d feel a failure if I had to.”

Source –  Newcastle Evening Chronicle,  01 Oct 2014

Is this the worst time ever to be young?

Successive Government policies that unfairly target the young are making this the worst time to grow up in decades, campaigners say.

High levels of youth unemployment, increased university tuition fees and the difficulty of getting a mortgage have been cited as problems affecting young people, along with changes to the benefit system and cuts to youth support services.

People working with young people in the North East say they are being disproportionately targeted in the Government austerity cuts so that Ministers can protect older people who are statistically more likely to vote.

And there have been warnings that the situation is creating a “a generation without hope” who do not feel part of society.

Liz Emerson, co-founder of the Intergenerational Foundation, a national charity set up to ensure fairness between the generations, said: “This is the first period in recent history where children will have worst standards of living than their parents and their grandparents.

Successive Governments have put the interests of older generations before the interests of younger ones. They’ve taken away the EMA, they’ve taken away Sure Start schemes for young people, they’re taking away their travel concessions.”

Concerns about the young being unfairly targeted came earlier this month when Chancellor George Osborne signalled benefit cuts for the under-26s just a day after Prime Minister David Cameron said he would “triple lock” the state pension, which accounts for half of all welfare spending.

Jeff Hurst, who runs the Newcastle YMCA and is vice-chair of the city’s children’s trust board, said: “I was brought up in a generation where anything was possible and everything was positive. Now we are creating a generation without hope.

“What I see is fantastic young people who are motivated, who are clever, who are innovative who are able, but who are very frustrated.”

Mr Hurst said the combined effect of higher pension ages, more graduates, and a flood of axed public sector workers were squeezing the young out of the labour market until far into their twenties.

The situation is particularly acute in the North East, which has the highest rate of youth unemployment at nearly 24% and the worst score of any region on the Intergenerational Foundation’s age fairness index.

Geoff Mount of the charity Barnados, which has a number of youth projects in the region, said: “Times are tough for young people. Funding for courses is being cut, young people now are having to take out loans, and EMA has been taken away. We’ve got a bursary scheme in place but that doesn’t meet in my opinion the needs of those young people in greatest financial need. There are fewer job opportunities out there than ever before.”

Workers also cited a squeeze on housing, with last week’s ONS figures showing a quarter of 34-year-olds are now living with their parents.

The number of “boomerang children” has soared by 25% in the last 17 years, despite the youth population remaining the same, with under-24s in the North East the least likely in the country to have a mortgage.

Source – Newcastle Journal, 27 Jan 2014

DWP Helps Young People Work In Sex Shops And Porn Films.. But Not As A Cat Fighter

The lovely wibbly wobbly old lady

Reposted from Huffington Post

 

 

The government is keen to get young people into work, even if it involves working on a porn film set or in a sex shop, according to official guidance issued by Iain Duncan Smith’s Department for Work and Pensions.

However employers looking to hire young people as full-time strippograms, topless maids, mud wrestlers or “cat fighters”, will not get any government help in the form of a £2,275 wage subsidy. Also, any work in the porn industry will only go as far as being behind the camera rather than performing.

Those looking to take on young unemployed people for other permanent positions can be eligible for a £2,275 “wage incentive” under the government’s “Youth Contract”.The government is offering a £1,137.50 wage subsidy for those taken on for part-time work.

The following jobs “of a sexual nature” will not be get any government subsidy…

View original post 242 more words

Youth Unemployment & Mental Illness In North East

More than one in five young people in the North East have experienced symptoms of mental illness as a direct result of unemployment, a new report warns today.

The Prince’s Trust Macquarie Youth Index paints a bleak picture of young people’s mental health and wellbeing in the region, with the report finding that young people who are long-term unemployed are more than twice as likely as their peers to believe they have nothing to live for.

The report comes at a time when Newcastle has seen a 279% increase in the number of young people claiming benefits for more than six months since the beginning of the recession.

Jonathan Townsend, Northern regional director of The Prince’s Trust, said: “Unemployment is proven to cause devastating, long-lasting mental health problems among young people. Thousands wake up every day believing that life isn’t worth living, after struggling for years in the dole queue.

“Here in Newcastle, 795 young people are facing long-term unemployment and there is a real danger that these young people will become hopeless, as well as jobless.

“Our research highlights that unemployed young people are significantly less likely to ask for help if they are struggling to cope. Our message to them is this: organisations like The Prince’s Trust are supporting young people like you every day, helping them back into work, education or training. You are not alone and you need not struggle alone.”

The Prince’s Trust, which works to help young people looking for work, last year worked with 426 disadvantaged young people across Newcastle. It also has a centre in Benwell, in the city’s West End. The charity’s survey found that nearly a third of young people from the city said they “always” or “often” feel down or depressed with the report showing that long-term unemployed people are significantly more likely to feel this way.

One in four young people locally admitted they feel like a “waste of space” – higher than the national average – with the report finding that the long-term unemployed are more than twice as likely to feel this way.

> I wonder why that is ? Just a wild guess, but you dont think it might have something to do with the relentless “skivers not strivers” propaganda channelled through the media direct from the government ? 

Not to mention the treatment handed out by the DWP through its Jobcentres, Work Programme, etc ?

All the stupid hoops you have to jump through, with the possibility of a sanction if you slip up, however trivially ?

It’s enough to unhinge the sanest at the best of times.

The Prince’s Trust is now calling for urgent support from the Government, health agencies and employers to fund its work with long-term unemployed young people battling mental health issues.

Shirley Cramer, chief executive of the Royal Society for Public Health, said: “This research proves that unemployment is a public health issue. It is one that must be tackled urgently and it is essential that youth unemployment is added to the public health agenda.

“Unemployed young people are struggling in many aspects of their lives, from their mental health and wellbeing to their relationships and their qualifications and we must act quickly to end this.”

> Well, maybe they could take a lot of the pressure off by just acting in a humane way, and stop treating the unemployed (of any age) as an enemy that must be crushed at all costs. 

Stop sanctions, start admitting that we are an area of high unemployment and probably always will be…and most of all stop the vile media propaganda.

All easy to do and would cost very little.  But, conspiracy theories notwithstanding, I’m starting to think that the government actually want things the way they are. They have absolutely no interest in improving life for the poorer sections of society.

And they keep getting away with it, so why does anyone think they’ll stop ?

Source – Newcastle Journal, 02 Jan 2014