Tagged: Wokingham

Average Teesside home is worth £25k LESS than it was five years ago

The average homeowner in parts of Teesside has lost £25,000 off the value of their house since the coalition came to power in 2010 – while prices in London have soared.

Exclusive analysis of Land Registry data show the average house price in Redcar and Cleveland has dropped by 21.3% since May 2010, the date of the last election.

The average price is now £92,785 – or £25,134 LESS than it was then.

Only two places in the country – Merthyr Tydfil (down 27.1%) and Blackpool (down 24.9%) – have seen a bigger percentage fall.

In Middlesbrough, prices are down 6.6% since May 2010.

That means the average property is worth £5,904 less now than then.

And Stockton-on-Tees has seen a 2.6% fall, equivalent to £2,944.

Across England and Wales as a whole, house prices have actually gone up by 10.8% since May 2010, with the average property worth £17,595 more than it was then.

Across England and Wales as a whole, house prices have risen by 10.8% since May 2010.

The biggest increases have all been in London – with the 29 top-rising areas all in the capital.

Top of the list is Hackney, where house prices are up 76.3%.

The average house is now worth £634,045 – or £274,491 more than it was five years ago.

In the City of Westminster, meanwhile, the average price is up £464,941 from £610,767 to £1.07m.

When London is taken out of the equation, Tory-run areas seem to have done markedly better than those controlled by other parties.

Ten of the 20 ‘non-London’ areas that have seen the biggest rises are held by the Conservatives, with nine in no overall political control and just one – Slough – held by Labour.

Tory Wokingham (up 25.7%), Hertfordshire (up 24.6%) and Surrey (up 24.6%) have seen the biggest rises outside London.

By contrast 19 of the 20 areas to have seen the biggest falls in house prices are run by Labour.

The only one that isn’t is Lancashire (down 13.6%) – which is in no overall control.

Source – Middlesbrough Gazette, 13 Apr 2015

North East has lowest healthy life expectancy in country

Men and women in the North-East have the lowest healthy life expectancy in the country, according to official new figures.

A statistical bulletin produced by the Office for National Statistics highlights the continuing North-South divide in health life expectancy.

Men born in the North-East had a life expectancy of 77.8 years, slightly higher than the North-West, but the lowest healthy life expectancy of 59.5 years.

Women from the North-East also finished at the bottom of the pile for life expectancy – 81.6 years – and last among the English regions for healthy life expectancy – 60.1 years.

The two areas where men and women could expect to have the longest expectancy of healthy living were in Richmond upon Thames and Wokingham in the affluent South-East of England.

Men born in Richmond upon Thames could expect to enjoy a healthy living expectancy of 70 years while women born in Wokingham could expect to live healthily for 71 years.

Within the North-East Darlington men had the longest healthy life expectancy of 64 years with Northumberland just behind with 62.7.

The shortest healthy life expectancy within the region for men was in Sunderland where average healthy life expectancy is 55 years.

 Women born in Darlington also had the longest healthy life expectancy in the region – 63 years – while women from Sunderland had the shortest healthy life expectancy in the region – 58.4 years.
Source –  Northern Echo, 20 July 2014

Government Ministers Accused Of Waging War On North East

Ministers have been accused of declaring “war” on the North East as MPs and council leaders gathered at Westminster to plan their fight-back against funding cuts.

> Well it’s taken them long enough ! Have they only just noticed what’s been going on under their noses ?

The region’s Labour politicians warned the debate about funding and grants obscured the real impact of cuts, which was worse public services and the prospect of councils running out of money.

Paul Watson, leader of Sunderland Council, said families in the North East would receive poorer police and fire services than those in wealthier parts of the country.

And the region’s politicians accused the Government of quietly scrapping the long-accepted convention that funding was allocated in part on the basis of need – so areas with higher levels of poverty, a higher proportion of older folk a low skills base or other pressing needs were given the cash they needed.

The change means a council like Newcastle is facing budget cuts while those in much wealthier areas are enjoying increases in funding.

The warnings were issued as council leaders delivered a presentation to MPs in a Commons committee room at Westminster, following a meeting with Local Government Minister Brandon Lewis.

> And they all said: “Bugger me, we had no idea this was going on. When did this start, then ?”

GatesheadMP Ian Mearns told the gathering: “There is a war being fought against our communities and it is being inflicted on us in the most ruthless fashion I can remember in my 30 years in politics.”

North Durham MP Kevan Jones added: “This is a war. They know exactly what they are doing. They are diverting money from our areas to areas in the south.”

A presentation produced by the Association of North East Councils (ANEC) warned that cuts in council budgets in the North East amounted to £467 for every household between 2010 and 2016 – compared to just £105 in the South East.

The discrepancy is partly a result of the Government abandoning the principle of funding based on “need”, which traditionally meant some councils received more than others.

A higher proportion of the North East’s population is elderly than the national average. The region also has more adults who need social care and long-term unemployment, as well as more children in care, all of which would traditionally have meant councils received higher funding.

But ANEC estimates that by 2019-20, Newcastle City Council’s spending power per household will be equal to the money available to a council in a wealthy areas such as Wokingham, in Berkshire.

Meanwhile, Newcastle North MP Catherine McKinnell, has revealed that a poll of her constituents shows that more than 90% of respondents expect their standard of living to get worse or stay the same over the next three years.

The survey on her website found that 79% of respondents were concerned by energy bills, 56% by food prices and 39% with the cost of transport.

> So now our Labour representives finally seem to have caught on to what’s going down. Question is, what are they going to actually do about it ?

Source – Newcastle Journal, 16 Jan 2014