Tagged: voters

Candidates bemoan poor turnout in Washington East by-election

Candidates in the Washington East by-election have criticised voters who stayed at home instead of heading to the polling stations.

Labour’s Tony Taylor was voted onto to the seat vacated by disgraced party colleague Neville Padgett in the Sunderland City Council by-election.

But just 23.4 per cent turned out to vote – 2,026 people out of a total electorate of 8,672.

Coun Taylor took home 775 votes, ahead of the runner-up, Conservative Hilary Johnson, at 595 votes.

 

Conservative Hilary Johnson said:

“We did better than we did last time, we increased our share, we had a four per cent swing. But all I really want to say is that I was so disappointed with the turn-out – 23.4 per cent is pathetic. Less than 400 voted on the day in the polling stations.” 

UKIP’s Alistair Baxter, said:

“It was disappointing. I was hoping to be in second.

“It was alarming that so few people even bothered, 75 per cent didn’t do anything. That really questions the validity of the whole process.”

> The consensus seems to be that the voters were pathetic, then. 

It probably wouldn’t occur to those candidates that the fault may lie with them, that the majority may think that they are just not worth turning out for.

Source –  Sunderland Echo,  13 Dec 2014

 

 

Look Out Hartlepool ! UKIP Want You

> Evidently not having lost heart at their candidates piss-poor showing in the Yarm election last week, UKIP now have their sights on Hartlepool (insert monkey joke of your choice here).

General Election planners at UKIP have decided Hartlepool is their best chance in the region, with a relatively strong local branch helping pave the way for an election push.

Labour’s Iain Wright holds the seat with a majority of 5,509, down from the days of Peter Mandelson and a 14,000 strong majority. Back in 2010 UKIP took just 7% of the vote.

But, Nigel Farage said, after recent success in the South Shields by-election, where the party came second despite never standing there before, there would be a General Election rethink after this May’s Euro polls.

It was revealed last month how new academic research suggests Labour’s working class vote is at risk of moving away from an increasingly middle class Labour party, with UKIP making clear they now want to take left-wing voters across the North.

Mr Farage, who was in Gateshead last week, claimed that even an area with as many safe seats as the North was not beyond their reach.

“It’s a Labour heartland, but you know what, we’re having a go,” he said. “Let’s be honest. We are at a later stage in our development in the North East, compared to, say, the East of England.

“That’s because we didn’t quite get over the line in 2009, 15.4% in those elections. Let’s see where we are after these elections.

“We’re fighting more than 100 local election seats, and if, if, we start to win in those we suddenly have a base to build on.

“In South Shields we came second, and it showed how much Labour hate us in the North East. They hate us here, they are scared, they know they represent a different set of interests to the old Labour party.

“We will not win where Labour has a massive majority, but we can find marginals or other seats where we can make a difference.

“Hartlepool is very, very interesting. Watch Hartlepool. It is an interesting seat for us in 2015.

“We have a base there, it is our longest established branch in the North East.

“The North East is our fastest growing membership area, and if I had to pick I’d say Hartlepool was an area where we can make a substantial impact.

“We will have to look hard after the elections at what our targets will be in 2015, but Hartlepool is very interesting to us.”

Last night leading Teesside MP Tom Blenkinsop ( Middlesbrough South and East Cleveland) said UKIP would struggle to convince voters in the North to back Mr Farage’s right-wing policies.

> Sadly, I’m not so sure. Many life-long Labour supporters I’ve met espouse personal views that would place them well to the right of UKIP. They only vote Labour because they always have, and their fathers before them, etc – there’s very little innovative thinking or grasp of political theory. It’s a classic case of double-think. And OAPs are often the worst – they’ve got theirs, now they want to pull the ladder up behind them.

The Labour MP said: “Nigel Farage says he’s ‘the only politician keeping the flame of Thatcherism alive’.

“He should tell that to the steel workers of Hartlepool and the rest of Teesside that numbered 25,000 in 1987, and only numbered 5,000 by 1992.

“Or maybe the mining communities of County Durham and Northumberland.

“If you want to know about UKIP, look at how Farage has employed Neil Hamilton in a senior party role, a man who took brown paper envelopes full of cash to ask questions in parliament.

“Farage supports privatising the NHS. He wants to cut maternity rights for women, and he wants to privatise chunks of our education system.

“He sounds like a Thatcherite Tory, he looks like a Thatcherite Tory and of course he tried six times previously to be a Thatcherite Tory MP.

“I’m very sure that firms like TATA, Nissan and Hitachi would be more than a little bit concerned at a follower of Farage’s getting into any position of representation in the North East.”

Source – Newcastle Evening Chronicle  27 April 2014

Tories deny they have abandoned the North East

The Conservatives have said they will target working class Northern voters even as austerity measures continue.

Tory party chairman Grant Shapps hit back at claims the party had “given up on the North” and insisted tomorrow’s Budget will be good news for the region.

With a strong UKIP vote predicted in the upcoming European elections, the party is still way behind any signs of a revived North East presence.

Mr Shapps said he was confident the party could fight back in the region.

He said: “I recognise that we have a long way to go, we took over a recession from the last Government, there was no double dip recession.

“Now there are in the North East 17,000 more people in a job than there were.

> 15,000 of them are self-employed leaflet distributors….

There is just the start of the recovery. I know the North East had some big issues to deal with, the reliance on the public sector, but it is showing good signs.”

He admitted though that there was little hope in sight of an end to Government spending cuts.

“What we need to do now is not create more Government jobs but help create more private sector jobs,” he said.

“There is no short cut. If you believe you can somehow just raise taxes and spend money on jobs we know from years of experience that it just does not work.

“We have come this far, it has been difficult and painful, I totally get that. But what we do not want to do is hand the car keys back to the people who crashed this economy in the first place.”

> No chance of that, they never gave up possession of the car keys in the first place… just got someone else to take the points on their licence (something certain Lib Dems, for example, know all about).

Mr Shapps faces a difficult task turning that economic message into votes in the North East, with a 10% unemployment rate standing as the UK’s highest.

Asked if he feared losing out to UKIP in the region despite the Budget message, Mr Shapps said: “If voters want a referendum the last thing they should do is vote UKIP, because that will just hand power to Labour, and then you will never get what you want.”

Over the weekend Labour had attacked the Tories record in the North, saying it had abandoned the region.

Asked if he thought this was true, Mr Shapps said: “Absolutely not, the North has been the engine of the economy and I think we will see that again in the North, and Conservatives are going to be a part of that.”

Source – Newcastle Journal,  18 March 2014

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