Tagged: Unite

How many Cabinet members would have failed the trade union ballot test?

The lovely wibbly wobbly old lady

Reposted from Union Solidarity International

The list of Cabinet members who failed to secure 40% of the vote. They would not have been elected had the same criteria been imposed as strike ballots

Half the members of the new Tory Cabinet were elected on less than 40% of the electorate – failing the government’s own trade union legitimacy test.

Business Secretary Sajid Javid, himself elected by 38.3% of the electorate, yesterday announced new rules concerning strike ballots.

The proposal is that a ballot result would only be valid if: (1) at least 50% of members vote in them and (2) at least 40% of all members vote to support the action.

Therefore, the bare minimum will be 80% yes with a 50% turnout. meaning trade union strike ballots would no longer be declared by a simple majority, but would only become valid if 40% of members voted in them.

But…

View original post 735 more words

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McCluskey tops Miners Gala bill – but ‘Red Ed’ not invited

Union chiefs Len McCluskey and Matt Wrack and left-wing author Owen Jones will top the bill at this year’s Durham Miners’ Gala.

The general secretaries of Unite and the Fire Brigades’ Union (FBU) will be joined by the firebrand Guardian columnist on the Durham Racecourse speakers’ stage at Europe’s biggest trade union event on Sunday, July 11.

Durham Miners’ Association secretary Dave Hopper will also introduce Steve Murphy from UCATT, John McDonald from ASLEF and Chris Keates from the NASUWT.

However, Ed Miliband will be absent – organisers having decided not to invite the Labour leader.

Mr Miliband, who claimed the Labour leadership ahead of his brother David with strong union backing, became the first party boss to address the Gala since Neil Kinnock when he travelled to Durham in 2012, but has not returned since.

Tens of thousands of people are expected to turn out for the 131st Gala, as dozens of brass and bagpipe bands march union and colliery banners through Durham City’s historic streets past dignitaries watching from the first floor balcony of the Royal County Hotel and to the Racecourse where, in addition to the political speeches which start at about 1pm, there will be family entertainment, campaign stalls and more.

 The traditional blessing of the banners service will take place in Durham Cathedral.

Mr Hopper said he was very pleased with the speakers line-up.

The outcome of this week’s General Election is bound to be the central theme of the speeches; and Mr Hopper said he could not see Labour winning.

The Scottish girl (Scottish National Party leader Nicola Sturgeon) has run rings around them.

“Miliband hasn’t come across very well. She’s putting him on the spot every time,” he said.

Last year’s Gala had a mournful feel, as guests paid tribute to the late Labour grandee Tony Benn and union leader Bob Crow.

On Gala day, the centre of Durham will be closed to traffic from 7am. Visitors are encouraged to use park and ride buses.

There is an ongoing appeal to support the continuation of the Gala. Supporters are invited to become a Friend of the event, for a minimum fee of £2 a month. For more information, visit friendsofdurhamminersgala.org

> Interesting developments ?  Are the decision not to invite Miliband, and Dave Hopper’s comments about Labour’s chances the beginnings of a move away from the Labour Party ? 

Source –  Durham Times, 04 May 2015

Hundreds join Tyne and Wear May Day march and Rally in Newcastle

Around 300 people took part in the Tyne and Wear May Day March and Rally in Newcastle on Saturday.

The event coincided with the 125th anniversary of the very first workers’ international May Day celebrations.

Back in 1890, the international demand was for an eight-hour maximum to the working day. This call united workers in the United States, Britain, France, Belgium, Germany, Austria and many other countries.

One of the organisers of the Tyneside event, Martin Levy, said:

“There’s a lot of people on zero hours contracts today who would love to get the chance to work eight hours.”

“The march is as relevant today as it was 125 years ago. It’s very important as a statement of the principles of the Trade Union and Labour movement – solidarity, fighting inequality and fighting for social justice.

“These issues don’t just go away.”

Speakers at the event included Christine Payne, general secretary of actors’ union Equity; Ian Mearns, Labour’s candidate for the Gateshead constituency at the forthcoming general election and Andrew Murray, chief of staff of Unite the Union and deputy president of the Stop the War Coalition.

Professor Manuel Hassassian, Palestinian Ambassador to the United Kingdom, had been due to speak but had to cancel at the last minute.

His place on the platform was taken by Ann Schofield of the Tyneside Palestinian Solidarity Campaign.

Those taking part assembled at Princess Square then walked along Northumberland Street and then past St Thomas’s Church towards Exhibition Park, where the rally was held.

The Tyne and Wear May Day March, at Exhibition Park in Newcastle 

Music on the march was provided by the Backworth Colliery Band, while local musicians DrumDin (OK) and The Backyard Rhythm Orchestra performed at the rally.

Mr Levy added:

“This 125th anniversary of the very first workers’ May Day was an opportunity to make clear our opposition to austerity and privatisation, and to express solidarity with all those struggling for a better world, particularly the people of Palestine.”

Source – Newcastle Evening Chronicle,  02 May 2015

Redcar : Sita denies low pay claims as protesters gather

Protest march through Redcar against Sita's employment policies at its new Wilton site
Protest march through Redcar against Sita’s employment policies at its new Wilton site

Hundreds of protesters gathered in Redcar to voice concerns over jobs at a major new power plant.

Representatives from the Unite, GMB and UCATT unions protested in Redcar town centre.

It followed previous protests at the Wilton International Site near Redcar over the rate of pay given to foreign workers at the new £250m Sita facility.

Concerns have also been raised that the company was recruiting predominantly from overseas and was not adhering to nationally agreed terms and conditions.

Michael Blench, an officer for the GMB, said:

“The main reason for today is to keep up the pressure on Sita and Sembcorp, who are the landlords of the site.”

 

He added: “The ideal outcome from my point of view is that the site will be finished with the workforce that is there and that what we are doing sends a message.

“This situation hasn’t happened in the way we would have liked but the important thing is that if Sita ever came back to this area, they know our position from the start.

“This is a message for the future.”

Steve Cason, North-east regional officer for construction at Unite, added: “All we want to see is equality and fairness across the board.”

But Sita has denied claims made by the protesters and says it is paying the correct, nationally agreed rates to its employees.

A spokesman for the company said:

“Allegations continue to be made about the employment of foreign workers at the Wilton 11 construction site, including claims about low rates of pay and accommodation allowances.

“We continue to refute all of these allegations and there’s no evidence to support any of these claims.”

He added:

“Since construction began, a significant proportion of workers on site have been from the local area and we have made significant efforts to try and promote job opportunities to local workers. This included the organisation of a jobs fair at Redcar and Cleveland College on Thursday 19 February, to which 774 people attended.

“However, it is still necessary for a proportion of workers on site to be from wider European Union member states and it would be difficult to deliver a project of this nature without them.

“Energy-from-waste facilities require a great deal of specialist equipment which has had to be sourced from within the wider European Union. These elements are of a bespoke and sophisticated nature, meaning that some of our suppliers choose to use their own specialist and experienced workforce when they are fitted.

“All workers on site, regardless of their nationality, are employed because of their individual skills and abilities. They have a legal entitlement to work in the UK and contribute to the local economy while they are here, furthermore there is no substance to allegations that they are employed on site as a means of sourcing cheap labour.”

Source – Middlesbrough Evening Gazette, 18 Apr 2015

RMT Union President: Why I’m standing for the Greens in Redcar

The president of a transport union with roots in the Labour Party will contest a North seat for the Greens.

Peter Pinkney, the highest ranking layperson of the RMT Union, will campaign against Ed Miliband’s party in Redcar, claiming: “The party of the left is now the Green Party.”

The union boss also brands Labour “a sort of reddish Conservative Party” and accuses MPs of betraying working people.

The dramatic political move by the ex-TUC General Council member threatens to derail Labour’s campaign in one of its top target seats.

The RMT boss also revealed the union has donated £7,000 to Caroline Lucas, the country’s only Green MP, after the Greens were supportive of plans to renationalise the railways.

Mr Pinkney said:

“Labour is no longer the working class party. They have betrayed us time and time again. They should remember that it was the unions who formed the ‘party of labour’ not deny our links.

“The radical Labour Party of 1945 is long gone. No longer do they champion nationalisation, social housing, the NHS, education etc, they are a sort of reddish Conservative Party.

“In my opinion the party of the left is now the Green Party.”

Labour hit back last night, saying a vote for the Green Party is a vote for the Tories.

> This is the kind of stupid comment that makes me even less likely to vote Labour.

It’d obviously be a vote against Labour, Tories and Lib Dems… because we have no belief in any of them anymore.

The move underlines a deepening fracture in the relationship between Labour and the RMT.

Predecessors to the RMT were among the unions which founded Labour back in 1899. But after 105 years of history the RMT was disaffiliated by Labour in 2004, after the union rejected an ultimatum to stop supporting the Scottish Socialist Party.

Former General Secretary Bob Crow publicly slammed Labour, which was then led by Tony Blair, for a failure to support members.

The deadlock continued until the 2012 Durham Miners’ Gala, when the then Deputy Chairman of the Labour Party, Tom Watson,  seemed to offer the RMT an olive branch.

He said: “We need the RMT and the FBU back inside the Labour Party – a house divided cannot stand.”

But Mr Pinkney said three months after Bob Crow died the union voted to sever ties with Labour permanently – and today rules out any future affiliation.

“That is not going to happen,” he said.

“It was a unanimous decision to disaffiliate with Labour and our members would never want to go back.

“If Ed Miliband is [more supportive of unions] then he is doing a strange impression of it. He might say that he is to his paymasters at Unite and GMB, who make hefty donations, but our members will not affiliate to Labour or any other party ever again.

“The press calling him ‘Red Ed’ is a joke. A minimum of 75% of people want to see the railways renationalised. He has never once said he would take the railways back into public hands – not even East Coast.”

Labour has named Redcar in its top 100 seats to win in May and has high hopes for candidate Anna Turley.

Vera Baird lost the seat to Lib Dem Ian Swales in 2010 in what was the highest swing against Labour in the wake of the closure of the Teesside Steelworks.

A poll by Lord Ashcroft in September put Labour on 44%, Lib Dems on 18%, Ukip on 23%, the Tories on 12% and the Greens on just 2%.

A Labour Party spokesperson said: “The choice in front of Redcar people in May is between a Tory or a Labour government.

“For all those passionate about the green agenda only Labour has the record and plans to deliver a green government.

“A vote for the Green Party is a vote for David Cameron to carry on hitting the people of Teesside.”

> Well, don’t they have a sense of entitlement ? Only us or them can be in power – its our right. Two sides of the same coin.

The Saltburn-born rail union boss, who is calling for capitalism to be replaced, said he was inspired by the election of the left wing Syriza in Greece.

He said: “We need to look after our elderly, build social housing, repeal anti-trade union laws, scrap bedroom tax, renationalise railways and utilities (and any profit reinvested), but most of all we should give the young hope.

“We are definitely handing on worse conditions than we inherited. My generation should hang our heads in shame for letting this happen. Instead of complaining about young being on streets, and using drugs, we should be asking why.

“Redcar and Cleveland has seen a massive decline in my lifetime. We need proper investment, and not just paper over cracks. I believe the Greens are only large party (as surely they can now claim to be) that wants to put things right.

“I am a left wing socialist, but I am pragmatic. I have seen what Syriza have done, and we can learn from that.”

Source –  Newcastle Evening Chronicle, 07 Feb 2015

Miners, Unions and The Durham Gala

Durham Community Support Centre

Yesterday saw a one day event at Durham that looked at the history and the future of The Durham Miners Gala and the unique characteristics of mining communities.  Unite Community members from Durham and Newcastle attended  and we were joined by a group of people from Recovery Durham .

MG1

The course was lead by Dave Wray and John Stirling – who are both passionate about the subject matter. We started with a fascinating talk from Dave about the history of the Mining banners which, in some cases, came to symbolise the community it was attached to.

Paul, a representative of Friends of The Gala came in to talk about the work he is doing. If you want to become a Friend Of The Gala you can find out more here

MG2

After lunch (another excellent buffet provided by Unite!) the discussion turned to heritage- leading on from the mornings session whereby banners…

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Hartlepool Councillors Call for ban on zero-hours contracts

A group of Hartlepool councillors are calling on the authority to act on zero hours contracts which leave workers open to being exploited.

Hart councillor David Riddle, of the Putting Hartlepool First Party, has submitted a motion to the council for it to lead by example and carry out a review of all staff and contractors who may be employed on the contracts.

Councillor Riddle said:

“The number of people on zero hours contracts has significantly increased in recent years.

“It makes it very difficult for households to plan a budget from month to month or even week to week.

“Families are then faced with impossible choices concerning bills, buying food and just keeping a roof over their heads.”

The union Unite says zero hours contracts are on the rise nationwide having almost doubled in the last five years.

The latest data shows around 1.4 million people are now employed on the contracts, but the union adds the real figure may be up to 2.7 million.

Unite says the contracts mean workers have no guaranteed weekly hours or income, and are only being paid for the hours they do work.

Workers do not get the benefits such as holiday pay, pensions and being free to work for other employers.

Coun Riddle added:

“As a ward councillor, it’s impossible for me to ban zero hour contracts.

“That would be a decision for the Government. However, we in Hartlepool can lead by example and ensure as many people as possible within our town are protected.

“The contracts need to provide more safety and assurance for the employee than is currently the case.”


The motion will be debated by councillors at a Full Council meeting, on Thursday, February 5.

It calls for a review of all Hartlepool council employees, contractors, subcontractors and organisations who have gained council tenders or money who are on zero hours contracts.

The motion also asks the council to implement six key principles within six months.

They include workers not having to be available outside contracted hours, have a right to compensation if shifts are cancelled at short notice and having the right to ask for a minimum amount of work after six months.

Source –  Hartlepool Mail,  30 Jan 2015

MPs urge Miliband to lean further Left in alternative election manifesto

Four North-East Labour MPs have urged Ed Miliband to swing to the Left and rip up his “tragic” commitment to further deep spending cuts.

Grahame Morris (Easington), Ian Mearns (Gateshead), Dave Anderson (Blaydon) and Ian Lavery (Wansbeck) are among 16 rebels issuing the challenge to their leader.

Their alternative election manifesto demands:

* A £30bn investment package – an “alternative way out of endless austerity” – funded either by higher borrowing, the state-owned banks, or a levy on the super-rich.

The MPs call on Mr Miliband to exploit 0.5 per cent interest rates, arguing it would cost just £150m a year to finance the package – which they say would create more than a million jobs, within three years.

Instead, they say: “All three main parties, tragically, seem to agree that deep spending cuts must continue to be made until the structural budget deficit is wiped out in 2019-20.”

* Rail nationalisation, by taking train operating franchises back into public ownership when they expire.

The MPs reject Labour’s plan to allow not-for-profit firms to bid for franchises, condemning it as timid and “wholly unnecessary”.

They claim privatisation costs £1.2bn a year, adding: “Over 80 per cent of the public want the railways re-nationalised, which must include a significant proportion of Tories.”

* Stronger trade union and employment rights, with a return to collective bargaining “as a check against excessive corporate power”.

The alternative manifesto blames the disappearance of union-negotiated agreements for a sharp fall in the share of national income going to salaries and wages – from 65 per cent in 1980, to 53 per cent in 2012.

And it says: “We should therefore actively promote sectoral collective bargaining and strengthen the rights of trade unions to recognition, and of their members to representation.”

The move laid bare how Mr Miliband will struggle to carry his party to make the deep spending cuts planned, even if he wins a small majority in May.

The left-wing group of MPs are keen to take advantage of the rise of the anti-austerity Green Party and of the SNP to push Labour in a more radical direction.

Meanwhile, Len McCluskey, the Unite general secretary, has made repeated threats to establish a new workers’ party if Labour loses after offering a “pale shade of austerity”.

Last year, Mr McCluskey urged the likes of Mr Morris, Mr Mearns and Mr Lavery to “put the brakes” on Ed Miliband if he tries to take Labour to the right

> Even further to the right, I think he means…

It followed the trio’s criticism of Labour support for an overall welfare cap and vote against compulsory unpaid work experience.

Source – Northern Echo,  26 Jan 2015

Gateshead Barbour staff accept new deal from bosses after being re-ballotted

Barbour staff have accepted a new deal from their bosses after being re-balloted on the offer of a shorter working week.

Workers at the clothing firm’s Gateshead-based warehouse went on strike earlier this month over the introduction of a two-shift system.

The industrial action came to an end last week after the company agreed to offer increases in pay and day shift working for those with family and caring responsibilities.

However members of the Unite union were re-balloted on Monday over an offer of a shorter working week.

Unite said its members were concerned about the deal and had proposed staff work for 37.5 hours a week, instead of 39 hours, and bank around 78 hours which would be worked off during the firm’s busiest periods of the year.

However bosses at Barbour said the additional hours offer was never on the table, and union members have now agreed to a 37.5 hour contract, with no additional working during peak times.

Unite regional officer Fazia Hussain-Brown said:

“There was another ballot on a revised offer from the company and members have agreed to a 37.5 hour contract.

“There will be no banked hours which would have been worked during the firm’s busiest period.

“With a heavy heart, our members have decided to work fewer hours and thus have a cut in wages. The members are going to be losing 78 hours worth of payments through the year.”

Brenda Readman-Bell, IT and finance director at the firm, said: “We are pleased the latest ballot of the workforce by the union on a shorter working week has been accepted.

“When this condition was put on the table last week by the union we agreed to incorporate it into the final deal for an acceptance of a two shift system in the warehouse from April 2015.”

Source – Newcastle Evening Chronicle, 19 Jan 2015

Striking Gateshead Barbour workers to vote on new offer from company

Striking workers at a top clothing brand will today vote on whether to continue their walk-out after crunch talks.

Staff at Barbour are in the second week of industrial action in a dispute over contractual changes which would require employees to work more late nights and early mornings as part of a new two shift system.

But yesterday, Acas talks between union chiefs and the firm’s bosses were described as “constructive” and union members will be balloted on a new offer today.

A spokeswoman for Barbour said:

“Following constructive talks at Acas today, Barbour, which has been subject to industrial action by a number of its warehouse staff, has said progress has been made. Union members will be balloted on the offer.

“The need to implement a two shift system in the warehouses reflects the continued growth and expansion of the business.”

The company, which has its headquarters in Barbour House, South Shields, told employees about the shift changes in May last year, affecting three warehouses which employ 180 people.

 

The industrial action involves two warehouses, and of the 160 people employed in those, 65 are union members.

Workers first walked out for six days in December, before striking again from last Monday and holding a rally outside Barbour House.

Unite regional officer Fazia Hussain-Brown attended yesterday’s meeting, having called for staff not to be forced unfairly into working unsociable hours.

She said:

“We will hold a union meeting in the morning to discuss the company’s offer with members.

“Progress was made and this is positive, given that it was a difficult decision for our members to stand out in picket lines in the coldest temperatures of the winter.”

On Friday, local MPs Stephen Hepburn and Emma Lewell-Buck were invited to the Barbour headquarters to be briefed on the dispute and to help find a resolution.

Source –  Newcastle Evening Chronicle,  13 Jan 2015