Tagged: Tyne Dock

Bishop of Durham urges North East to give evidence on food banks

The Bishop of Durham has urged people in the North to provide evidence to a Parliamentary inquiry into food banks when it visits the region next month.

Members of the All Party Parliamentary Inquiry into Hunger and Food Poverty will visit South Shields on July 4 to gather evidence into the causes and extent of hunger in Britain and what can be done to alleviate it.

Bishop Paul Butler, who is a long-time supporter of food banks and has clashed with the Government over them, said: “The group is anxious to hear from those who find themselves in food poverty and also from groups and volunteers who are working to try and help through the provision of food assistance.

“This has become a major issue for society and I urge North East people to provide evidence to the inquiry. The group is keen to meet with those who have needed food assistance and those who provide this practical support.

“This is a chance for the North East to inform national decision-making on this crucial issue.”

On July 4, the group will visit the South Tyneside Churches Together Key Project at St Mary’s Centre, Tyne Dock, which provides assistance to young people and those under 25, and also the New Hope Food Bank in South Shields

Later in the afternoon there will be a chance people and groups involved in food banks to provide evidence to the group, which is being chaired by veteran MP Frank Field and the Bishop of Truro, the Right Revd Tim Thornton.

Source –  Newcastle Journal,  09 June 2014

South Tyneside – Food banks and advice services feel brunt of welfare reforms

Rising rent arrears, increased use of food banks and soaring demands for advice services are revealed in a shock new report focusing on the impact welfare reforms are having in South Tyneside.

 The Coalition Government’s welfare reform programme represents the biggest change to the welfare state since the Second World War with a raft of changes to benefits and tax credits to help cut spending and streamline services.

A new report by Helen Watson, South Tyneside Council’s corporate director for children, adults and families, outlines the human impact reforms are having in the borough.

It says that, within six months of the bedroom tax being introduced, rent arrears in the borough rose by 19 per cent – £81,000.

In total, South Tyneside Homes rent collection rates have fallen by 21 per cent over the last year, resulting in a loss of £331,000.

There has also been a 20 per cent increase in the demand for advice services since April last year.

Over the same period there has been a big rise in people using the borough’s three food banks, with a 50 per cent hike in referrals over the last 12 months.

There are 2,770 residents affected by the bedroom tax, with Tyne Dock, Victoria Road and Laygate, all South Shields, and The Lakes and Lukes Lane estates, in Hebburn, most affected.

Meanwhile, the number of out-of-work benefits being paid in the borough has been reduced in recent months, with a 22 per cent fall in claims for Jobseekers Allowance since April – 1,556 claimants.

The report makes grim reading for Coun Jim Foreman, the lead member for housing and transport at South Tyneside Council.

Coun Foreman believes the welfare reforms are having a “tsunami effect” and says the Government is “burying its head in the sand” by denying any direct connection between rising rent arrears and food bank usage and the welfare reforms.

He said: “The Government says there is no correlation between benefit cuts and the rise in food banks but they are just burying their heads in the sand.

“People don’t go to food banks out of choice. They go there because they are living in poverty. Having to use them is an attack on their pride and their resilience.”

Coun Foreman also expressed admiration for the “phenomenal work” being done by borough Citizens Advice Bureau staff and the South Tyneside Homes’ Welfare Reform team in a bid to minimise the impact of reforms.

He added: “It is not just a matter of the benefit cuts themselves but also the sanctions that are imposed if claimants turn up five minutes late for an appointment or don’t fill in a form or don’t make 15 applications for work in a week.

“All this is having a massive impact on the ability of people to provide for themselves and their families.”

Secretary of State for Work and Pensions Iain Duncan Smith, the driving force behind the welfare reforms, has claimed increased publicity over food banks was the reason for their rising popularity.

He said: “Food banks do a good service, but they have been much in the news. People know they are free. They know about them and they will ask social workers to refer them. It would be wrong to pretend that the mass of publicity has not also been a driver in their increased use.”

The welfare report is due to be presented to the council’s Riverside Community Area Forum at South Shields Town Hall at 6pm on Thursday.

Source – Shields Gazette  22 April 2014