Tagged: teenagers

Hundreds of North East homeless teenagers forced to fend for themselves, report shows

Hundreds of North East homeless teenagers are being left to fend for themselves, research shows.

A report, launched by The Children’s Society today, shows that across the region an estimated 300 teenagers aged 16 and 17 ask their local authority for emergency help with housing each year – but almost half are turned away and left to fend for themselves without even having their needs assessed.

The research based on Freedom of Information requests – sent to 353 local councils across England – also reveals that homeless 16-17-year-olds are rarely given the same support as children in care, such as access to an advocate or financial support.

Matthew Reed, chief executive of The Children’s Society, said:

“It is a disgrace that hundreds of vulnerable teenagers, who may have escaped physical or sexual abuse at home, have gone to their council to get help in finding a safe home, only to be turned away.

“These teenagers are being hung out to dry. Few have the money or resources to find new accommodation and their options are limited. At best they might rely on the goodwill of friends or family, at worst they may be forced to return to an unsafe home or to live on the streets. They are facing huge dangers from predators who seek to abuse or exploit them. Councils need to do much more to protect these vulnerable teenagers. Every teenager deserves a safe place to live.”

Research finds that homeless teenagers may be sent back to homes where there is violence or left rootless with no permanent home, facing threats of sexual abuse or being driven into crime.

Councils across England place hundreds of teenagers in Bed and Breakfasts (B&Bs) each year, going against government guidance which regards this type of accommodation as unsuitable.

It has been documented that B&Bs and hostels used to accommodate homeless people are targeted by sexual predators and drug dealers.

Even where teenagers are housed in supported accommodation, the reality is that it may not be suitable as it is not inspected and is unregulated.

The Children’s Society is calling for councils to join up their services and make sure that all teenagers who seek help for homelessness are assessed and given adequate support. They are also calling for B&B accommodation to be banned and hostels and supported accommodation to be regulated.

The charity is lobbying the government to make sure councils identify vulnerable 16 and 17-year-olds seeking help for homelessness, and provide them with flexible support and the same protection as care leavers.

Across England, an estimated 12,000 homeless 16 and 17-year-olds ask councils for help with housing each year – but more than 5,000 are turned away.

Source – Newcastle Evening Chronicle, 20 Mar 2015

Government ‘blunder’ risks thousands of teenagers losing the right to vote, MP warns

Thousands of the region’s teenagers risk losing their right to vote in the general election after a Government blunder, MPs are warning.

Local authorities are failing to register “attainers” – 17-year-olds who could be adults by May 7 – after errors in letters drafted by the Cabinet Office, they say

Now figures  reveal an extraordinary 80 per cent fall in attainers on the books of just one council, County Durham.

If the slump – of just over 3,000, in just one year – is replicated across the region, it would mean that close to 20,000 first-time voters could lost their vote.

The controversy was raised in a recent Commons debate by Kevan Jones, the North Durham MP, who described the situation as a “scandal”.

In North Durham constituency, there were 647 attainers on the register in February last year, but that number has plummeted to just 126 one year later – after the mistake.

The pattern is repeated in Bishop Auckland (a fall from 662 attainers to 118), Durham City (from 625 to 177), Easington (from 641 to 95),  North West Durham (from 689 to 156) and in Sedgefield (from 513 to 97).

Mr Jones said:

“We could put the fall down to a drop in the birth rate in 1997 – clearly there was a lack of passion in North Durham – but that is obviously not the case.

 The Labour MP urged ministers to provide funding to local councils and require them to use other data they hold on 17-year-olds to get them registered in time.

And he said:

“That must be done, otherwise many 17-year-olds who will turn 18 before May 7 will assume that they will get a vote, but will not get it.”

Under the old system, where the head of the household registered all voters, a section of the form asked for the names of any 17-year-olds to be added.

But the sentence is missing from letters sent out under the new system – of individual electoral registration (IER) – which is being introduced to combat fraud.

In reply, the deputy Commons leader Tom Brake, promised to write to Mr Jones, but stopped short of agreeing to instruct – and fund – town halls, to correct the problem.

 A spokesman for the Electoral Commission said it was “encouraging all local authorities” to write to every property in their area to tell 16 and 17-year-olds to go online to register.

Meanwhile, Bishop Auckland MP Helen Goodman criticised a separate barrier in the way of young people attempting to register – the requirement to provide a national insurance number.

She told ministers:

“A letter with a young person’s national insurance number arrives before they are 16 and we are suggesting that two years later teenagers will know where that letter is and have kept it in a safe place. I cannot think of anything more naïve.”

Source –  Northern Echo,  16 Feb 2015

Green Party candidate attacked while canvassing in Sunderland

A would-be councillor says he is too scared to leave the house after claiming a gang of youths stole his megaphone and attacked him while he was out campaigning.

 David Lawson is standing in Sunderland’s Hendon ward in tomorrow’s local elections for the Green Party.

The 50-year-old was canvassing in the area’s Gray Road on Monday evening when he said he was kicked and punched by three teenagers.

Unemployed Mr Lawson said: “I was out canvassing. I was on Gray Road, when someone asked me which party I was from.

“I said Green Party, then he told me to give him my megaphone.

“As I turned around, three other men came from nowhere, jumped on me and kicked me.

“They all attacked me, so I was knocking on doors asking for help, but no-one would help me.

“They said if they got the police, their windows would go through.”

He was eventually helped by a woman who was getting into her car in the road.

She used her mobile to call the police, who went to the street and spoke to the youths.

They made them give Mr Lawson his megaphone back, but didn’t make any arrests.

Mr Lawson, who has lived in Hendon all his life, considered pulling out of the elections, but has now changed his mind.

However, he has vowed it will be the last time he stands for election.

He added: “I’ve only been with the Green Party for a couple of months.

“I wanted to help the community.”

Mr Lawson praised the police for arriving quickly after his rescuer called 999.

He did not need any medical treatment, but added: “I’m too scared to leave the house on my own.”

A spokeswoman for Northumbria Police said no further action would be taken against those accused of upsetting Mr Lawton.

She said: “At 6.20pm on Monday night, police were informed that a group of youths had taken a megaphone from a man, while he was in Gray Road in Hendon.

“Officers attended and spoke to the man involved.”

Source – Sunderland Echo,  21 May 2014