Tagged: sanctioned claimants

Food bank study peer slammed for claiming ‘poor people don’t know how to cook’

A Conservative peer sparked anger yesterday when she suggested the poor were going hungry because they “don’t know how to cook”.

Baroness Jenkin of Kennington was forced to apologise for the comment, made at the launch of a landmark study into the explosion in food bank use.

The gaffe came as the Department for Work & Pensions (DWP) – criticised for benefit delays and harsh sanctions – appeared to snub the launch of the report, by the Archbishop of Canterbury.

And Work and Pensions Secretary Iain Duncan Smith came under fire for denying he had refused to meet the Trussell Trust, which runs most food banks, when it insisted he had.

At the Westminster event, Lady Jenkin, who served on the inquiry team, blamed hunger on, in part, a lack of knowledge about how to create cheap and nourishing meals.

She said:

“We have lost our cooking skills – poor people don’t know how to cook. I had a large bowl of porridge today, which cost 4p. A large bowl of sugary cereals will cost you 25p.”

Her comments immediately drew stinging criticism from across the region.

Councillor Peter Brookes, who helps run food banks in the Trimdon area of County Durham, said:

“It shows she hasn’t got a full understanding of the difficulties people who use food banks face. They don’t have the same choices as people like the Baroness to go out and buy fresh fruit and vegetables.”

Volunteers at the Hambleton Food Share initiative in Northallerton said hunger stemmed from sanctions on benefits, addictions, marriage breakdown and mental health issues – rather than a lack of cooking knowledge.

Scheme coordinator, Margaret Brice said many food bank users are unable to cook due to the issues they face, adding: “These are people in a crisis.”

A spokesman for the Middlesbrough Trussell Trust Foodbank said:

“When people do not have any money it does not matter if they have 25p or 4p. They have no money.

“People at the point of crisis are not there because they do not know how to cook. If you have not got anything in the cupboard you cannot cook it.”

 Bill Dixon, leader of Darlington Borough Council, said:
“People rely on food banks not because they do not have cooking skills, but because they do not have any money. It is not rocket science”

Later, Baroness Jenkin apologised, saying:

“I made a mistake. Obviously I was stupidly speaking unscripted.

“What I meant was, as a society, we have lost our ability to cook, or that no longer seems to be handed down in the way that it was in previously in previous generations.”

The row almost overshadowed a plea by Justin Welby, the Archbishop of Canterbury, for £100,000 of Government cash to kick-start a new organisation to eliminate hunger in the UK by 2020.

The DWP had been asked to attend and respond on the report’s recommendations, but – unlike the major supermarkets and utility regulators – failed to do so.

A junior minister from another department went instead, while No.10 ruled out changes to the sudden removal of benefits from “sanctioned” claimants – sending them to food banks, critics say.

In the Commons, Mr Duncan Smith said:

“I do take this report seriously. We have met the Trussell Trust—I have never refused to meet it.”

But Alison Inglis-Jones, a trustee of the Trussell Trust, said the organisation felt “vindicated”, adding: “Iain Duncan Smith has refused to talk to us for 18 months.

“We simply get irate letters back accusing us of scaremongering, saying this situation isn’t happening.”

Source –  Northern Echo,  08 Dec 2014

‘Benefit sanctions can lead to a spiral of decline and potentially destitution’, says Welfare Reform Committee

Benefit sanctions can lead to a spiral of decline and potentially destitution, often getting in the way of people getting back to work, according to the Scottish Parliament’s Welfare Reform Committee.

In its report Interim Report on the New Benefit Sanctions Regime: Tough Love or Tough Luck?, the committee refers to a climate of fear around jobcentres rather than one that encourages people to engage with them and find their way back to work.

Evidence presented showed that the loss of income that sanctions can lead to is now twice the maximum that can be imposed in fines by the courts.

The report identifies a number of weaknesses in the current system –

  • a consistent failure to notify people that they are being sanctioned and why;
  • a lack of flexibility and misapplication of sanctions reducing the likelihood of people finding work;
  • a failure to appreciate that many people on benefits do not have the necessary IT skills at day one to utilise the DWP’s Universal Jobmatch facility or other IT technology;
  • a failure to make those sanctioned aware of the availability of hardship payments;
  • the consistent triggering of a stop in housing benefit as a result of a sanction, which should not happen and can lead to significant debt being incurred even for a minor sanction;
  • the lack of a deadline for decision-making on DWP reconsiderations leading to delays in redressing wrong decisions; and
  • the shunting of the costs of dealing with sanctioned claimants onto other agencies: local authorities, health board, third sector agencies etc.

Noting that four in ten decisions to apply a sanction are overturned, the report calls for a review of the current regime and makes several recommendations for change.

Commenting on the report, Committee Convener Michael McMahon said:

“The system is so broken that many people do not know why they have been sanctioned, which totally undermines the DWP assertion that sanctions ‘teach’ people a lesson.

“How many of us could manage if we did not get paid one week, without any notice or often explanation?

“This demonstrates once again the enormous gulf between reality and DWP thinking.

Interim Report on the New Benefit Sanctions Regime: Tough Love or Tough Luck? is available from scottish.parliament.uk

Source –  Benefits & Work,  12 June 2014

http://www.benefitsandwork.co.uk/news/2800-benefit-sanctions-can-lead-to-a-spiral-of-decline-and-potentially-destitution-says-welfare-reform-committee

Welfare Reform Impacting On Mental Health, Say SNP

Scottish National Party (SNP)  Press Release:

The Scottish National Party has criticised the UK government for failing benefits claimants with mental health problems.

Speaking in a Westminster Hall debate today [7 May 2014] on Improving the Employment and Support Allowance application process for people with mental health problems, SNP Work and Pensions spokesperson Dr Eilidh Whiteford MP will condemn the UK government’s Work Capability Assessment (WCA) for its shortcomings with regard to people with mental health conditions.

 Concerns have been raised by mental healthcare professionals and representative organisations that WCA doesn’t capture the impact of more serious mental illnesses on a person’s capacity to function in a working environment, and leads to poor decision making.

According to a Freedom of Information request, in 2013, 58% (6 out of 10) ESA claimants hit by sanctions were vulnerable people with a mental health condition or learning difficulty – an increase from 35% of sanctioned claimants in 2009 – indicating that people with mental health problems are being inappropriately sanctioned.

Commenting, Dr Whiteford said:

“The UK government must do more to help some of society’s most vulnerable people.

“I have seen an increasing stream of people with quite serious mental illnesses over the last couple of years who are falling through our now very frayed social safety net because of Welfare Reforms. I’m sure it goes without saying that many people with a mental illness won’t ever need to depend on the benefits system. But some of those with more severe mental illnesses do require support, and some of them are extremely vulnerable.

“A key problem is that too often assessors and decision makers have little or no relevant background information about claimants’ complex medical histories, and too rarely seek input or opinions from claimants’ clinicians.

“A report recently published by the Scottish Association for Mental Health, SAMH, details findings on how the experiences of living in poverty affect peoples’ mental health, and how SAMH service users with mental health problems have been affected by UK government welfare reforms. A truly shocking finding was that 98% of respondents said that welfare reforms were impacting on their mental health, including increased stress and anxiety, while 79% were facing financial impacts such as reduced income.

“In six cases reported to the 2013 survey, SAMH staff had to carry out suicide interventions directly related to the welfare reforms.

“The information is there in black and white, and the UK government cannot continue to ignore it.”

> I’ll bet you anything that they can…

Source – Welfare News Service  08 May 2014

http://welfarenewsservice.com/welfare-reform-impacting-mental-health-say-snp/