Tagged: Right Reverend Paul Butler

Bishop saddened at low aspirations of North-East’s young people

The North-East’s most senior churchman says he is disturbed at the decline in young people’s hopes and aspirations as they move to secondary school.

The Right Reverend Paul Butler, the Bishop of Durham, said children in the North-East had lower aspirations than anywhere else in the country and hopes and aspirations “decline greatly” with the move from primary to secondary education.

The Bishop used his Easter message to demand more be done to help North-East children achieve their dreams.

“Unfortunately, as some children get older, their hopes and aspirations tend to reduce,” he said.

“The difficult truth is that the North-East of England has the lowest levels of aspirations among young people in the whole country, which is a sad statistic and one that should be hard to accept for all of us.

“Disturbingly hopes and aspirations decline greatly with the move from primary to secondary education.

“This is something we need to change. We all need to give our children and young people a sense of hope that their aspirations can be met rather than a sense that they will fail to achieve their dreams.

 “We need also to help them have sensible hopes; not everyone can become a famous celebrity. Good hopes and aspirations are about being people who help others and contribute well to our whole society.”

Bishop Butler is the Church of England’s lead bishop for children and young people and made youngsters one of his top three priorities upon getting the job last year.

He has regularly spoken out on issues affecting children, including raising concerns over calls to teach sex education in primary schools.

His Easter message was prompted by a visit to Evenwood CofE Primary School, in Teesdale, where he said children did a brilliant job of retelling the Easter story using drama, song and video and it was a huge delight to be alongside the terrific staff and many proud parents, grandparents and carers.

He said urged Christians to encourage young people and show them Easter, when Christians celebrate the resurrection of Jesus from the dead, can be a time for hope.

Source – Durham Times,  02 Apr 2015

Bishop of Durham ‘surprised’ by North-East poverty

The North-East’s top churchman says he has been surprised at the depths of poverty within some areas of his new patch.

Speaking ahead of the first anniversary of his enthronement as Bishop of Durham this weekend , the Right Reverend Paul Butler said he had been aware there were “serious levels” of poverty in the region but he had been surprised by its “depths”.

Having spent much of his first year in the job touring the area and meeting its people, Bishop Butler said the economic recovery was beginning to reach the North-East but only slowly and there were still a “disturbing” number of people out of work.

He said some communities had still not fully recovered from the demise of coal mining, a discovery which had surprised and saddened him.

> Which suggests it’ll be another 30 years before they catch up following the current situation !

However, he praised churches, councils and businesses working to combat the problems.

Whilst I knew there were serious levels of poverty, I’ve been surprised by the depths of it and the slowness with which the economic recovery is impacting our area,” he said.

“I’m glad to see it is beginning to. We now have more people employed in the North-East than ever in history, but we still have a disturbing number of people out of work.

> More people employed than ever before ?  I find that hard to believe.

“There are some communities that have never fully recovered from the closure of the mines. There’s been lots of inward investment but there are communities still to find their purpose. I’ve been surprised by that.

“I’ve been saddened by it, but impressed by the way churches are seeking to engage with their local communities in helping individuals and communities find that purpose and reason for being.”

The Bishop was speaking as Labour and the Conservatives announced plans to tackle youth unemployment; Labour pledging a compulsory jobs guarantee for the young unemployed
> workfare…
and David Cameron saying the long-term young unemployed should have to do unpaid work to access benefits.
> or workfare. Its always nice to have a choice.

The patron of the Darlington Foundation for Jobs, Bishop Butler said youth unemployment was a “particular concern” and not enough businesses were creating apprenticeships to address it.

Source – Durham Times, 18 Feb 2015

Bishop of Durham backs calls for nursery staff to report potentially radicalised families

> So  bad news for church sunday schools, C. of E. schools and other Christian organizations who push religious dogma at kids ?  Probably not…

The Bishop of Durham has backed plans to ask nursery staff to look out for radicalised families in the wake of the Paris terror attacks.

Speaking in a House of Lords debate on the Counter-Terrorism and Security Bill, the Right Reverend Paul Butler also welcomed moves to intervene more in the lives of people at risk of being drawn in by extremism.

But he warned more needs to be done at a “grassroots” level to tackle the issue long term, and that breaking up families could help create future terrorists.

“I share with every other reasonable person a horror of the evil actions and effects of terrorism, grief for the suffering caused by terrorist acts and a heartfelt concern for those whose lives are lost or wounded through it.

“Events in Paris last week clearly illustrated this to us all. However, those events also highlight the need to ensure that we keep a global awareness and perspective, as the fresh Boko Haram attacks in Baga and its surrounding villages last Friday show us. Around 2,000 were killed.

“As we consider the latest set of government moves to strengthen the laws which guard our people against terrorist acts, we have to hold our nerve in our convictions about liberty, equality and fraternity, and look steadily at the changes being proposed,” he added.

“These matters are too serious for us to polarise or politicise issues beyond what is justified in legitimate debate.”

Praising the work done by the faith groups in Sunderland, Gateshead, and South Shields, to build strong community relationships – “the most powerful force against radicalisation, especially among young people” – the bishop said however that there is a fine line to be trodden between ensuring security and encouraging community cohesion.

Some have mocked the idea of nursery staff being obliged to report any signs of extremism in a family,” he said. “I do not share the mockery, as terrorist behaviour is abusive behaviour.

“Nevertheless, the placing of such an obligation adds to the risks of creating a culture of suspicion and the sense that every citizen is expected to be on the look-out to report on their neighbour rather than build good relationships with them.

“Great care needs to be taken not to overburden schools or erode their capacity to build diversity and trust among pupils, staff and parents.

“Breaking up a family, as could occur, could also create longer-term harm even, at one extreme, sowing the seeds of the next generation of terrorists in young children.”

The bishop said that continuing community work would be “fundamental to long-term prevention” as it “does not carry the risks of fuelling narratives of persecution and heroic resistance.”

Countering radical terrorism is a long-term grass-roots matter. Long-term support for good community development will reap the best long-term rewards.

“This is not so much a matter of draining the swamp by immediate legislation as tilling the ground.”

The debate heard from the former head of MI5, Lord Evans of Weardale, that the threat of terrorism in the UK is rising at the same time as the ability of the security services to combat it has decreased.

In his maiden speech in the upper house, Lord Evans, who retired as director general of the agency in 2013, said that the Edward Snowden leaks had made it harder to tackle the terrorist threat.

And he said the Government needed to tackle the “unfinished business” of giving the security services greater powers to access communications data.

> Powers that they will, naturally, voluntarily relinquish once the danger has passed…

Lord Evans told peers:

“When I left MI5 in 2013, I felt cautiously optimistic that we were over the worst as far as Al Qaeda and Islamist terrorist attacks were concerned in this country.

“It seemed to me that we were making significant progress. Regrettably, subsequent events have proved that judgment to be wrong.

“The atrocious killing of Fusilier Rigby in May 2013 demonstrated the reality of the threat we face in this country and the brutal murders in Paris last week demonstrate that this is a European and international problem, not one we face alone.”

> One man got killed in the street by two other men. This happens all the time, all over the country. You’ve got a far higher chance of getting done in by a couple of indigenous thugs than you have by an Islamic terrorist.

All the Islamic terror attacks in Britain – as 9/11 in the USA – appear to be isolated one-off events, and although they may spark copycat attacks I don’t really believe that there is a highly organized terror organization.  But the government cynically encourages belief in one  in order to erode our rights.

In any case, who are the real terrorists ? More people have died in Britain as a result of current government welfare policies than at the hands of terrorists.

Anyone who has had to deal with the Jobcentre and other agencies might consider that governmnent/terrorism are merely two sides of the same coin.

Lord Evans, who sits as an independent crossbench peer, said events in Syria and Iraq had given extremist networks in the UK a “jolt of energy”.

> Not half as much a one as our continued poking our armed forces into other countries business (the ones with oil, at least…)

He said at least 600 people had gone as would-be jihadists to fight in Syria and Iraq, and he had no doubt that number would increase “significantly” in coming months.

And he warned the situation put him in mind of the Al Qaeda training camps in Afghanistan before 9/11 which “drew would-be jihadists from across the globe”.

On their return, many of them were even more radical than they had been when they departed,” he said.

They had experience of combat and had been trained in violence and they had an international network of support on which they could draw.

“Those circumstances led to a series of attacks internationally and over a long period, and I fear we may be facing the same situation as we go forward from today and we are starting to see that.

“At the same time, the revelations made by Edward Snowden, whatever you think of what he did, have clearly led a reduction in the ability of the security agencies both here and overseas to access and read the communications of terrorists internationally with the result that as the threat from terrorism has gone up in the last two years, the ability of the security agencies to counter those threats has gone down.

“The result of this can only be that the overall risk of a successful terrorist attack in this country has risen.”

Source –  Newcastle Evening Chronicle, 14 Jan 2015

Parishioners begging vicars for food – Bishop of Durham

Church vicars are increasingly being asked for help by hungry parishioners, the Bishop of Durham has claimed.

The Right Reverend Paul Butler spoke out as ministers sought to brush off new figures revealing more than 900,000 people turned to foodbanks for emergency relief in the past 12 months – a near three-fold increase on the previous year.

Bishop Butler, a former social worker, said: “Clergy have told me of increased requests directly from parishioners struggling to make ends meet.”

And, having joined dozens of bishops and hundreds of faith leaders in signing an open letter demanding the Government take urgent action, he urged: “This is a reality and not a problem that will easily be solved – but solve it, we must.”

The Trussell Trust, which runs 400 foodbanks nationwide, reported a 463 per cent year-on-year rise in demand across the North-East.

Bishop Butler said that many families were facing the “terrible reality” of empty cupboards was deeply challenging and raised acute moral, social and political questions.

Speaking of a recent visit to a Hartlepool foodbank, he said the number of children in need was shocking.

One foodbank user from Brandon said she had asked for help having been forced to leave a stable life and move to care for her father and his partner.

“We have now been housed by Durham County Council, found help and guidance through places like foodbank. Without this help until benefits are resolved and wages for new jobs are paid, we would not be able to survive,” she added.

The faith leaders’ letter, published today, calls food poverty a “national crisis” and comes just two months after 27 bishops said Prime Minister David Cameron had a moral duty to act on the growing number going hungry.

 The Department for Works and Pensions has tried to dismiss the foodbank figures as unclear and misleading, but Maria Eagle, the shadow environment secretary, said they told the “shocking truth” of Britain’s cost-of-living crisis and said ministers needed to get a grip.

Source – Northern Echo  18 April 2014