Tagged: Redcar and Cleveland Borough Council

Ed Miliband picketed at campaign rally by former leading members of his own party

Labour leader Ed Miliband denied accusations he supported “bullies” or was a “coward” after an attack by disgruntled party members on a visit to the North-East.

Mr Miliband gave a speech and took questions from the public on a visit to Redcar, a town which the party hopes to take from the Liberal Democrats in May’s General Election.

He offered a vision of better jobs, fairer employment rights and more power and money for the region – but the event was overshadowed by a protest from former party loyalists.

The demonstration outside Redcar and Cleveland College, where the Labour leader was speaking, was led by former long-standing Labour leader of Redcar and Cleveland Borough Council, George Dunning, who brandished a banner saying ‘Does Miliband Support Bullies?’.

Cllr Dunning, a trade-unionist and former steelworker, and ten other councillors were deselected by the party earlier this year.

The councillors went on to resign from the Labour Party saying they had been “bullied.”

Cllr Dunning’s former deputy leader, Sheelagh Clarke, went further,  branding Mr Miliband “a coward.”

She said:

“He called Cameron a coward because the Prime Minister won’t take part in the TV debates. But he can’t find a quick minute to talk to eight, nine or ten of us ordinary people. How can he be leader of our country if he can’t talk to a few ordinary people? It is cowardly.”

 In an interview with The Northern Echo, Mr Miliband dismissed the protest, saying: “I understand why people are upset, but our focus has to be on the public.”

Mr Miliband said he was offering “a big plan” for the region which included increasing the minimum wage, more apprenticeships for youngsters, an end to ‘zero hours’ contracts and more high quality jobs. A key area where the economy could be boosted and high paid jobs created was green energy, he said, which with some Government investment and encouragement could be a major asset to the North-East.

Earlier, Mr Miliband welcomed the improved employment figures, with 45,000 new jobs created in the region since Labour lost power in 2010, but said many were “low paid, insecure and not good enough.”

 The Labour leader also confirmed a Labour Government would guarantee free TV licences, bus passes and the value of the state pension for old age pensioners

But in much of his question and answer session with about 200 members of the public he focused on what he would do for young people, including guaranteeing apprenticeships for 18-year-olds and lowering university tuition fees.

Asked about the decline in Durham Tees Valley Airport he promised a future Labour Government would “look at the whole issue of regional airports.”

One Teesside woman spoke movingly of having to leave work for eight months to look after her severely ill, 11-year-old daughter with various authorities declining to offer support, while another talked of having to look after four grandchildren and having to give up her home.

Mr Miliband received his biggest round of applause after publicly thanking the women for their “incredibly important work” and said it was an issue the party was already looking at.

Source – Northern Echo, 07 Mar 2015

Redcar council leader says ‘real’ working-class MPs are being squeezed out of Parliament

Poloticians with “plumby” accents are squeezing out working class MPs from Parliament, a leading North councillor has warned.

George Dunning, leader of Redcar and Cleveland Borough Council, said “career politicians” with “silver tongues” are being parachuted in ahead of real people in the corridors of power.

Coun Dunning, who worked in the Teesside steel industry for more than 30 years, said he was recently interviewed by a Labour panel of councillors who struggled to understand what he was saying.

I don’t talk with plumbs in my mouth because I was born and raised as part of a working-class Teesside family,” he said.

The Labour panel said I tended to raise my voice during debate and this made me difficult to understand.

“Obviously these people didn’t know I spent 30 years or more working in steel and 10 of those with no hearing protection.

“What annoys a lot of us, is, although we are a diminishing breed in steel, chemical and manufacturing, we are still around and we should have adequate representation in Parliament.

“I think it’s a kick in the teeth when members of your own political party struggle to understand why you talk the way you do.

“We’re working people with working-class backgrounds.

“Let’s see more real people in Parliament and not just the increasing breed of career politicians.”

The Teesside council leader is not alone in raising the issue of accent.

Wansbeck MP Ian Lavery, who was born and raised in  Ashington, accused Parliament of being hostile to working-class northerners.

He said: “We’ve got an elite in Westminster which, quite frankly, frightens me.

“They haven’t been anywhere or done anything, and when you’ve got an accent like mine, they think ‘Well, that man doesn’t know too much.”

> Mind you, you know what they say about the Ashington accent…

A woman goes into a hairdressers in Ashington and says “give me a perm.”

“Ok“, replies the hairdresser, “I wandered lonely as a cloud…”

His Labour colleague, Pat Glass, who represents North West Durham, last year gave her take on the culture within Westminster.

If they spot a northern accent they start shouting about it to put you off,” she said.

Coun Dunning backed Mr Lavery’s words and credited the Northumberland MP as one of the few “real” working-class politicians in the Houses of Parliament.

“Ian Lavery’s comments hit where it hurts,” said Coun Dunning. “That being the elite class of MPs at Westminster feeling Ian’s blunt words. Then the truth always does, especially when stressing the lack of real people in Parliament.”

Source –  Sunday Sun, 11 Jan 2015

North East police and councils tapping into phone calls and emails

The region’s police forces are snooping on phone calls and emails 53 times every day, it has been revealed – triggering an investigation.

The surveillance watchdog has raised the alarm over forces using powers to tap into communications data far too often, warning privacy may be at risk.

And it announced an inquiry into whether there should be stricter curbs on the police and other law enforcement bodies – to ensure snooping is not an “automatic resort“.

A report to Parliament revealed that forces in the North-East and North Yorkshire tapped into communications data a staggering 19,444 times in 2013.

The highest total was recorded by Durham police (6,218), followed by Northumbria (6,211), North Yorkshire (4,058) and then Cleveland (2,957).

Authorisation is granted to uncover the “who, when and where” of a communication, such as who owns the phone, or email address, or computer IP address.

The police also learn who that person was in contact with electronically – but not what was said in that communication.

The powers are granted under the controversial Regulation of Investigatory Powers Act (Ripa), which the Coalition altered after protests, to curb excessive spying.

 Sir Anthony May, the Interception of Communications Commissioner, said public bodies had secured a total of 514,608 requests for communications data nationwide, last year.

His report concluded: “It seems to me to be a very large number. It has the feel of being too many.

“I have accordingly asked our inspectors to take a critical look at the constituents of this bulk to see if there might be a significant institutional overuse.

“This may apply in particular to police forces and law enforcement agencies who between them account for approaching 90 per cent of the bulk.”

Nationwide, most communications were tapped into to “prevent or detect crime, or prevent disorder“, followed by “emergency, to prevent death or injury“.

Durham Police mounted a strong defence of its use of covert tactics, arguing almost everybody now used a mobile phone and the internet.

The force insisted it “takes the privacy of individuals seriously” and that every application under Ripa is considered by a senior person independent of the investigation.

Detective Superintendent Lee Johnson said: “Some individuals in society have no consideration of the rights of others and commit crime and make use of phones to enable the commission of the crime.

“When identifying the location of a missing person, a wanted person, or how a phone has been used in the commission of a crime, it is now an important investigative tool to make use of call data in locating someone, or proving their criminality.

“The public expect the police service to make effective use of tools available to them to protect vulnerable individuals in society, or identify offenders and bring them to justice.”

And Home Secretary Theresa May backed forces, saying: “Communications data is vital in helping to keep the public safe: it is used to investigate crimes, bring offenders to justice and to save lives.”

The annual report also listed many local authorities which snooped on phone calls and emails last year, including York (80 times) and Redcar and Cleveland (69).

However, a spokesman for Redcar and Cleveland Borough Council said its high figure was explained by its regional role coordinating ‘Scambusters‘ trading standards crackdowns.

In fact, only one of the 69 authorisations listed in the watchdog’s report was actually carried out by Redcar and Cleveland, he added.

Similarly, a spokesman for York City Council said its high figure was the result of its similar regional role in tackling ‘e-crime‘.

It said it applied through the National Anti-Fraud Network to identify those behind the telephone numbers they were investigating, but not the content of the messages.

Colin Rumford, City of York Council’s Head of Regional Investigations, said: “We make applications through the National Anti-Fraud Network to identify the people and organisations behind telephone numbers that we’re investigating as part of our sizeable remit to work for the national trading standards e-crime team, the regional trading standards Scambuster team and local consumer fraud.

“None of the applications relate in any way to the interception of messages between individuals.”

All fire authorities and ambulance services in the region reported that they did not use the powers.

Source – Northern Echo  10 April 2014