Tagged: police officers

Cleveland Police leave sorry note after raiding wrong Edinburgh flat

Police have been left red-faced after breaking down the door of the wrong home during an early-morning raid – leaving a handwritten note to apologise.

The botched operation, which took place at 7.30am on Wednesday, saw eight officers from the North East of England and Edinburgh storm a flat in Pennywell Road, in the Scottish capital, after the family there left for work.

But after drilling a hole in the front door to remove the lock and force entry into the home, it quickly became apparent that they had mixed up names and targeted the wrong person.

Incredibly, it is the second time confused officers have wrongly linked the family to a serious assault in the North East of England.

 Father-of-two Alistair McPhail said his son had been questioned by Police Scotland back in August in relation to the offence, but had been cleared after only 25 minutes when officers became convinced the 21-year-old insurance worker was innocent.

Mr McPhail, 52, said:

“It’s like the Keystone Cops. They were apparently there for four hours trying to gain entry.

“It’s ridiculous that they have time to do this. I told them, ‘Next time you fancy a jolly in Edinburgh go and see the Castle and leave my flat alone’.

“Is this how they do policing now?

“I’m not going to let this lie. I’m going to have to make a complaint. My son is going to have to because he has his career to worry about.

“I’m really sorry for the person who was assaulted, but that doesn’t justify them coming up and doing this.

“All I want is my door back to how it was – it’s all scratched and battered.

“I just want people to realise that you can be completely law abiding and go about your life, but there’s nothing to stop the police coming in your house anyway.”

After the unsuccessful operation, embarrassed officers left a handwritten note in the McPhails’ living room asking them to “please accept our sincere apologies for this inconvenience”.

The letter also listed 
telephone numbers to contact if the family wished to make a claim for the damage inflicted on their door.

A spokeswoman for Cleveland Police said:

“The officers acted upon the information that was available to them at the time. It wasn’t made apparent until today that the person at the address was unconnected to the investigation.

“Police officers from the Edinburgh area attended the address to support Cleveland officers who were carrying out the warrant.”

Source –  Hartlepool Mail, 04 Apr 2015

Police forces in North East lose staff for fifth consecutive year

The North East has more than 1,000 fewer police officers than it did five years ago after five consecutive year of job losses.

New figures show that Northumbria, Cleveland and Durham police forces all lost officers last year, and though there were small rises in the force numbers for Cumbria and North Yorkshire, the total number of officers in the region fell below 9,000 for the first time since records began in 2003.

By contrast, there were 10,142 policemen and women in the North in 2010 when the coalition Government came to power.

Among biggest losers in numbers this year was Cleveland Police, which contracted by 5.6% this year, one of the biggest reductions in the country and far more than the 1.3% reduction nationally. 81 officers left the force in the past year – more than three a fortnight.

Northumbria, the region’s largest force, lost 104 officers in the year, a 2.8% drop, while Durham lost 74 officers. Its 5.4% reduction was also one of the biggest in the country.

Police Federation general secretary Andy Fittes said: “The latest police workforce national statistics for England and Wales show that numbers of police workers are now at a 12-year low.

“Cuts to policing have put a strain on all aspects of the service and while officers have been doing an incredible job to bridge the gaps, cracks are beginning to show and they are telling us they are feeling the pressure.

“The nature of offending is starting to change but we have seen many of our specialist teams and units, who work to address these changes, cut or under threat.

“While officers throughout the country continue to work incredibly hard on a daily basis keeping society safe, it would be wrong to assume these cuts aren’t starting to have a noticeable effect.”

Nationally, nine of the 43 police forces in England and Wales increased their numbers between 2013 and 2014. Cumbria added 29 new members of staff while North Yorkshire added 38. The biggest increase was to the British Transport Police, which got 260 new members of staff.

Nobody was available at the local forces for comment.

Source –  Sunday Sun, 20 July 2014

Police warning ahead of EDL march in Middlesbrough

Protesters have been warned anti-social or criminal behaviour at marches planned this weekend will be dealt with by police.

Almost 350 EDL supporters have said they will march through the streets of Middlesbrough on Saturday afternoon with more considering it.

There have been concerns they may try to march through some of the town’s ethnic minority areas, finishing at the war memorial on Linthorpe Road.

Counter demonstrations are also being planned by groups opposed to the EDL.

Now Cleveland Police has said while groups have the right to stage a peaceful protest, action would be taken if necessary.

A spokesman said officers had been working to ensure the event passed peacefully.

He urged marchers: “Please enjoy a peaceful event, respect the town and respect those who are going about their daily business.”

Marchers were warned banners, flags and placards that might incite disorder would be banned along with anything that could be used to cause injury or damage.

Face coverings, masks and scarves if used to conceal someone’s identity are also banned and the distribution of leaflets in Middlesbrough town centre is prohibited.

The last demonstration by the EDL  which went through Middlesbrough town centre in 2011 passed off peacefully despite it being on the same day as a United Against Fascism march.

The police spokesman added: “We aim to use a proportionate number of police officers to ensure your protest remains peaceful and safe. We will however respond to any outbreaks of disorder.

“Middlesbrough is a town of peace – with your help and co-operation we can keep it that way.”

Source –  Middlesbrough Evening Gazette,  26 June 2014

Middlesbrough Council meeting stopped after members of the public refuse to stop filming

A council meeting descended into chaos last night when two members of the public began filming inside Middlesbrough Town Hall.

The meeting was halted just minutes after the new chairman was agreed as Cllr Bob Kerr.

Made aware of the filming taking place, he asked the men to cease filming.

When the men refused to put down the cameras and stop filming, two police officers entered the council chamber to speak to the men.

 The chairman then suspended the meeting and left the chamber.

After several minutes he returned to ask everyone to evacuate the building and congregate in the quadrangle outside.

After a 30 minute delay, councillors, the media and members of the public – except the men with cameras who were prevented from re-entering the building by the police – returned and the meeting resumed.

Beechwood ward Cllr Joan McTigue said: “It is a public meeting and councillors themselves tweet away to people outside – what is being said and by whom etc. Therefore I see no problem with it being filmed and put into the public domain.”

Last June Local Government Secretary Eric Pickles published a guide which states councils should allow the public to film, blog and tweet council meetings.

But the chairman said: “According to 25.2 of the Constitution no photography or filming can take place. The chair has the authority according to the Constitution of asking and if necessary forcing anyone doing so to leave.”

When the meeting resumed, North Ormesby and Brambles Farm ward councillor Len Junier proposed an amendment regarding allowances that every councillor in the authority should take a 5% cut for the next two years.

Mayor Ray Mallon accused him of speaking to the press saying it was “narrow-minded”.

He said: “If I had my way I would give them a bit of a pay rise. A 5% cut would be minimal, it would not be a pin prick in relation to the savings.”

The majority voted against the amendment.

Middlesbrough Conservative leader Chris Hobson submitted a proposal to alter the new senior management structure which she said would save the local authority £363,000. Mr Mallon said he would meet with her to discuss it further. Six voted for it, 34 against.

Source – Middlesbrough Evening Gazette,  15 May 2014

Northumbria Police announce huge job losses due to funding cuts

A huge restructure of Northumbria Police will see more than 400 jobs go and police stations closed as part of ongoing measures to save a total of £104m in response to “relentless” Government funding cuts.

The force will lose 230 members of staff – some by voluntary or compulsory redundancy – and reduce its number of senior officers by 200, through ‘natural turnover’.

They will also close “expensive” police stations, and reduce the number of area commands from six to three.

The restructure plans were announced last night as it was revealed that Northumbria Police has to save an additional £46m by March 2017, having already delivered £58m of savings since the start of the Government’s Comprehensive Spending Review in 2010.

Police and Crime Commissioner, Vera Baird, branded the cuts “unfair” but promised to protect frontline services working in neighbourhoods throughout the region.

> What does that mean ? We still wont see the coppers we already never see, unless speeding past in a car ?

She said: “The Government cuts are relentless and unfair. They impact far more heavily on our police service than on many others. The Chief Constable and I are very committed to maintaining the number of police officers and staff working in our neighbourhoods.

“To achieve this we need to do things differently, use technology more effectively and work from different buildings that are cheaper to run.”

The proposals, which the force stress are in the early stages, will see some “outdated” police stations closed and Neighbourhood Policing Teams relocated to bases within the communities they serve in shared accommodation facilities such as leisure centres.

> A plastic plod in the front of a supermarket, strictly 9-5, and able only to refer you to the police’s website, no doubt

However, a spokeswoman for Northumbria said that no police buildings will close until suitable new locations have been found.

Mrs Baird added: “We will relocate Neighbourhood Policing Teams to bases in the local community, usually shared with other services. We are currently doing this in North Tyneside where we are proposing to have police in the White Swan Centre at Killingworth following public consultation, rather than in an outdated, expensive-to-maintain police station in Forest Hall.

“We are keen to make further savings by relocating other neighbourhood policing teams into the communities that they serve, as this is what local policing is all about. However, we guarantee no police services will be relocated until we have found accessible bases within the community for neighbourhood teams to work from and they are working well.

“I am conscious that local people are feeling the effects of the economic downturn very acutely in our region. We have managed to protect frontline numbers and deliver the savings needed without the public having to pay more.”

> You’d never guess she used to be an MP, would you ?

Another change in the way Northumbria Police operate will be the down-sizing of the current six area commands – Newcastle, Gateshead, North Tyneside, South Tyneside, Northumberland and Sunderland – to three.

These will cover existing local authority areas coming under North, Central and South. North will cover North Tyneside and Northumberland, Central will serve Newcastle and Gateshead and South will cover Sunderland and South Tyneside.

> With the possible closure of Sunderland’s city centre Gilbridge police station being mooted  – to go with the probable closure of the city centre fire station. How long before someone decides the city doesn’t really need a hospital either ?

The force has said it has made every effort to safeguard the services the public say they value most, which is visible policing in their communities.

> Invisible policing, more like ! Otherwise only seen when there’s a football match on.

The proposed changes, which won’t see any increase in council tax, will not reduce the service to the public nor impact on the force’s ability to reduce crime and disorder, according to Northumbria Police.

> Truth is,  the region is never going to be a potential Tory electoral gain (Hexham aside), so why should  anyone in government really care what happens here ? 

On the other hand, it’s safe Labour seats, so they don’t appear to feel the need to stand up for us either – they take it for granted that they’ll get voted back whatever happens.

Talk about being between a rock and a hard place !

Perhaps, should Scotland go independant, they might consider extending the border down to the Tees…

Source – Newcastle Journal, Sunderland Echo, 09 Jan 2014