Tagged: Peter Jackson

Blyth MP says North East has ‘unfair deal’ after missing out on emergency social care funding

A North East MP has accused Government ministers of ignoring the region’s “first class” healthcare when dishing out emergency cash awards.

This week, Westminster approved a £25m injection into social care for older people in areas where hospitals are facing the biggest problems over delayed patient discharges.

But of the 65 local authorities in England to receive the money, which must be spent by the end of March to ease pressure on wards by moving patients into care in the community, none are in the North East.

Ronnie Campbell, Labour member for Blyth Valley, claims the funding is “almost all southern based where local authorities haven’t been on the receiving end of same level of ConDem cuts as Northern authorities” which have still managed to provide “a first class service”.

And he accused the Government of bailing out councils who are failing to organise their discharges from hospitals properly, while not rewarding Northumberland, North and South Tyneside, Sunderland, Durham and Newcastle councils who are facing up to the challenges.

He explained:

“I’m very worried that local authorities like Northumberland are having their budgets hacked to bits and yet they’re coping with the transfer from NHS care to local authority care.

“They’re under enormous pressure to deliver other services to the general public yet Eric Pickles and Jeremy Hunt are rewarding councils which happen to have marginal constituencies in them. 

“This doesn’t seem to be the ‘fair deal for Northumberland’ local Tories are trumpeting – in fact, this ranks up there with the 20% cut to transport funding and £3m further cuts to the council budget as an example of how the ConDems are targeting the North for purely party political reasons.”

The Department of Health emergency fund was authorised by a special ministerial committee, which has met weekly to help the NHS cope with winter pressures.

According to NHS England, one in five hospital beds was occupied over the Christmas period by someone ready for discharge but unable to move on because of blockages in the system. About a third of these blockages were attributed to lack of social care services.

The average cash boost for each of the 65 councils is £380,000, with money to be spent on extra support for people in their homes and short-term places in residential homes.

Responding to Mr Campbell, Coun Peter Jackson, Tory leader on Northumberland County Council, said:

“The truth is that this Government has fully protected NHS funding from day one.

“Rather than acknowledge this or the indication that our local health care services are performing much better than others across the country, Labour are once again resorting to scaremongering tactics and displaying financial illiteracy.

“Mr Campbell appears to be deliberately misleading the public by confusing local government and health care funding.”

Meanwhile, a spokesman for the Department of Health added:

“We planned for winter earlier than ever this year. We constantly review what additional measures we can take to ease the pressure on services.

“In preparation for the Better Care Fund, the NHS and local authorities are already preparing joint plans to work together better, keep people well and avoid hospital admissions. This money helps speed up that work for this winter.”

Source –  Newcastle Evening Chronicle, 23 Jan 2015

Protest fails to restore free transport for Northumberland students

Placard waving parents have failed in their bid to persuade Northumberland County Council to scrap free transport for youngsters over 16.

They were out in force at the extraordinary meeting of Northumberland County Council on Friday, but the Labour group defeated the bid for a rethink by 34 votes to 30.

Leader of Northumberland Conservatives, Coun Peter Jackson, said: “Having forced Labour to hold a council meeting it is disappointing that there was no mood from them for any form of compromise.”

He said it was from the comments from the worried parents and their children attending the meeting that transport arrangements for the new term starting in September were in a state of chaos.

He also said it was regrettable the minority Labour group had won the support of independent councillors to push through the proposal.

Labour leader of the council Coun. Grant Davey said: “We’ve listened carefully to what the public have had to say, not just today but throughout the consultation period, but the bottom line is we have to balance our budget.”

Source – Hexham Courant,  16 July 2014

Meeting called to debate Northumberland ‘teenage transport tax’

With pressure mounting to reverse a decision to axe free transport for students, Northumberland County Council has agreed to hold an extraordinary meeting in Morpeth next week.

 Angry parents and opponents of the Labour administration at county hall have been urging the county council to reverse its decision to reintroduce transport charges for students over the age of 16.

They say it discriminates against parents in the north and rural parts of the county and that the consultation was inadequate.

They have also been highly critical of county council leader Grant Davey for avoiding a meeting to raise the concerns.

But an emergency meeting has now been called. It will take place at County Hall in Morpeth on Friday at 9.30am.

The motion to be debated has been put forward by Conservative group leader Peter Jackson.

He is requesting the suspension of the decision and the introduction of a new consultation process.

Mr Jackson said: “The leader of the council Grant Davey can run but cannot hide from the electorate.

“He has been doing everything in his power to avoid public accountability. Labour have made a huge mistake with this teenage tax and we are asking them to revisit this decision which will be discussed at an extraordinary meeting of the council.”

But Mr Davey, leader of the council and the Labour group, accused the Tories of playing politics:

 “The extraordinary council meeting could end up costing the council tax payers over £40,000, which is a very expensive way to play gesture politics after their own government has raided Northumberland’s budget to the tune of £130m.

“It’s cynical, hypocritical and it goes to show that local Tories would rather spend than save money.”

Protestors met senior county council officers on Wednesday to express concern about the lack of engagement with the public.

Leading protestor Allison Joynson said: “Whilst I appreciate the officers taking the time to meet with us, and the fact that finally a dialogue has begun, it became quickly apparent that the Labour administration is not prepared to seriously consider revisiting this discriminatory policy.

“It was evident from the discussions that the council had no real appreciation of the huge impact on the people of Northumberland especially those from rural areas.”

The county council voted to scrap its free transport scheme for pupils over the age of 16 last month in a move which will save £2.4 million.

From September 1 students will pay the full cost where public transport is available, or £600 a year to travel on council contracted school transport.

Council bosses say they were forced to bring back charges as they have to remove £32m from the authority’s budget in 2014/15 and a further £100m over the next three years.

But furious parents in the rural north of the county say their children are being penalised for staying in education, and are calling on the administration to change its mind.

The pressure group opposing the plans has already staged a demonstration outside the Duchess Community High School in Alnwick and has circulated a petition demanding a rethink.

Source –  Berwick Advertiser,  05 July 2014

‘Teenage tax’ will leave parents £600 worse off

Youngsters from Tynedale wishing to stay on at school, or go to college, will have to pay £600 per year just to get there from September.

As expected, Northumberland County Council is scrapping free transport for sixth formers and college students, in order to save £2.4m per year.

That means youngsters starting in sixth form will have to pay £600 to travel on the same school bus they have used for free since the age of 9.

But the move has evoked Tory fury, as the opposition at County Hall has accused the ruling Labour group of imposing a tax on teenagers, which could put them off gaining qualifications.

I cannot believe that Labour are so willing to threaten the life chances of our young people with this teenage tax of theirs,” said Coun. Peter Jackson, leader of Northumberland Conservatives.

This excessive tax on our students and their families will put many off furthering their education at all.

Coun. Jackson said the intention appeared to be that the only college courses available to Northumberland students were those offered by Northumberland College at Ashington.

Coun. Jackson said: “This is an insult to the young people of this county.

“As we all know, Ashington is a most difficult place to access by public transport, if not impossible from some parts of Northumberland.

“The future prosperity of our county lies in the successful careers of our young people. Yet here we have a Labour-led council making the wrong choice.

“They are happy to protect the interests of a few at the top at the expense of those who live elsewhere.

“They plan to spend millions on a new county hall and a new leisure centre in Ashington, yet are not prepared to give all our young people an equal chance.”

Hexham’s Coun. Cath Homer said the “teenage tax” was a direct attack on local people and their children who are working hard to make ends meet.

She said: “We need to have young people able to access the best course in the best college to help them get the best chance in life.

“The Labour council has now imposed a take it or leave it plan which means only the richest will be able to have choice.

“This sends the wrong message to young people and could put the long term economic prosperity of the county at risk.

“I am very concerned that in years to come our young people will decide if Northumberland doesn’t value them, they will leave.”

The Tories were critical of the fact that the two Independent members of the council from Tynedale – Ovington’s Coun. Paul Kelly and Stocksfield’s Coun. Mrs Anne Dale – failed to back the Tory opposition to the proposal.

They pointed out that the £600 charge for school transport was the highest in the North-East.

County council leader Coun. Grant Davey said: “We do not make any cuts with relish. It is regrettable that we have to make any cuts, but we must balance our budget.

“Where we make cuts we will protect those in greatest need and continue to focus our resources on helping our county to grow. We will always do right by our communities.”

The new scheme will come into effect from September 1, but sixth formers already in the scheme will not be affected.

Special provision will be made to exempt the most vulnerable groups, such as students with special educational needs, or those from low income backgrounds, who attend their nearest appropriate school or college.

The average annual cost to the council of transport per student is currently in the region of £936 a year.

Northumberland is unusual among local authorities in that it still provides free transport for 16-19 year old students.

Durham County Council has already withdrawn its post-16 travel scheme and Cumbria County Council is also withdrawing the subsidy.

The number of Northumberland students claiming free transport has increased from 800 to 3,500 over the past five years, and 40 per cent of students travel to educational establishments outside the county.

Whilst the numbers of students claiming free travel has increased dramatically, the numbers of students from Northumberland attending post-16 education have remained static at around 7,000.

The council is now hoping that the withdrawal of free transport could lead to school sixth forms and colleges in Northumberland extending the range of courses they can offer.

Source –  Hexham Courant,  09 June 2014