Tagged: Pacers

Outdated Pacer trains WILL be scrapped – but civil servants objected to £250 million cost

Outdated and uncomfortable “Pacer” trains are to be axed from rail services in the North and replaced by 120 brand new vehicles, the Government has announced.

The decision to scrap the trains, which have been compared to cattle trucks, was made by Transport Secretary Patrick McLoughlin as he launched the contest inviting rail operators to bid to run the Northern and TransPennine Express franchises.

It brings to an end speculation that the vehicles could stay, or could be replaced by second hand trains from another part of the country.

But it also emerged that Mr McLoughlin faced a battle with civil servants – who argued that the £250 million cost of the new vehicles was poor value for money.

The Transport Secretary was forced to issue a “written directive”, a formal note confirming that he had been advised against requiring new trains but wanted his officials to go ahead anyway.

Mr McLoughlin told his staff that scrapping the Pacers was essential, warning: “I do not think that the continued use of these uncomfortable and low quality vehicles is compatible with our vision for economic growth and prosperity in the North.”

He also said that many Northern lines were unlikely to be electrified, so it was important to ensure new diesel trains were built because there is an industry-wide shortage of diesel vehicles.

It means the decision will now be scrutinised by a Commons spending watchdog, the Public Accounts Committee, but while this could potentially criticise Mr McLoughlin it does not have the power to over-rule him.

Pacers were introduced in the 1980s as a short-term solution to a lack of rolling stock. Their future had been unclear until now, with senior Ministers including the Prime Minister promising they would go, while a series of official Government documents stated they could instead be refurbished and remain in use.

The Northern franchise operates local, commuter and rural services throughout the region, and a number of long distance services linking major cities.

As well as replacing the pacers with new trains, the winner of the franchise will be expected to modernise other vehicles on the route, double the number of services on may routes, provide more off-peak and Sunday services, invest at least £30 million to improve stations and introduce free Wi-Fi on all Northern trains by 2020 at the latest.

Bidders for the franchise are Abellio Northern Ltd, Arriva Rail North Limited and Govia Northern Limited. They have until 26 June to submit their plans.

The TransPeninne Express franchise provides longer distance intercity-type services, connecting the major cities of Newcastle, Leeds, Sheffield, Manchester, Hull, Liverpool, Edinburgh and Glasgow, as well as Manchester Airport.

Improvements the government wants the bidders to introduce include introducing extra capacity for passengers through more carriages and more services; providing earlier and later services and more services on Sundays; considering options for new services such as extending Newcastle services to Edinburgh, and introducing free Wi-Fi on all TransPennine Express trains by 2020 at the latest.

The bidders are First Trans Pennine Express Limited, Keolis Go-Ahead Limited and Stagecoach Trans Pennine Express Trains Limited, and they must submit their proposals by 28 May 2015.

Both new franchises are due to start operating in April 2016.

Source – Newcastle Evening Chronicle, 27 Feb 2015

“North-East rail fares are high enough,” campaigners tell Prime Minister

Campaigners  have pointed out that rail tickets near the Prime Minister’s own constituency are cheaper that those in the North-East.

Teesside passenger group Coastliners spoke out after David Cameron said the region’s decrepit Pacer trains would be replaced – but fares would have to rise to pay for the new rolling stock.

It was revealed on Friday that the Prime Minister had declared that “those trains are going” when asked about the unpopular Pacers, which run on Northern Rail lines across the North of England.

Mr Cameron rejected his own Government’s suggestion that the 30-year-old carriages could be modernised rather than replaced.

Instead, bidders for the Northern franchise will be asked to draw up plans to replace the trains.

But the Prime Minister said fares must rise to pay for the upgrades when the new contracts start in 2016.

However, research by Coastliners, which represents rail passengers on the Durham coast, suggests it is a myth that North-East fares are cheaper than those elsewhere in the country.

Coastliners’ Peter Walker said:

“Don’t forget that Campaign for Better Transport‘s London-based staff have admitted that we in the North pay as much as if not more than those living further South.”

Billingham is just over seven miles from Hartlepool, and fares, usually by Pacer, are £3.40 day return, or £3.20 single.

Oxford to Tackley, nearly in Mr Cameron’s constituency, is nine miles, and the day return is £3.50, or £3.40 single.

“If the fares level decides what type of rolling stock is provided, his argument implies that Pacers should serve Tackley and Class 166 diesels should be sent to our coast line forthwith.”

Mr Walker pointed out savings to users of the Oyster card meant that many London journeys of similar length similar to, or greater than, those on the coast line were far cheaper :

London to East Croydon, some 13 miles, works out at £3 single for an Oyster-card holder.”

Mr Walker also questioned the Prime Minister’s claim that Northern Rail fares were the most heavily subsidised in the country.

 “It is worth comparing the levels of alleged subsidy per mile that apply in Wales and in Scotland.”

Source –  Northern Echo,  07 Nov 2014

TransPennine Express loses trains to ‘David Cameron’s stomping ground’

Passengers who use an already packed rail service which operates in the North East could face further overcrowding.

From next April, First TransPennine Express is set to lose nine of its 70 trains to Chiltern Railways in Oxfordshire, after it struck a train leasing deal with the company that owns them.

This week, Alistair Gordon, the UK boss of Keolis,  which owns a 45% stake in First TransPennine Express, said its line connecting Newcastle with Leeds, Manchester and Liverpool was so busy he recently saw a woman faint on board a train.

Mr Gordon reportedly commented: “Try getting on a train . . . and some days you just can’t.”

He said the problem was a chronic shortage of trains and that the company could not find extra carriages for its diesel services. “There is not enough rolling stock in this country,” he said.

Government figures show the franchise is one of the most overcrowded in the country after doubling its passenger numbers in a decade from 13.5m to 26m. Now it facing up to increasing passenger numbers with less trains.

First TransPennine Express leased the nine Class 170s from Porterbrook, a rolling stock operating company, for the duration of its franchise which has been extended for a year until 2016. Chiltern was able to offer a longer term leasing deal.

A spokesman claimed, although a solution has yet to be found for the problem, it would not affect its service in to the North East where it uses Class 185 rolling stock.

He denied suggestions some might be diverted to cope with the loss of the nine Class 170 carriages

Customers in the North East will see no change in terms of capacity and timetabling,” he said.

The spokesman said they were lobbying the Department for Transport to help find a solution.

It was only in May this year that ten new four-coach electric trains – costing £6 million each – started work on its route between Manchester, the North East and Scotland.

They offered 90,000 extra seats every week on all their North of England services, running one train every hour during the day between Manchester and Scotland and five trains every hour between Leeds and Manchester.

What we’re saying to the DfT is we need to protect the capacity we have put in place,” said the spokesman.

Mick Cash, general secretary of the RMT rail union, said:

“It is a shocking indictment of both this Government’s policies and two decades of privatisation that one of the most crowded franchises on the rail system is losing a large chunk of its fleet to routes around the stomping ground of David Cameron and his cronies.

“The internal rolling stock merry-go-round is robbing trains from the North to aid the South while the clapped-out, lashed-up Pacers are also being kept on as part of the new Northern and TPE franchise.

“What a disgraceful way to treat passengers who are paying through the nose to ride these highly-profitable services.

“With the re-privatisation of the East Coast Main Line being bulldozed through, despite the success of the public operation that has delivered a billion pounds back to the taxpayer, this madness is set to not only continue but to worsen.”

Meanwhile David Sidebottom, Director of Passenger Focus, an independent rail passenger watchdog, said:

Getting a seat, or even sometimes getting on a train, can be a struggle for some passengers as overcrowding on the railways grows. It is a particular problem with First TransPennine with just 55% of FTPE passengers telling us that they are satisfied with the availability of seats or space to stand, and this is getting worse.

“Passengers need to see more seats on TransPennine and other trains. And they will want to know when this issue will be resolved.”

Source –  Newcastle Journal. 14 Oct 2014