Tagged: North-East MP

Unite right to withhold MP cash says Ian Lavery

Union leaders are right to axe funds for Labour MPs who will not back them, a North East MP has said.

Wansbeck MP Ian Lavery, chair of the trade union group of Labour MPs, has said party leader Ed Miliband needs to realise the importance of having unions put the views of ordinary people into the party.

Labour’s left-wing powerbase in the North East has increasingly sided with the unions since Mr Miliband announced last year his intention to reform links with the party paymasters.

Now Wansbeck MP Mr Lavery has said Unite is right to stop paying out to MPs who will not back it.

Unite is paying out £3,000 a time to Labour MPs who backed the unions when party leader Mr Miliband proposed axing historic links.

That includes £3,000 for Easington’s Grahame Morris, who penned an article warning that “Miliband’s plans for the party’s affiliated trade union members are fraught with danger.”

They also handed funds to Blaydon MP Dave Anderson. The former union chairman said in the run-up to Mr Miliband’s union showdown that the party was busying itself with “navel-gazing” and had ended up “facing a period of review and a costly, time-consuming conference” instead of campaigning for votes.

Another £3,000 went to Gateshead MP Ian Mearns.

The MP was among those who refused to follow Labour party orders when he spoke out against the party’s plans to back the Tory cap on welfare payments.

Mr Lavery  –  “In recent times some members of parliament have sought to distance themselves from the trade unions and their members.

“They are very much entitled to do so. However, the unions are quite entitled to react by withdrawing constituency finance.

“I think it is basic, why would a union wish to expend its members’ money supporting MPs who don’t support them. It would be quite a ludicrous situation.”

Mr Lavery was building on his speech at Unite’s annual conference in Liverpool, where he said: “A lot of these MPs believe it was the Labour Party that introduced the trade unions rather than the fact that it was ordinary working people in trade unions that formed the Labour Party.

“At the beginning of the 1900s there were huge problems with the health service — we didn’t have the NHS. There were huge problems with wages, terms and conditions, with poverty, with child poverty.

“That’s why the Labour Party was formed — to give a voice to ordinary people in Parliament. That’s what the party leader should remember.”

Source – Newcastle Evening Chronicle,  08 July 2014

Racism and bigotry scare people from standing for Parliament, MPs warn

Women, people with disabilities and ethnic minorities may be put off taking part in Britain’s political system because of abuse or threats of physical attacks, a North East MP has warned.

Sharon Hodgson, Labour MP for Washington &  Sunderland West and the Shadow Equalities Minister, said attempts to make councils and Parliament more representative were being undermined by fears that candidates would face discrimination.

And she said that every party had to act to stamp out intimidation and prejudice in politics.

She was speaking as the Commons debated the findings of an inquiry which found candidates standing for election need protection from racist, Islamaphobic and anti-semitic attempts to smear them.

The findings were published by the All-Party Parliamentary Inquiry into Electoral Conduct.

Jeremy Beecham, who led Newcastle City Council  for 17 years and is now a Labour peer, revealed that he had faced anti-semitic campaigning from political opponents when he first stood as a councillor in the city in 1967.

The inquiry also highlighted the case of Parmjit Dhanda, a former Labour MP, whose children found a severed pig’s head outside his house after his election defeat in 2010.

Gay rights group Stonewall highlighted a number of incidents of homophobic behaviour by candidates from many parties including an example from 2007 in which a Labour party council candidate with parliamentary ambitions, Miranda Grell, labelled her opponent a paedophile.

Ms Grell was convicted in 2007 by magistrates in Waltham Forest of two counts of making false statements about another candidate.

Mrs Hodgson told MPS: “None of us goes into politics without the fear of attack, and none of us is immune from attack on some level; but we should always expect any attacks on us to be based on choices or decisions that we have made, the things we have said, the way we have voted, or what we have done.”

But she warned: “I am sure that for many candidates the threat of their skin colour, background or faith – not to mention their children’s or relatives’- being turned into smears or innuendo or leading to harassment or abuse such as we have heard about today is a real consideration. I worry that the fear I have described will mean that many excellent candidates never seek their local party’s nomination or get the chance to be elected.”

The number of MPs in the House of Commons from ethnic minority backgrounds has increased. After the 2010 General Election there were 27 minority ethnic MPs, 12 more than in the previous Parliament.

It means 4.2% of MPs are from an an ethnic minority compared to 17.9% of the UK population as a whole.

The 2010 census of local councillors in England, carried out by the Local Government Association, showed that 4% came from an ethnic minority background, compared to 20% of the English population as a whole.

Equalities Minister Helen Grant said: “The inquiry on electoral conduct was thorough and detailed and made recommendations to a number of bodies, including the Electoral Commission, the police and political parties. Building its findings into current work and guidance and working with the right organisations is the best way to ensure that political life becomes a battle of ideas, not of race hate and discrimination.”

Source –  Newcastle Journal,

MP raises fears over planned mental health service changes

A North East MP has entered the row over proposed changes to mental health services that will see scores of jobs lost in the North East.

Wansbeck MP Ian Lavery says vulnerable patients and their families are left feeling abandoned by plans to alter the way that important services are delivered in the region.

Controversial plans have been made by Northumberland, Tyne and Wear NHS Foundation Trust to close mental health wards, relocate service and develop new units.

Mr Lavery said: “I have met with a number of my constituents who use the services and they feel that they are being abandoned by the mental health trust.

“It really concerns me the planned changes that have been made. We cannot sit back and say that everything is fine because the reality is that it is not. These changes will put real and increased strain on patients and their families.

“We cannot get rid of such critical services. It would appear that these changes are being made to cut costs with patients not being the main focus.”

Under the proposals, as many as 169 frontline NHS posts will be axed and more than 90 beds reduced as more care is delivered in the community.

Each year since 2010, the trust has been required to make savings of approximately £12m while meeting the same levels of demand.

Health chiefs are adamant that the proposals will significantly improve patient care while delivering cost savings to ensure services remain viable in the long-term.

James Duncan, acting chief executive of Northumberland, Tyne and Wear NHS Foundation Trust said: “We have listened very carefully to the feedback we have received from service users, carers and our partners in recent years so that we can play our part in providing the best modern mental health services for local people, designed around their needs.

“Building on this, we have embarked on a challenging transformation programme to ensure that our services continue to be high quality, are easier to access and provide the best value for money.

“It is important to remember that the vast majority of people who use our services are supported in the community, with only about 3% needing to spend time in hospital. Alongside changes to inpatient services, we have also seen significant improvements in mental health services locally.”

Staff at the health trust have undergone a consultation process and a number of public engagement events have taken place to discuss the proposals.

It is expected that all the changes will be in place within the next two to three years.

Source –  Newcastle Journal   05 May 2014

Newcastle can form an “economic powerhouse” with Glasgow and Edinburgh after Scottish independence

Alex Salmond has raised the prospect of Newcastle teaming up with Glasgow and Edinburgh to form an “economic powerhouse” pushing for influence.

The Scottish First Minister told an audience in New York that while he has “no territorial ambitions” on Northumberland or the North East, he does see the sense in teaming up with the region on issues such as High Speed Rail.

Mr Salmond said that plans to build the new railway line from London up to the North showed the bias in the UK, and questioned why the line could not be built from North to South instead, joining up major Northern and Scottish cities along the way.

That transport focus prompted one North East MP to last night call on the First Minister to “put his money where his mouth is” on dualling of the A1 north of Newcastle and through Scotland.

Speaking at an event organised by US paper the Wall Street Journal, Mr Salmond said: “I have no territorial demands but we have encouraged a borderlands initiative, about economic cooperation between the North of England and Scotland.

“The North East and the North West get the hind end of just about everything, the worst deal.

“We have a parliament in Scotland we have our own economic initiatives, that’s not the case for the North of England.

“What sort of initiatives could we have? Well, transport for a start. Fast rail is coming, the greatest misnomer of all time, fast rail in the UK means something that will take 40 years to build.

“But the important point is that it is being built from south to north. It would be a rather interesting concept to see it built from north to south, the advantages there of the combinations of the great city conurbations of Glasgow, Edinburgh and for example Newcastle, which would present an interesting economic powerhouse.

“So cooperation doesn’t depend on territorial ambitions.”

Hexham MP Guy Opperman, a campaigner in the Better Together group, said: “All of us would welcome any action by the Scottish Government to improve transport links from Edinburgh to the North East, whether that is dualling the A1 north of the border or a commitment to High Speed rail from Edinburgh to Newcastle.

“But I would urge Mr Salmond to put his money where his mouth is.”

In Newcastle, council leader Nick Forbes has already met with Alex Salmond in Newcastle to discuss High Speed Rail, alongside visits to Edinburgh and Glasgow councils.

He said: “I strongly believe that the North East needs to be around the table discussing how we get the best deal for the region after the referendum.

“The Borderlands initiative shows we’re working closely with Scotland on a range of issues, and it is interesting to hear how much Scotland values its links with cities like Newcastle. It’s not all just about London.”

Source – Newcastle Journal   12 April 2014

‘Bones of Richard III would be declared fit for work’

A North-East MP has said the remains of Richard III would struggle to pass the Government’s too-strict ‘fit for work’ criteria.

Thousands of benefit claimants are dying within six weeks of being wrongly assessed as being fit to work because of the Government’s “scandalous” welfare reforms, the Commons heard today.

Gateshead Labour MP Ian Mearns compared the coalition to “oppressive regimes in Central and Latin America”, blaming ministers for misdiagnosing at least 10,600 sick and disabled people as being fit for work.

Speaking during a backbench business debate on welfare reform, he said: “Put bluntly, this Government, the Department for Work and Pensions and their agencies are telling us repeatedly that people who are dying are fit for work.

“Between January 2011 and November 2011 some 10,600 Employment and Support Allowance (ESA) claims ended and the date of death was recorded within six weeks of the claim end.

“This Government has repeatedly refused to release updated 2013 (figures) for deaths within six weeks of an end of an ESA claim.”

Mr Mearns added: “Four people a day are dying within six weeks of being declared fit for work under the Work Capability Assessments.

“It is scandalous – scandalous and an indictment of this place.”

He suggested that the remains of Richard III would also struggle to pass the Government’s strict criteria.

He told the House: “Some might consider this bad taste, but I’m told there was a story doing the rounds, that when the bones of Richard III were discovered in Leicester, Atos carried out an assessment and judged him fit for work.

“It would be funny if it wasn’t so sad.

“It’s a sad truth faced by 12,000-plus families who, every year, have to face their own personal tragedy of this nature.

“In my youth, I never would have imagined that in 2014 it would be the United Kingdom that would be the subject of an Amnesty campaign.

“Yet at its AGM in 2013, Amnesty UK passed a resolution recognising the human rights of sick and disabled people in the United Kingdom had been dreadfully compromised.”

Source – Shields Gazette,  27 Feb 2014