Tagged: named and shamed

North-East businesses which are paying below the minimum wage

More businesses in the North-East have been ‘named and shamed’ by the Government for not paying the national minimum wage.

The businesses were revealed by Business Minister Jo Swinson and included employers not complying with minimum wage rules and having arrears of more than £100 owing to staff.

Those named and who are based in the region were:

  • Mrs Karen Aitken, trading as Angel Hair Design, of Gainford, Darlington, neglecting to pay £703.33 to a worker
  • Mrs Deborah Adcock, trading as LJ Beauty and Hair, of Seaham, neglecting to pay £463.60 to a worker
  • Inn2inns Ltd, of Hemlington, Middlesbrough, neglecting to pay £323.10 to two workers
  • Mr Assad Madani, trading as Dona Papa Pizza, in Chester-le-Street, neglecting to pay £101.64 to a worker

The Department for Business, Innovation and Skills, which published the 70 strong list, said each case had been “thoroughly investigated” by Her Majesty’s Revenue and Customs (HMRC).

Ms Swinson said: “Paying less than the minimum wage is illegal, immoral and completely unacceptable.

 

“Naming and shaming gives a clear warning to employers who ignore the rules that they will face reputational consequences as well as financial penalties of up to £20,000 if they don’t pay the minimum wage.”

The GMB union said there were still far too few “wage dodging employers” being brought to justice and “bucket loads of evidence” that big firms in particular could afford to pay more.

The Government said it was increasing HMRC’s enforcement budget by a further £3m a year in a bid to recover hundreds of thousands of pounds owed to workers.

The GMB also said a wage offenders register should be kept by Company House with those on it deemed unfit to hold further directorships.

The current national minimum wage for those aged 21 and over is £6.50 an hour, although the Low Pay Commission yesterday recommended to ministers it increases by 20p to £6.70 an hour.

COMPANIES NATIONALLY PAYING LESS THAN THE MINIMUM WAGE

  • East Midlands Crossroads – Caring for Carers, Nottingham, neglected to pay £37,592.56 to 184 workers.
  • Delcom Systems Ltd, Salisbury neglected to pay £11,731.52 to a worker.
  • S Hanns LLP, Chatham neglected to pay £8,448.84 to a worker.
  • The Apostolic Church trading as James Kane Nursery, London, neglected to pay £8,347.71 to 2 workers.
  • Young Friends Nursery Ltd, Hove, neglected to pay £6,789.71 to a worker.
  • Station Garage (Little Weighton) Ltd, Little Weighton neglected to pay £5,440.77 to 2 workers.
  • KRCS (Digital Solutions) Ltd, Nottingham, neglected to pay £5,161.85 to 5 workers.
  • Mrs Shirley Elvin trading as Seaton Garage & Engineering Co, Hull, neglected to pay £4,840.31 to a worker.
  • Pontcanna Hair Studio Ltd, Cardiff, neglected to pay £4,784.34 to a worker.
  • Carol Ann Daker trading as Swan Hill House Residential Home, Shropshire, neglected to pay £4,395.78 to 27 workers.
  • Hobby Horse Ltd, Plymouth, neglected to pay £4,049.31 to a worker.
  • Fylde Coast Pizza Ltd trading as Papa Johns, Blackpool, neglected to pay £3,949.62 to 14 workers.
  • Manleys Ltd, Belfast, neglected to pay £3,797.83 to 3 workers.
  • J B Howard and Son Ltd, Leyland, neglected to pay £3,469.96 to 7 workers.
  • Mr L Tolman & Mr S Blanchard trading as Mardi Gras Hotel, Blackpool, neglected to pay £3,206.76 to 3 workers.
  • Stafforce Personnel Ltd, Rotherham, neglected to pay £3,044.79 to 63 workers.
  • Best Start Ltd trading as Tiny Treasures Day Care Nursery, Birmingham, neglected to pay £2,928.95 to two workers.
  • Maybury Automotive Ltd, Woking, neglected to pay £2,670.88 to 2 workers.
  • C&R Tyres Ltd, Kelso, neglected to pay £2,261.60 to 3 workers.
  • SSE PLC, Perth neglected to pay £2,233.95 to 5 workers.
  • Encore Envelopes Ltd, Washington, neglected to pay £2,060.09 to a worker.
  • SmileyWorld Ltd, London, neglected to pay £1,729.00 to a worker.
  • Mancroft Ltd, Leeds, neglected to pay £1,172.97 to 3 workers.
  • Kevin & Bernadette Farrell trading as Derrygonnelly Autos, Enniskillen, neglected to pay £1,690.35 to a worker.
  • Delves Food & Wine Stop Ltd trading as Loco, Walsall, neglected to pay £1,152.48 to a worker.
  • Webe (Chelmsford) Ltd, Chelmsford, neglected to pay £1,521.98 to 4 workers.
  • Gregson Lane Garage Ltd, Preston, neglected to pay £1,431.57 to 2 workers.
  • Ms Julie Ann Wright trading as The Worx, Portadown, neglected to pay £1,110.60 to a worker.
  • Mr S Partridge & Ms M Shead trading as Cobblers Fine Sandwiches & Pastries, Wakefield, neglected to pay £1,003.83 to a worker.
  • Mr Phillip Campbell & Mrs Lorraine Campbell trading as Supervalu Kells, Ballymena, neglected to pay £905.86 to 2 workers.
  • Mr C Pask trading as Pask Hair & Beauty, Derby, neglected to pay £900.00 to 2 workers.
  • J&G Salon Ltd trading as Jealousi & Garlands, Tamworth, neglected to pay £881.28 to a worker.
  • Faster Fit Tyres Ltd, Scunthorpe, neglected to pay £719.30 to a worker.
  • Mrs Karen Aitken trading as Angel Hair Design, Darlington, neglected to pay £703.33 to a worker.
  • Clearshot Ltd, Manchester, neglected to pay £684.94 to a worker.
  • Everest Express Ltd, Lincoln, neglected to pay £657.03 to a worker.
  • Leisure Emporium Ltd trading as Brown’s Cafe Bar & Bistro, Nottingham, neglected to pay £643.86 to a worker.
  • Mrs S Walker trading as Alleyways Fish & Chips, Scarborough, neglected to pay £601.59 to a worker.
  • Gary & Toni Valentine trading as The Harbour Inn, Seaton, neglected to pay £584.42 to a worker.
  • Shreeji Barnsley Ltd trading as Coffee Delight, Buxton, neglected to pay £555.70 to a worker.
  • Rowe Sparkes Solicitors Ltd, Southsea, neglected to pay £530.96 to a worker.
  • Fish Hairdressing Company Ltd, trading as Fish Hairdressing, Maidstone neglected to pay £521.82 to 3 workers.
  • Mrs Deborah Adcock trading as LJ Beauty & Hair, Seaham, neglected to pay £463.60 to a worker.
  • D&D Dies Ltd, Nottingham, neglected to pay £446.37 to a worker.
  • G Joynson, D Joynson and C Joynson trading as Headquarters, Withernsea, neglected to pay £430.07 to a worker.
  • Matchesfashion Ltd, London, neglected to pay £375.61 to 2 workers.
  • Colin Saich trading as Lindcoly Kennels, Bury St. Edmunds, neglected to pay £338.41 to 9 workers.
  • Inn2inns Ltd, Middlesbrough, neglected to pay £323.10 to 2 workers.
  • 99p Land Ltd, Swindon, neglected to pay £315.26 to a worker.
  • General Tarleton Ltd, Knaresborough, neglected to pay £300.62 to 6 workers.
  • Western Computer Group Ltd, Bristol, neglected to pay £287.54 to a worker.
  • Matrix Electrical Engineering Ltd, Harlow neglected to pay £286.60 to a worker.
  • Honeybees Childcare Ltd, Preston, neglected to pay £276.30 to a worker.
  • Mr G J Pearce trading as Sheppards Wood Service Station, Nottingham, neglected to pay £268.56 to a worker.
  • The Mirrors Ltd, Manchester, neglected to pay £262.87 to a worker.
  • A1 Techsol Ltd, Manchester, neglected to pay £233.47 to a worker.
  • Mrs J Cole trading as Rayleigh Retreat, Rayleigh £231.73 to a worker.
  • Hamlet Homes Properties Ltd, Westcliff-on-Sea neglected to pay £226.40 to a worker.
  • Smartmove Property Specialists Ltd, Aldershot, neglected to pay £206.36 to a worker.
  • EYFS Ltd trading as Oak Tree Day Nursery, London, neglected to pay £181.41 to a worker.
  • Mr & Mrs P Munn trading as Merry Maids of the Weald, Tonbridge, neglected to pay £169.56 to a worker.
  • Mr H Singleton trading as Willowbank Builders, Huddersfield, neglected to pay £163.89 to a worker.
  • Professional Referral Services Ltd, Wigan, neglected to pay £156.93 to 2 workers.
  • Amtec Computer Corporation Ltd, Ferndown, neglected to pay £149.64 to a worker.
  • Lychgate Coffee Ltd, Wolverhampton, neglected to pay £124.39 to a worker.
  • Finite International Logistics Ltd, Penarth, neglected to pay £119.92 to a worker.
  • Drummonds Ltd, Manchester, neglected to pay £113.58 to a worker.
  • Grove Mechanical Services Ltd, Magherafelt, neglected to pay £107.00 to 2 workers.
  • Lin Chinese Takeaway Ltd, Stoke-on-Trent, neglected to pay £103.00 to a worker.
  • Mr Assad Madani trading as Donapapa Pizza, Durham, neglected to pay £101.64 a worker.

The current National Minimum Wage rates are:

Adult rate (21 and over)  – £6.50 per hour
18-20 year olds – £5.13 per hour
16-17 year olds – £3.79 per hour
Apprentice rate – £2.73 per hour

The apprentice rate applies to apprentices aged 16-18 and those aged 19 and over who are in their first year. All other apprentices are entitled to the National Minimum Wage rate for their age.

Source – Northern Echo,  24 Feb 2014

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Iain Duncan Smith Starving The Poor Into Committing Crime, Says Labour MP

Veteran Labour MP Michael Meacher has launched a stinging attack against Iain Duncan Smith (IDS), accusing the Work and Pensions Secretary of denying poor people food and shelter and pushing them into stealing to survive.

Writing on his blog Mr Meacher said:

“The papers are full-on when members or ex-members of the government make a fool of themselves behaving badly when they can’t get their way – Andrew Mitchell foul-mouthing a policeman with the toxic ‘plebs’ allegedly added in because he couldn’t ride his bike through the No.10 gates, and David Mellor ranting at a black cab driver over the best route home to his £8m pad near Tower Bridge.

“But what really matters about members of the government is not their silly misbehaviour, it’s they [sic] way they’re crucifying millions of people even to the point where they’re denying them food and shelter.

“On this, with a few honourable exceptions, the media are largely silent on the grounds presumably that they don’t matter because they’re not famous.

“A million people have been sanctioned by government ministers over this last year, which means that they are deprived of all their benefit for often petty infringements (e.g. being 5 minutes late for a job interview) and hence have no money for at least 4 weeks and sometimes 3 months, forcing them to steal to survive.

If they’re caught, the penalty for stealing some meat from a supermarket might be a fine of some £200 which of course they cannot conceivably pay, or it might be 6 weeks in prison.

“IDS supervises the sanctioning (though it’s outsourced to a privatised firm doing his dirty work for him), while Grayling takes care of the imprisonment.

“This is the treadmill of impoverishment to which this government is now sentencing hundreds of thousands of people every year, a crescendo of wanton harshness out of all proportion to the treatment meted out to other miscreants.

“During and after the Napoleonic wars there were up to 200 offences for which a person could be hanged, usually for stealing to keep their family alive.

“The people of this country sitting on the juries finally got round this draconian repression imposed by the ruling class by refusing to convict. That is what juries and magistrates should do now when faced by the stark injustice of the criminal justice system.

“MPs who 5 years ago stole big ticket expenses to which they were not entitled, including many on both front benches, suffered no penalty worse than being named and shamed in the newspapers, with no more than half a dozen fall-guys, not the main offenders, sent to prison for a few weeks.

“Not a single banker has been prosecuted for presiding over the wrecking of the financial and economic system by the most brazen arrogance, recklessness and incompetence, even though it has ravaged the lives of millions of innocent people.

“None of the super-rich who have been avoiding due payment of taxes by the most artificial forms of contrivance have ever been personally brought to book and sent down.

“We are now seeing one law for the rich and another for the poor in its most vicious and nasty form.”

Source –  Welfare Weekly,  01 Dec 2014

http://www.welfareweekly.com/iain-duncan-smith-starving-poor-committing-crime-says-labour-mp/

North-East needs a pay rise, says TUC

TUC General Secretary Frances O’Grady explains why North-East workers need a pay rise.

Next Tuesday, April 1 will mark the fifteenth anniversary of the minimum wage – a historic milestone in British labour history.

Before its introduction in 1999 some workers were being paid as little as £1 an hour. The minimum wage has helped to end such abuse. It has proved to be a vital safeguard for employees across the North-East.

The Low Pay Commission recommends the level of the minimum wage. Its first ever chair Sir George Bain said last month “with more than one in five workers in Britain suffering from low pay, it’s time to talk about how we strengthen the minimum wage for the years ahead.”

Sir George is right. The minimum wage has undoubtedly lifted many out of extreme low pay, but research shows that many employees start work on the minimum wage and then stay there – failing to lift their pay above the minimum even after years at work.

In the North-East over 75,000 workers are on the minimum wage. Many are likely to stay on this rate for a large part of their working lives.

Lifting the minimum wage above inflation as politicians of all parties now support will help these. But many employers could do more by adopting the higher voluntary minimum standard known as the living wage – set at £7.65 an hour.

But it is not just those on low pay who have been left behind. New TUC research shows that the gap between the top ten per cent of wage earners and average pay in the North-East has grown by 5.3 per cent since 2000.

This should worry everyone. Those with the biggest pay packets may dismiss this as the politics of envy, but income inequality is bad for the whole economy. It helped drive the financial crash as banks lent the savings of the wealthiest to those in the middle who took out credit to keep up their living standards.

 For all the talk of economic recovery workers in the North-East are still seeing their pay fall in real terms and are, on average, £40 a week worse off than they were in 2009.

For some the pay squeeze has been even sharper. To take just one example, academic staff at the universities of Durham, Teesside, Newcastle, Northumbria and Sunderland have seen real-terms pay cuts of 13 per cent over the last five years.  And this is just one instance of jobs that were once secure and decently paid slowly being turned into insecure work that can no longer deliver the living standards once thought fair.

This real wage squeeze is a key aspect of a wider cost of living crisis. Energy bills have risen three times faster than inflation over the last decade, while rail fares rose above inflation yet again this January.
Childcare and housing costs have also grown as a share of average income.

People are now spending over a third of their disposable income on essentials such as food and fuel. People think of the cost of living crisis in terms of prices but the main cause of the problem is that their wages are not going far enough anymore.

So can we do something about it? Or is it just an inevitable fact of life that living standards are in decline and that for the first time in history future generations will have lower living standards than their parents?

Economic growth alone is not the answer. The economy has grown by £60bn in the last four years but real household disposable income has barely increased. Disposable incomes have fallen by nearly £500 per person.

A first step is bolder increases to the minimum wage. Had it kept pace with prices since 2007 full-time minimum wage workers would be nearly £800 a year better off. We need to make up this lost ground but also ensure that companies who illegally pay staff less than the minimum wage face the full force of the law – including being publicly named and shamed.

Secondly, we need an increased commitment to the living wage from employers in the public and private sector so that their own staff, as well as those in their supply chains, can have a decent standard of living.

Employers in many sectors can afford to pay more without job losses. That’s why we need to find new ways for employers and unions to work together to set higher wages, agreed at a sector level by modern wages councils, so that workers and businesses can both get a fair deal.

More collective bargaining can stop employers skimping on pay and get wages rising back in line with prices. Even the International Monetary Fund (hardly known for its radicalism) concedes that the decline of collective bargaining has increased wage inequality and reduced wages for ordinary people.

This month the TUC is organising Fair Pay Fortnight – a series events and street stalls throughout the North-East – to raise awareness about Britain’s cost of living crisis.

We need to put fair pay at the top of the political agenda and ensure that policymakers and employers create more high-quality jobs to boost productivity and raise people’s living standards. People need more money in their pockets if local economies are to thrive.

The North-East needs a pay rise.

Source – Northern Echo, 26 March 2014

Universal Jobmatch Still Riddled With Illegal Unpaid Work

the void

uj-unpaid-work“Not paying the National Minimum Wage is illegal and if an employer breaks the law, government will take tough action,”

“Anyone considered a worker under the law should be paid at least the minimum wage, whether they are an intern, or someone on work experience.”

Employment Relations Minister Jo Swinson MP

The Government job-seeking website Universal Jobmatch is still littered with illegal unpaid work despite David Cameron’s claims that companies who fail to pay the minimum wage will be ‘named and shamed’.

Many employers are using the site to offer unpaid work experience roles or internships such as this advertisement calling for”extremely hardworking” graduates to work in exchange for lunch and travel expenses.

Unless unpaid work experience positions form part of a formal Jobcentre scheme they are illegal under minimum wage laws.  The law is very clear and guidance on who is entitled to receive the minimum wage can be…

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