Tagged: Malcolm Rifkind

Should MPs be paid more? – Salary set to rise after the general election

Would Sir Malcolm Rifkind and Jack Straw have been caught out in a sting apparently offering their services to a private company for cash if the salary earned by MPs’ was much higher?

> Probably. There’s no accounting for greed.

The suggestion is an unpopular one with the electorate, many of whom have endured years of pay freezes, particularly in the public sector in which the politicians are classified as working.

After the next election, an MP’s salary is set to rise 10% from £66,396 to £74,000 – the level set by the Independent Parliamentary Standards Authority (Ipsa) which said they did an important job and should not be paid a “miserly amount”.

When this was revealed last year it caused a bit of a meltdown inside and outside of Parliament with the Conservative, Liberal Democrat and Labour party leaders for once united.

They argued it would be wrong when public sector pay rises were capped at 1%.

Rifkind, who said the allegations made against him were “unfounded”, has subsequently said he can’t live on his £67,000 a year MP’s salary.

However Blaydon MP, Labour’s Dave Anderson, was unsympathetic. He said:

“If you can’t live on the salary get another job. You know what you sign up for.

“If you can’t live off £67,000 a year you must be from another planet.”

Mr Anderson was equally dismissive of MPs who took on second jobs to boost their income.

“If you want another job, take another job and leave. You shouldn’t have a second job as an MP regardless.

“Me and my colleagues work so many hours I don’t know how anybody who fit another job in.”

His fellow MP Nick Brown who represents Newcastle East said:

“I agree with that. Your duty is to your constituency and the country.

“I’ve been an MP for 31 years and have never had a second job.”

As for the salary of MPs he said he did not want to be “sanctimonious” and criticise anybody who thinks it should be higher. “I think an MP’s salary level should be set independently,” he said.

As for how much a fair salary would be, Mr Brown wouldn’t be drawn on a figure just that it should “cover the cost of being an MP.

> Before exopenses claims, I imagine.

The debate about what an MP’s salary should be has been clouded by a number of scandals over the years to the extent that when a rise is suggested most in Parliament come out in public against it firmly.

 

But in a secret poll of MPs, the responses were different.

Back in 2013, in a survey conducted by Ipsa, MPs suggested they deserved an £86,250 salary.

On average, Tories said their salary should be £96,740, while Lib Dems thought the right amount was £78,361 and Labour £77,322. Other parties put the figure at £75,091.

However later that year, a poll of the public revealed it thought MPs should actually get a pay cut, the average figure being £54,400. In the North East, people thought they should be paid £52,140.

Arguments for the rise included one that being an MP was an important job and salaries should be more in keeping with this, comparing it to money earned by company executives. If pay was better, we would get better MPs.

> Does anyone really believe that ? What we’d really get is richer MPs.

It would also, the argument went, entice more people from less well-off backgrounds to become interested in becoming an MP.

To counter this some have wondered how a salary that is around three times the national average would put off potential less well off candidates.

According to one commentator: “To a working class kid a salary of £65,000 a year is the equivalent of winning the lottery”.

And anyway, MPs are public servants and should be subject to the same rules as anyone else in the public sector. They do an incredibly important job – but so do lots of other people, such as nurses and the police.

Political expert Dr Martin Farr of Newcastle University said:

“The public has unreasonable expectations of politicians because they just don’t like them.

> And I wonder why that should be ?

“There needs to be a competitive salary as in comparison to parliamentarians elsewhere, MPs here aren’t played a lot nor do they get the same level of support.”

“They are frightened to be awarded a competitive salary which was why they tried to make it up in allowances in the first place.

“However in trying to avoid one problem they have created another.”

He said such was the “febrile” nature of the debate, the public generally can’t even accept the need for MPs to travel first class on trains and reclaim it on expenses.

“Yet they often do work of a confidential nature at this time so these arrangements are needed,” he said.

Dr Farr said that while it appears Straw and Rifkind might have broken no rules, they were foolish to do what they did.

However he added what did need to be sorted out was the so-called ‘Whitehall revolving door’ situation where former Ministers get jobs in the private sector

“It’s a toxic issue and in some ways MPs are in a lose-lose situation,” he said.

> For that sort of money, you’d get a lot of volunteers willing to risk that kind of lose-lose situation…

Source – Newcastle Evening Chronicle, 25 Feb 2015

Thatcher warned to break off relations with shadowy adviser who claimed to have masterminded miners’ defeat

Margaret Thatcher was privately warned to break off relations with a shadowy adviser who claimed to have masterminded the defeat of the miners’ strike, according to newly released government papers.

Files released by the National Archives at Kew, west London, show officials feared David Hart – a wealthy Old Etonian property developer – was exploiting his links with No 10 for his own ends.

They warned that unless the Prime Minister severed her links with him, he would end up causing her “grave embarrassment“.

The flamboyant Mr Hart had managed to ingratiate himself with Mrs Thatcher with his enthusiasm for her free market policies, offering informal advice on a range of issues, but it was during the miners’ strike, which began in 1984, that he came into his own.

From his suite at Claridges, he established himself as a go-between between Mrs Thatcher and National Coal Board chairman Ian MacGregor while making regular forays to the coalfields in support of the working miners in his chauffeur-driven Mercedes.

He was said to have bankrolled the breakaway Union of Democratic Mineworkers and organised the legal action by working miners which led to the strike by Arthur Scargill‘s National Union of Mineworkers strike being ruled illegal.

He later boasted that Mrs Thatcher came to rely on him completely, claiming: “It got to the point where she really let me run it.”

While the true extent of his influence has been questioned, the files show that by the time the strike was drawing to a close in 1985 there was mounting concern in Downing Street about his activities.

In February 1985 Mrs Thatcher’s political secretary Stephen Sherbourne wrote to warn her that while Mr Hart had proved “useful” in the past, he had begun to pursue his own agenda, briefing against ministers like Energy Secretary Peter Walker.

 “Though DH has on occasions provided you with useful intelligence he has recently been pursuing his own ends at the expense of those of the Government,” he wrote.

“For example, while professing total loyalty to you, he has not shrunk from denigrating Peter Walker’s activities even though the latter was carrying out the line agreed with you and ministers.

 “DH has his own views on how the coal strike should end and has been pursuing his cause even when it conflicted with the interests of yourself and Peter Walker. And in so doing he has exploited his No 10 connection.”

He said that Mr Hart had even sought to interpose himself as an intermediary with the White House in discussions over Ronald Reagan‘s “Star Wars” strategic defence initiative, and warned that he may try to interfere in Northern Ireland as well.

“So long as he feels he can telephone me regularly on whatever issue, so long will there be a risk of grave embarrassment to you,” he wrote.

“I think therefore we must consider how we sever the link with DH in a way which is clear to him but does not unduly offend him.”

In the event the link was abruptedly broken not long afterwards when a misjudged attempt by Mr Hart to lobby the Americans on behalf of a British defence supplier resulted in the contract they were seeking being awarded to the French.

He nevertheless re-emerged in the 1990s as an adviser to Conservative defence secretaries Malcolm Rifkind and Michael Portillo.

Source –  Durham Times,  30 Dec 2014