Tagged: Justin Welby.

Archbishop of York defends churches paying below Living Wage

The Archbishop of York, who chaired the Living Wage Commission, has defended parish churches paying below the minimum hourly rate.

Speaking during a visit to the North-East, Dr John Sentamu said churches that could afford to pay the Living Wage, currently £7.85 an hour outside London, should do so, but rejected suggestions it should be made mandatory.

The Church of England was criticised recently for advertising jobs at sub-Living Wage levels, a number of bishops having just backed the campaign. Justin Welby, the Archbishop of Canterbury, said the revelation was “embarrassing”.

Speaking  in Durham yesterday , Dr Sentamu said:

“Where people are capable of paying the Living Wage, they should do it.

“In my diocese, we do. In my office, we do. Many other church groups do. I believe the FT 100 index ought to be.

“But there are some small businesses where if that became mandatory, they may go under.”

Whenit was suggested the Anglican Church was neither small nor new, the Archbishop said:

“Every Parochial Church Council is a charity in its own right. Every cathedral is a charity in its own right. People talk about the church as if it’s one huge organisation. No, every church has its own governance.

 “My plea to every church is: please, examine yourself carefully. If you can pay the Living Wage, please for heaven’s sake get on and pay it.

“If you can’t, tell your employees why you’re delaying and when you hope to arrive at a Living Wage.”

Dr Sentamu was speaking after delivering the annual Borderlands Lecture at Durham University.

He told a 150-strong audience at St John’s College that more employers should pay the Living Wage, to support the working poor not “well paid people like me”.

In a wide ranging 45-minute address, he railed against resource, economic, political, social and community injustice, saying society was at a moral, economic and spiritual crossroads and in need of moral, economic and social transformation.

Dr Sentamu also spoke of the “barbarity” of Islamic State, saying they were “using God as a weapon of mass destruction”.

> Well, that’s an accusation that could never be levelled against Christianity….

 His main theme was in support of restorative justice, where offenders and victims jointly decide on how to respond to a crime.

We all bear some collective responsibility for crime, he said, and instead of asking what law has been broken, who broke it and what they deserve, the justice system should ask: who has been hurt, what are their needs and who is obliged to meet their needs.

> Perhaps the Archbish might like to bend the ear of a certain Iain Duncan Smith on that point…

Source – Northern Echo, 07 Mar 2014

Food bank study peer slammed for claiming ‘poor people don’t know how to cook’

A Conservative peer sparked anger yesterday when she suggested the poor were going hungry because they “don’t know how to cook”.

Baroness Jenkin of Kennington was forced to apologise for the comment, made at the launch of a landmark study into the explosion in food bank use.

The gaffe came as the Department for Work & Pensions (DWP) – criticised for benefit delays and harsh sanctions – appeared to snub the launch of the report, by the Archbishop of Canterbury.

And Work and Pensions Secretary Iain Duncan Smith came under fire for denying he had refused to meet the Trussell Trust, which runs most food banks, when it insisted he had.

At the Westminster event, Lady Jenkin, who served on the inquiry team, blamed hunger on, in part, a lack of knowledge about how to create cheap and nourishing meals.

She said:

“We have lost our cooking skills – poor people don’t know how to cook. I had a large bowl of porridge today, which cost 4p. A large bowl of sugary cereals will cost you 25p.”

Her comments immediately drew stinging criticism from across the region.

Councillor Peter Brookes, who helps run food banks in the Trimdon area of County Durham, said:

“It shows she hasn’t got a full understanding of the difficulties people who use food banks face. They don’t have the same choices as people like the Baroness to go out and buy fresh fruit and vegetables.”

Volunteers at the Hambleton Food Share initiative in Northallerton said hunger stemmed from sanctions on benefits, addictions, marriage breakdown and mental health issues – rather than a lack of cooking knowledge.

Scheme coordinator, Margaret Brice said many food bank users are unable to cook due to the issues they face, adding: “These are people in a crisis.”

A spokesman for the Middlesbrough Trussell Trust Foodbank said:

“When people do not have any money it does not matter if they have 25p or 4p. They have no money.

“People at the point of crisis are not there because they do not know how to cook. If you have not got anything in the cupboard you cannot cook it.”

 Bill Dixon, leader of Darlington Borough Council, said:
“People rely on food banks not because they do not have cooking skills, but because they do not have any money. It is not rocket science”

Later, Baroness Jenkin apologised, saying:

“I made a mistake. Obviously I was stupidly speaking unscripted.

“What I meant was, as a society, we have lost our ability to cook, or that no longer seems to be handed down in the way that it was in previously in previous generations.”

The row almost overshadowed a plea by Justin Welby, the Archbishop of Canterbury, for £100,000 of Government cash to kick-start a new organisation to eliminate hunger in the UK by 2020.

The DWP had been asked to attend and respond on the report’s recommendations, but – unlike the major supermarkets and utility regulators – failed to do so.

A junior minister from another department went instead, while No.10 ruled out changes to the sudden removal of benefits from “sanctioned” claimants – sending them to food banks, critics say.

In the Commons, Mr Duncan Smith said:

“I do take this report seriously. We have met the Trussell Trust—I have never refused to meet it.”

But Alison Inglis-Jones, a trustee of the Trussell Trust, said the organisation felt “vindicated”, adding: “Iain Duncan Smith has refused to talk to us for 18 months.

“We simply get irate letters back accusing us of scaremongering, saying this situation isn’t happening.”

Source –  Northern Echo,  08 Dec 2014

Rap song released in tribute to Archbishop of Canterbury’s payday loan stance

A Rap song has been released in tribute to the Archbishop of Canterbury‘s warnings about payday loans.

We Need A Union On The Streets, by music producer Charles Bailey and featuring the rapper Question Musiq, was inspired by the former Bishop of Durham, the Most Rev Justin Welby‘s efforts to expand Britain’s network of credit unions.

The song tells the story of young people who get into debt because of payday loans and features the words of personal finance guru Martin Lewis in which he warns that “payday loans gone wrong are a horrendous thing”.

The song has the chorus

What we need is a union, we need a union on the streets/Everybody hand in hand, people can’t you understand”

and the verse

“Yeah it’s unfair/But they don’t care/The rich get richer/While poor get less”.

The release comes after a national network aimed at offering an alternative to payday lenders was launched last month by Sir Hector Sants, who is heading a task group for the Archbishop on promoting credit unions.

The scheme is being piloted in the Southwark, Liverpool and London Church of England dioceses.

Mr Bailey, who has worked on social campaigns to combat gun violence and has also set the speeches of the late Tony Benn to music, said he had felt “moved” to help the task group.

When I listened to the Archbishop of Canterbury speaking out about pay day lenders I felt moved to do something to help his task group to reach to the urban youth who are often the victims and introduce them to a much safer and ethical way of borrowing through credit unions,” he said.

Mr Lewis said: “The payday loan industry is relatively new, and has used powerful marketing to build its business and groom young people to think it is normal.

 “It isn’t normal, it’s an extremely expensive way to borrow that most should avoid.”

Dr Elizabeth Henry, the Church of England’s adviser for minority ethnic Anglican concerns, said: “Efforts like this help the Church to extend its reach and engage with people on issues that affect their everyday lives.

“The song is appealing and I hope will get the message across to all communities that credit unions are a much safer way to borrow.”

The pay day lenders have argued that their loans are intended to be repaid over a short term and fill a gap left by the High Street banks. But Archbishop Welby has expressed concern that these loans are tempting people into a spiral of debt.

The Consumer Finance Association declined to comment on the recording.

Source –  Durham Times,  11 July 2014

Conservative warns that benefit changes are making more use North foodbanks

> Yes, you did read that headline correctly…

A broken benefits system is causing people to turn to food banks, an aspiring Conservative politician has said.

In comments more normally seen from Labour politicans, Berwick Tory Anne-Marie Trevelyan has said the number of people needing handouts to eat may be as a result of changes to the benefits system.

Mrs Trevelyan is bidding to take the seat from Sir Alan Beith when the Liberal Democrat steps down in 2015.

Much of her campaign has focused on the jobs potential of dualling the A1 north of Newcastle.

But last night she said that after visiting a Northumberland food bank, the evidence put to her was that those dependant upon benefits were suffering the result of changes to the system.

The Conservative-led coalition Government has come in for criticism from a variety of sources over its cuts to benefits.

Reductions in benefits have been criticised as indiscriminate while changes to the way benefits are handed out has seen delays as a result.

Mrs Trevelyan said: “All users of food banks in Northumberland have been referred by social services, Citizens Advice Bureaux or other groups like Sure Start. The reasons given are often delays in benefits being paid or other financial pressures leaving families with no money to buy food.

“I am concerned by the recurring message from the volunteers who run our local food banks, that the majority of those who come to them do so because the benefits payment system is not working.

“It should be there to support those who need a safety net while they find work or arrange long term support.

“There seems to be a serious breakdown in the effective management of the payments system. I am going to be talking in more detail with our job centre teams to try to find out what they need to solve this issue effectively.”

> Oh bugger – don’t ask them ! They’re  a major part of the problem.

The Conservative candidate said that a rapid rise in the number of food banks began under Labour in 2006 when there were 3,000 nationally. This rose to more than 40,000 by 2010.

In addition to this leading food bank provider the Trussell Trust has been expanding, inevitably leading to more hard-pressed families making use of their services.

Mrs Trevelyan’s comments are similar to many of those expressed by Northern Labour MPs, though of a far less critical nature.

Also adding their concerns to the growing number of food banks was former Bishop of Durham Justin Welby. Now Archbishop of Canterbury, he has called for a greater level of awareness from the Government on the causes behind the growing number of food banks in the UK.

Senior Tories have tried to play down the rise of food banks.

Education Secretary Michael Gove came under fire for saying that financial mismanagement was the reason many people were going to food banks.

And Work and Pensions Secretary Iain Duncan Smith, the man ultimately responsible for changes to the benefit system, refused to meet the Trussell Trust and accused it of being politically motivated.

Source – Newcastle Journal  15 Feb 2014