Tagged: John Major

UKIP and their idea of culture

 

 

> I could envisage a scenario where, should UKIP actually start to look like a real power in the land, dirty deals would be done in the background, Farrage would be deposed and a far more extreme right wing and even nastier party would emerge.

Guy Debord's Cat

I’ve just returned home to find this UKIP election leaflet on my door mat.

Policies for Brain-dead People Policies for Brain-dead People. But a UKIP government? Isn’t that wishful thinking?

My eyes were drawn to the section marked “culture” and nowhere does it mention the word ‘art’. Instead, we are treated to a list of things, which have little or no relevance to culture.

At the top of the list is this predictable pronouncement:

UKIP recognises and values an overarching, unifying British culture, which is open and inclusive to anyone who wishes to identify with Britain and British values, regardless of their ethnic or religious background.

Two questions – and these are questions that I’ve posed to white nationalists when they bleat about “British culture”: what is British culture and what are British values? Readers, I have to tell you that I have yet to receive an answer. All I get for my trouble…

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Culture For The Future?

Guy Debord's Cat

People are fond of gazing back at the past through rose-tinted spectacles.  I remember reading somewhere that no one ‘does’ nostalgia like the British.  I love the 70sI Love The 80s and Dominic Sandbrook’s lightweight, but subtly ideological history series The 70s always present the past as the ideal time in which to live. In Sandbrook’s case, the blemishes, lumps and bumps that define eras and epochs are simply burnished or given a right-wing twist.  “Thatcher arrived to save the country from the unions” was the unspoken message at the end of Sandbrook’s series, which ignored the fact that management ineptitude and a chronic lack of investment was mostly culpable for Britain’s economic and industrial decline. In the case of the I Love… series, talking heads from showbusiness were interviewed on camera to talk about how wonderful Kickers and Kappa tracksuits were. “I really loved Kickers and…

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PCS – Campaigning against attacks on welfare ?

Attempts by the government to make the poorest and most vulnerable pay for a crisis not of their making were condemned at PCS DWP group conference.

The group’s first motion this morning (19 May), proposed by Mandy Priest of DWP Dorset branch and seconded by Glasgow benefit centre branch, opposed the “implementation of a system based on punishment”.

> The “implementation” ? Bit late opposing the implemention – its been with us for several years !  As PCS’ DWP members must be aware.

The motion also said the “widest possible campaign across the trade union movement” was needed to defeat the government’s attacks on benefit claimants.

> The government’s attacks, certainly. But it’s DWP staff who implement them.

Gerry McMahon from Glasgow benefit centre branch said: “The welfare state has been under attack in Britain for many years. Huge cuts have been made that make life on benefits much harder.”

Gerry highlighted the fact that a group of religious leaders have said that hunger is now a national crisis and said our union needs to take up its welfare campaign “like never before“.

Nick Parker, from our Lincolnshire and Rutland branch, called for a united campaign involving “as many people as possible to defeat attacks on welfare”.

Tony Church, speaking on behalf of the group executive, said: “In the 90s John Major, the Tory prime minister, said we were living in a classless society. It was a lie then it’s a lie now. The current coalition goverment is probably the most  divided ever.”

He said that welfare reform was just another name for screw the poor.

 

The motion instructed conference to campaign for:

  • Fair, decent levels of benefit
  • The repeal of the Bedroom Tax and benefit cap
  • A mass council house building scheme
  • The abolition of the work capability assessment
  • The abolition of workfare and removal of the sanctions regime
  • A publicly-run, fair and decent social security system as part of a welfare state based on people’s needs.

The motion was passed unanimously.

> Fine words. But will PCS DWP members refuse to sanction people ? Not send people to workfare ?  They could make a start, right now. They probably wont, though.

Source – PCS Union website,  19 May 2014

http://www.pcs.org.uk/en/news_and_events/pcs_comment/index.cfm/campaigning-against-attacks-on-welfare

UKIP: elitism, libertarianism, anti-intellectualism and contradictions

Guy Debord's Cat

Ever since last Friday’s county council election results tumbled in, the Kippers have been crowing. Emboldened, too, by the BBC’s rather one-sided coverage their party, UKIP supporters have taken to social media in their droves to spout their anti-intellectual bullshit and hurl abuse at anyone who doesn’t share their belief that Nigel Farage is Britain’s political messiah. The BBC ought to know better: UKIP doesn’t have a single Westminster MP, while The Green Party not only has an MP, it also has a large number of local councillors and members on the Greater London Assembly (The Green have 2 AMs and UKIP has none). It also has representation in the Scottish Parliament (The Greens have 2 MSPs and UKIP has none), whereas UKIP have found it difficult to win a seat in both parliaments. But the Greens got no mention, while  Farage and his mates Paul Nuttall and Godfrey Bloom have…

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