Tagged: John Dobson Street

UKIP claims cycle lanes discriminate against the elderly because cyclists ‘are usually young’

Ukip has declared war on cycle lanes in Newcastle – by claiming they discriminate against the elderly.

The anti-EU party has distributed leaflets claiming it’s unfair to spend money on cyclists because they tend to be young.

And while Ukip acknowledges that Newcastle has received a £10m government grant for the lanes, it complains:

“Just because they receive a government grant they don’t have to spend it.”

> Uh, I think they probably do, you know. That’s rather the point of grants.

The leaflet highlights planned cycle lanes in Gosforth High Street, John Dobson Street and other roads in the city.

But it asks: “Are cycle lanes paved with gold?”

The Ukip leaflet continues:

“Cyclists are the chosen people, motorists are just a cash cow and have very few rights.

“How many elderly ladies will get on their bikes on a dark December night in Newcastle? Not many.

“Surely giving all the rights to cyclists, who are usually young people, is discrimination against the elderly and infirm?”

The leaflet goes on to complain that cyclists “carry no number plates or insurance” and suggests the council could improve road safety by ordering cyclists to put bells on their bikes.

But the claims were rejected by Newcastle Central Labour candidate Chi Onwurah.

She said:

“Cycling is a low impact way of keeping fit for people of all ages as well as a green and sustainable means of transport.

“The idea that this discriminates against older people is absurd and implies some kind of battle between cyclists and the elderly when in reality we all benefit from quieter, safer roads.

“Ukip have gone from picking on immigrants to picking on cyclists. Who is next I wonder?”

The leaflet from Ukip 

Earlier this week, Ukip launched its North East campaign and claimed it would be a “two horse race” between Ukip and Labour in the region.

Ukip and the Green Party are fielding a record number of General Election candidates as they seek to prove their credentials as emerging national political forces.

Provisional Press Association figures suggest Nigel Farage’s party is contesting 624 of the UK’s 650 Westminster seats – 66 more than it did in 2010.

Meanwhile the Greens, who have enjoyed a number of strong by-election performances, are putting up hopefuls in 571 seats – more than 70% higher than the 335 it fielded last time.

But in a signal of the dramatic decline of the far-right British National Party as an electoral force, it will be on the ballot paper in only eight constituencies, down from 338 last time.

The total number of candidates appears to have dipped slightly from 4,150 to 3,963 candidates.

A growing number are women – up almost a fifth from 854 to 1,020.

Ukip’s slate however is the only one of the major parties to be more male than in 2010, with only 77 women standing compared with 83.

Source – Newcastle Evening Chronicle, 11 Apr 2015

T. Dan Smith – : The high rise and fall of a leader who got greedy

> Another episode from not-to-distant history…

He called Newcastlethe Athens of the North East,” and in the end his life formed its own Greek tragedy.

Thomas Dan Smith could have given his name to a brave new era in local government but instead he lived out his days as a byword for council corruption.

Anyone picking up a copy of the Evening Chronicle on April 26, 1974, will have been able to see for themselves that the downfall of T Dan Smith was complete.

The former leader of Newcastle Council was handed a six-year sentence, of which he served three years, for his role in the Poulson affair. The corruption scandal had seen the architect pay out for lucrative council building contracts, with everyone but the taxpayer taking their cut.

In page after page of court copy, the city found out how the man who changed the face of Newcastle had been pocketing cash and passing on bribes.

Smith had led the council in the mid-60s at a time when Newcastle was going through much-needed dramatic changes. Slums were demolished, and plans for a city in the sky grew up alongside tower block housing projects and a concrete jungle along John Dobson Street. He cleared the way for the new Eldon Square and helped ensure Newcastle had at least one university in its centre.

At the same time Smith was an increasingly important part of the Poulson empire, working to advise the firm while at the same time ordering major contracts, before stepping down from the council in 1964 to act as consultant and PR man. Armed with a list of contacts, Smith worked his way around town hall offices across the country, doing what he did best and making sure major civic contracts went Poulson’s way.

As Smith’s trial and readers of the Chronicle heard, Smith “set out to make a fortune by attempted corruption of local government officials.

He recruited what readers were told was a “fifth column of corrupt councillors to work for John Poulson.”

Those payments included cash payouts to Andy Cunningham, the former Durham County Council chairman who was jailed alongside Smith for his part in accepting corrupt payments.

There were further payments to councillors elsewhere across England, but Smith seemed to think he was just part of the system.

The former leader told Leeds Crown Court, where he pleaded guilty, that: “I was corrupt because I condoned things on many occasions. I think I would accept that I was the corrupter, although I was as much corrupted as I corrupted others.”

Poulson received some £800,000 for the firm’s works in the North East, including fees for designing a new police station in Sunderland for Durham Police Authority.

But Smith lined his own pocket as well, with his PR firm typically taking around 1% of the major fees paid to Poulson from the likes of Smith’s own Newcastle.

At the time of his trial it was alleged Smith had taken some £156,000 from Poulson, though his bank accounts showed him to be broke by the time he came to court. Where the money went was never explained, though some point to European trips and the potential for secretive offshore accounts as a starting point.

The corruption would never have come to light if Poulson had not gone bankrupt, meaning his meticulously maintained accounts were open to investigators who had had their suspicions for years.

Smith spent three years behind bars, and eventually ended up living in a Cruddas Park high rise, the type of which would never have come to Newcastle if not for him.

The Smith legacy is everywhere to see in Newcastle, a former council leader says, and the city would be wrong to forget the positives Smith brought to tyneside.

Labour peer Lord Beecham said Smith was “enormously influential,” even if there were allegations around the man from long before his eventual trial.

When he was brought down, you knew it was a huge story, because of who he was. Some people still had admiration for him, based on what he had done, but for a while it tarnished the entire city.

“He was seen as a dynamic visionary leader at one point. But he was a classic Greek tragedy, he put pride before a fall.”

> He was a crook.  He got caught out and paid the price.

Source – Newcastle Evening Chronicle,  09 June 2014

Fascists march through Newcastle city centre

Up to 400 English Defence League supporters joined forces today (Saturday 17 May 2014)  to march through Newcastle.

The event started at 1pm in the Bigg Market, snaked along Collingwood Street, on to Westgate Road, along St James’ Boulevard, on to Barrack Road and into Leazes Park.

The procession was led to the beating of a drum and chants by its members.

Supporters draped in Union Jacks and St George’s flags were hemmed in by lines of police.

The far-right group arrived at Leazes Park to the sounds of a DJ in the sweltering heat.

And from the bandstand they listened to a string of speakers.

Police wearing high visibility jackets flanked the crowds and in the park they carried riot helmets in case of any trouble.

Joining in with the march were people of all ages, from pensioners to mums with their toddler children.

Wendy Angel, from Newcastle, who has been an EDL member since 2011, was an event speaker. She said: “There are more than 300 people here today. It’s great to get this support.”

Ian Crossland, from Sheffield, who is EDL’s South Yorkshire regional organiser, said: “We have had fantastic support. This is just a regional demo and over 300 have turned up. Last week we had a national demo in Rotherham and 700 attended there. We want to get our message across to the general public.”

> And your message is what exactly ?

Hundreds of police lined the streets were the march took place. Across the city officers could also be seen.

Anti-fascist group Newcastle Unites made a counter protest as they marched through the centre. The two groups were kept apart as Newcastle Unites started their march at the City Hall before going along John Dobson Street, on to New Bridge Street, along Blackett Street and ended up at the Monument where they held speeches.

Once the EDL were in Leazes Park, Newcastle Unites members marched along Gallowgate to Barrack Road where they held a static protest.

The EDL then marched back to the Bigg Market where the event finished.

Leader of Newcastle City Council, Coun Nick Forbes, said: “The extremist views of groups like the English Defence League have no place in a modern, welcoming city like Newcastle where everyone regardless of colour, creed or ethnicity is treated with respect.

“Their presence here is a huge concern to businesses and communities alike.”

Chief Supt Laura Young, Newcastle Area Commander, said: “As expected it’s been a busy day in Newcastle and I’d like to thank members of the public visiting the city centre and those who work and live here for their patience and cooperation today.

“There have been a number of events across the city, all of which have passed safely and with minimum disruption. All marches passed off smoothly and there have been no arrests or reported incidents of disorder during any of the events.

“Newcastle is a vibrant city and we get thousands of people coming in every weekend to enjoy everything the city has to offer and I’m pleased they felt able to do so today.

“We are expecting a normal busy Saturday night and officers will be on patrol as usual across the city. The city has a lively night life and this is something we are well used to policing. “

Source – Newcastle Evening Chronicle, 17 May 2014