Tagged: hustings

Brave revelation from parliamentary candidate brings domestic abuse into open

An election candidate made a brave revelation that she is a victim of rape during a hustings on female issues organised by the Darlington and Durham Rape and Sexual Abuse Counselling Centre.

Liberal Democrat candidate Anne-Marie Curry told the large gathering at Darlington Dolphin Centre’s Central Hall that it took her 22-years to accept she had been in an abusive relationship during her early 20s.

She described how she had witnessed some awful treatment of women during her upbringing in Uganda and that she had been threatened with knives when she later lived in Holland.

She said: “I seem to have opened myself up to rather destructive relationships from then on.

“At the age of 21 I was in a relationship and he was emotionally bullying me, hitting me and raping me.

“I didn’t realise that at the time, I only realised that in my 40s.”

Ms Curry’s revelation earned a round of applause and she said she wanted to speak out to bring the issue of domestic violence into the open.

She said:

“I can understand that women in that situation can find it really, really difficult to cope with what has happened to them.

“I am now coping, I am strong and I really want to shout about it because it (domestic abuse) is wrong.

 “These relationships need to stop and the only way we can do it is to be more open about it, talk about it, and allow young people through the education system to know that they shouldn’t let anybody harm them.”

Labour candidate Jenny Chapman said she was “blown away” and felt humbled by what Ms Curry had shared.

The hustings, chaired by Durham University professor Nicole Westmarland, touched on a range of female issues including funding problems experienced by rape crisis and support centres and whether more should be done to educate youngsters about domestic abuse.

The problems experienced by many victims of domestic abuse throughout the legal process were also highlighted, with all candidates agreeing that more needed to be done to support them.

All candidates also agreed that abuse and crimes against women were a key issue and Ms Chapman said that Labour planned to scrap Police and Crime Commissioners and would appoint a Women’s Commissioner in parliament.

 She said this would ensure there was person “with some clout” to ensure that women’s issues did not get sidelined.

The hustings was attended by Darlington’s candidates for the Trade Unionist and Socialist Coalition, Green, Conservative, Labour and Liberal Democrat parties who all signed a pledge to support women’s services.

UKIP candidate Dave Hodgson could not attend due to work commitments.

> Could he, given his party’s record, have signed it with a clear conscience anyway ?

Source – Northern Echo, 02 May 2015

UKIP candidate offers to organise gay pride march in Darlington after being accused of swerving hustings on environmental and LGBT issues

UKIP candidate offers to organise gay pride march in Darlington after being accused of swerving hustings on environmental and LGBT issues

A furious row broke out last weekend when UKIP Darlington falsely claimed their candidate David Hodgson had not received invites to two recent hustings events.

A post on the group’s Facebook page says:

“It may be of considerable interest to our supporters that David Hodgson did not receive any official invitation or notification to attend the two previous hustings despite the fact that his personal contact details are widely publicised.”

 Mr Hodgson later admitted receiving an invite to the environmental hustings but maintained he was not invited to the LGBT event – despite organisers insisting he was.

He claimed he did not write the contentious Facebook post and said he would ask for it to be amended to reflect the true circumstances.

Peter Plant, secretary of Darlington’s Friends of the Earth group and organiser of their recent hustings, accused UKIP of openly lying and suggested Mr Hodgson was “swerving” issues he had no political stance on.

Mr Hodgson said a previous engagement prevented him from attending the environmental hustings and claimed he would have welcomed an invite to the LGBT event.

 UKIP has previously been criticised in relation to LGBT issues, most notably in 2014 when then councillor David Silvester claimed heavy flooding in Britain was a result of legalised gay marriage.

However, Mr Hodgson pledged support for the LGBT community and said he would be interested in organising a gay pride event in Darlington.

He said: “Gay and lesbian people have my support and sympathy as I have gay friends myself and go through to Blackpool for gay pride events there.”

Mr Plant said: “I think he was frightened to turn up as UKIP don’t have the policies – they have one, blame foreigners.

“I’d respect them if they turned up and put their case, even if I don’t agree but by doing this, they’re showing they have no respect whatsoever.”

 Emma Roebuck, organiser of the LGBT hustings, added: “I sent invites to all candidates and have no reason to think UKIP did not receive theirs.

“The hustings was an opportunity to speak face-to-face with them about these issues and I’m not going to turn that down.”

Mr Hodgson’s agent, David Williams, added:

“Following negative comments an assertions regarding Mr Hodgson regarding his non-attendance at two recent hustings meetings, it must be made clear that no official invitation was received using the accepted official protocols.”

 > Which presumably means they were given invitations, but in the wrong way ? Sounds like a great get-out clause.
Source – Northern Echo, 15 Apr 2015

North East Christians call for end to ‘political short-termism’ ahead of General Election

North East Christians are calling for an end to “political short-termism” and urge the next Government to take issues like homelessness and food poverty seriously.

A new poll by Church Action on Poverty also reveals practising Christians are frustrated by church leaders’ failure to challenge politicians.

The poll, carried out by ComRes, highlights a deep dissatisfaction with Government among the region’s congregations.

It found:

  • Eight in ten (82%) Christians would vote for a party with a positive long-term vision for society;
  • Nine in ten (90%) think politicians are more interested in short-term political concerns;
  • 74% believe churches and church leaders don’t talk enough in public about issues like food poverty, homelessness and tax avoidance;
  • Four in five (85%) say that churches and church leaders do not effectively challenge politicians to communicate a long-term positive vision for society.

Minister Simon Lawton, of Newcastle’s Elim Pentecostal Church, said:

“I’m not at all surprised by the results of this survey. I would imagine that most people would agree with its findings.

“I believe people long for a society where compassion, justice and love and respect for your fellow man is central.

“Naturally we all have a part to play in this. The coming election is an opportunity for all of us, especially Christians, to host hustings and interview prospective candidates in order to make an informed decision.

“We can make a difference and we have a responsibility to make our vote count locally.”

The charity Churches Together is now calling on church-goers to challenge the region’s would-be MPs during hustings it will organise in the run-up to the General Election to coincide with its Vision 2020 of the Good Society report.

It comes ahead of Church Action on Poverty Sunday, this weekend as the charity calls for politicians to put forward a vision for a better society and to reject negative campaigning.

Niall Cooper, director of Church Action on Poverty, said:

“As the Bible says ‘Without a vision, the people perish.’

“Christians are crying out for politicians to share a positive long-term vision for society – but politicians and political parties are currently failing to do so.

“But today’s poll is also a challenge to the churches to speak publicly about our own vision of a good society.

“By organising local hustings events, we can challenge those who want to represent us in Parliament to go beyond the usual political short-termism and engage in a positive debate about the kind of society they – and we – want to live in by the year 2020.”

Bob Fyffe, general secretary of Churches Together, added:

“The emphasis church-goers so often want is a shared vision of the Common Good. How do we build long-term sustainable communities where justice and compassion are at the centre of all that we do?

“It is having a vision for those who are on the margins and feel that there is no one there for them.

“How do we build local communities where people of faith and those of no faith can share common values and live in harmony, where everyone has a proper sense of belonging?

“Taking part in the democratic process is of fundamental importance to being a good citizen. The church hustings allow people to come together and make informed decisions which are central to their lives and prosperity.”

Source –  Newcastle Evening Chronicle,  13 Feb 2015