Tagged: housing

What the Conservative win means for your money

The lovely wibbly wobbly old lady

Article reposted from AOL Money UK

Good Morning my darlings. I’m feeling a little less emotional about the election result (still angry though) and so I decided to look into what’s to come …

​What the Conservative win means for your money© PA Wire

Few people predicted any one party could win outright but now the Conservatives have done just that.

Before today, the party manifestos were seen as starting points for coalition negotiations, but now that the Tories have won a small majority they will be able to implement their pledges.

So what were those pledges and how will they affect you? Let’s take a look…

Your taxes

The Tory manifesto was stuffed full of promises on tax, including raising the personal allowance to £12,500 and increasing the 40% tax threshold to £50,000. The threshold is currently £42,386, which means current higher-rate taxpayers could save a tidy sum.

A key Conservative pledge was on inheritance tax…

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New tactics from the DWP workers. 

The poor side of life

Every week we hear new stories of how the DWP workers try to trick people into receiving a sanction. We aren’t easily shocked anymore but if you haven’t heard of these tactics in your area please watch out for them. Here’s a few read and note. These aren’t unusual but it’s good to highlight them every now and then.

Only apply for jobs that you know you will be successful in getting on the universal job match website. Now we know that most of these jobs are fake jobs but yes this was a nugget of advice given yesterday. If you apply for jobs that you won’t get then we will sanction you. It’s a no win situation for the client and he got illegally sanctioned. Don’t fall for this one folks unless you possess some kind of clairvoyant ability then how would you know if you are going to…

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Springing into action: early April round-up

Cautiously pessimistic

Another quick round-up:

The warehouse workers who’ve been organising in West London want to hit the road and talk to other workers in big warehouse hubs across the country, as well as organising film screenings of a new documentary about struggles by warehouse workers in Italy. If you’d like to get in touch about an event in your town, you can contact them at angryworkersworld@gmail.com.

The Freedom Riders, the group of pensioners and disabled people who’ve been taking direct action against transport cuts in South Yorkshire with mass fare-dodging actions, have been going strong for a year now, and celebrated their first anniversary with a demonstration in Barnsley on Tuesday 31st. They’ve produced a two-sided leaflet to explain the story so far in their fight for free travel on both trains and buses.

The Barnsley freedom riders celebrate their anniversary

Shilan Ozcelik, the Kurdish girl being held in remand for allegedly wanting to resist…

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Supreme Court blow for government’s social engineering policies

Order Of Truth

scshA ruling by five judges of the Supreme Court could affect local authorities who attempt to place tenants out of their areas as a result of the government’s £500 per week benefit cap.

Five judges ruled in favour of Titina Nzolameso, a single mother, following a hearing that went against Westminster Council, which sought to move her family from London to accommodation 50 miles away, near Milton Keynes

The Supreme Court this week quashed the local authority’s decision that it had “properly discharged its duty to secure accommodation available for occupation by the appellant”.

Ms Nzolameso is a British citizen who has lived in London for 17 years and her children are settled at schools in Westminster.

She applied for cheaper housing in November 2012 and was offered the alternative accommodation out of the borough in Milton Keynes. After she turned it down, the council said it no longer had…

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Major civil rights exhibition launches a national tour in Newcastle

 

Dr Martin Luther King pictured with a group of students at Newcastle University in 1967
Dr Martin Luther King pictured with a group of students at Newcastle University in 1967

The visit by Martin Luther King to Newcastle in 1967 will link America’s fight for civil rights and battles waged on our own doorstep in a major exhibition making its national debut in the North next month.

Former US civil rights worker Marcia Heinemann Saunders will be over to cut the ribbon at the launch of Journey to Justice  on April 4 – the anniversary of King’s assassination – at Discovery Museum where it will run for a month ahead of a national tour.

And it’s set to get everyone talking with its fascinating mix of archive film, photographs, music, poetry, oral histories and high-profile speakers including former ANC freedom fighter Archie Sibeko, now settled in the region.

It’s the culmination of nearly three years’ hard work and fund-raising by former teacher Carrie Supple whose initial idea, inspired by a trip to the US, spiralled to include a huge range of local organisations and supporters as well as volunteers.

The London-based 56-year-old, whose mother was from Newcastle and who herself taught history in the region for 10 years, is delighted how it’s taken off.

“I’m very excited about it,” she said.

“I went to America in 2012 and visited the civil rights museums. I thought it would be great telling the story in the UK when I came back.”

Newcastle was a natural choice for it, with her own links, the visit from King when the civil rights leader received an honorary degree from Newcastle University, our own historic struggles and the scale of support she found here which includes some university funding.

Running until May 4, the focus of the exhibition will be on stories rarely heard.

Those of the American civil rights movement in the sixties include Marcia’s support in helping African Americans in Tennessee to register their vote; six-year-old Ruby Bridges who had to be escorted to school under armed guard because of the fury caused by allowing her entry to an all-white school, and the Greensboro sit-in where students were refused service at a “whites only” counter in a Woolworth store in North Carolina. The exhibition will recreate the counter where visitors can sit and learn about the story.

And the backdrop to it all will be the stirring church music of the civil rights era.

“Many said the music gave them the strength and the hope to get them through,” said Carrie.

Tyneside’s social justice story will feature The Jarrow March and fights for better health care, housing, mining conditions, pay and trade union rights, and local young people have played a part by recording memories of the older generation.

“There are people who recall being in the room with Martin Luther King in 1967,” said Carrie.

Source – Sunday Sun, 15 Mar 2015

Half a million more people claiming housing benefit under coalition

Order Of Truth

hbenAs we have reported many times, the claims of the government that their so-called ‘austerity measures’ are saving money for the taxpayer are nothing more than lies. Simple.

In particular, their claim of saving money through housing benefit reforms are ridiculous and defy simple logic. Looking at the ramifications of their ill-thought-out policy shows that the housing benefit bill has risen considerably as a direct result of their incompetence and social engineering policies.

The following report is from The Guardian.

Britain’s failure to build affordable homes has led to a soaring housing-benefit bill – with half a million more people now relying on state hand-outs to pay their rent than when the coalition came to power, a damning new analysis reveals.

The coalition’s crackdown on welfare has failed to prevent an explosion in the number of people relying on state help in recent years, with a total of five…

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News from the jobcentres, assessment centres, and prisons: late February round-up

Cautiously pessimistic

Another quick round-up of news across a few different areas:

In repression news, five water charge protesters are still in jail in Ireland for protesting against water meter installations. I’ve not been able to find any addresses to write to the five in jail, but I’ll keep looking. In the mean time, the movement’s not taken this attack lying down, with a fresh wave of angry protests in response, as well as ongoing resistance preventing water meters from being installed. It’s difficult keeping up with the myriad of facebook pages reporting on what seems to be a genuinely decentralised movement, but Release the Water Warriors NOW seems to be the main campaign for the release of the five, and the Workers’ Solidarity Movement continue to provide ongoing reporting from an anarchist perspective. Meanwhile, closer to home, the ongoing police crackdown on anarchists in Bristol has resulted in its…

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More news about water, work, welfare and wage theft: Mid-February round-up

Cautiously pessimistic

It’s been a few weeks since I did a proper news round-up. While there’s not been that much in the way of big, attention-grabbing stories, there’s still a multitude of local struggles going on up and down the country, so I’d like to try and highlight a few of those.

But first, a brief bit of international news. The South African farmworkers’ union, CSAAWU, was recently hit with an incredibly punitive court order forcing them to pay R600,000 (that’s $54,800 or £3,3400), which could well bankrupt them, so it’s good to report that, thanks to international solidarity, they’ve hit their first target of raising $10,000. There’s a long way still to go, but it’s clear that they’re not beaten yet. Meanwhile in Spain, the seven anarchists being held without trial as part of Operation Pandora have been released on bail, although there are still charges against them, and…

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12 months that mostly didn’t really shake the world that much: 2014 in review

Cautiously pessimistic

Image via the Dialectical Delinquents site

So, another year has come and gone. To be honest, it’s not really been a great one, overall: on an international level, the wave of revolt that rolled around the world in 2010-12 feels like it’s still rolling back, with most of the struggles that broke out having been contained one way or another. In particular, something that’s been vividly illustrated over the last few years is the dangers of a popular revolt being turned into a military struggle: from Syria to Ukraine, we’ve seen how tragic the results can be when widespread anger against an unpopular regime can be captured and channelled into nationalist directions, especially when wider imperialist forces are involved.

In the UK, I don’t think there’s been many big, definitive moments that sum up the year as a whole: just like in 2013, life for most people has mostly continued gradually getting worse, and my real…

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Benefit sanctions responsible for more homeless young people

Order Of Truth

homelessyouungA report published by Homeless Link, the umbrella body for homelessness organisations, has uncovered clear relationships between the government’s ‘welfare reforms’ and the rise in homelessness of under 25s.

The charity’s research, which includes information from more than 200 homelessness charities and council agencies across England, reveals that benefit sanctions have risen from 1.7 per cent of cases in 2013 to 10 per cent in 2014.

Since tougher requirements for those claiming Jobseekers Allowance and Employment and Support Allowance were introduced by the Department of Work and Pensions in 2012, increasing the time sanctions can be imposed, more than 90% of the agencies reported that the sanctions had severely affected young people’s ability to access new accommodation.

Rick Henderson, the group’s chief executive, told The Independent “We know that early experience of homelessness can lead to the development of significant problems in later life, and for young people who…

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