Tagged: hospital

Blaydon MP Dave Anderson claims Tyneside nurses are turning to shoebox collections

NHS nurses on Tyneside are “seriously considering” setting up shoebox collections to help colleagues struggling to cope with pay cuts, MPs have heard.

Labour’s Dave Anderson, MP for Blaydon,  said some nurses were worried about getting through Christmas.

And he said he had been informed of the idea under consideration at a trust where the chief executive’s pay had increased alongside a rise in allowances for its governors.

Speaking in the Commons, Mr Anderson told Health Secretary Jeremy Hunt :

“Can I advise you that last week I spoke to nurses at the hospital near my constituency who told me because of the ongoing cuts to their pay, which has been going on for many years, they are actually seriously considering setting up shoebox collections to help their members get through Christmas.

“At the same time, the chief executive of the trust has had a 17% pay increase and the governors of the trust have had an 88% increase in their allowances.

“Is this what you mean by all being in this together?”

Mr Hunt replied that the Government would take no lessons from Labour on increases to the salaries of senior managers.

He said:

“I’m afraid we won’t take any lessons from the party that increased managers’ pay at double the rate of nurses’ pay when they were in office.

“I’ll tell you what this Government has done when it comes to the lowest paid NHS workers, because of our increases in the tax-free threshold they have seen their take home pay go up by £1,000 a year.”

> Pot calls kettle black, blah, blah, blah… meanwhile the nurses are still collecting.

Source –  Newcastle Evening Chronicle,  02 Dec 2014

‘Obscene’ – cash-strapped Hartlepool health trust spends £350k to relocate management offices

A cash-strapped health trust is spending what has been described as an “obscene” £350,000 to relocate offices of its management and other services.

Hartlepool MP Iain Wright says the cash for the “flashy” offices at the town’s hospital could have been better used keeping two hospital-based nurseries open for at least 18 months.

The repositioning of the rooms at the University Hospital of Hartlepool comes at a time when services are being stripped away and shifted to the University Hospital of North Tees, in Stockton.

But bosses at North Tees and Hartlepool NHS Foundation trust, which is £1.25m in deficit, say the move is part of centralising remaining services in the main tower block of the Holdforth Road site and will save £550,000 on running costs.

A disgruntled trust worker told the Mail that a number of offices, including a chief executive’s office with en-suite toilet, chairman’s office, a boardroom and administration offices, were being created at the town site on what was Ward 5, on the third floor.

It comes as a consultation is underway to close the day nurseries at the two hospitals, which have lost £764,000 in four years, with around 50 jobs at risk.

Union chiefs have slammed the move as “obscene”, especially in light of the proposed axing of the nurseries.

Hartlepool MP Iain Wright said:

“The idea that £350,000 is being spent, speaking as an accountant, I can’t see where the savings are going to be made.

“£350,000 could keep the nurseries at Hartlepool and North Tees open for another 18 months.

“You have got a spending priority at a time when the NHS is starved of funds, and it wouldn’t be flashy offices.”

The worker, who did not wish to be named, said the relocation work included the stripping out of oxygen tubes from the ward’s former use.

Work to fit carpets in the offices was carried out on a Bank Holiday, but the trust says this did not incur any extra costs.

The worker said:

“I can’t understand why Alan Foster is putting an office suite and other rooms in while they are talking about closing Hartlepool hospital.

“And he is trying to close the nurseries at the two hospitals, yet he has built these new offices.”

Unison area organiser Mark Edmundson said:

At a time when the trust is proposing to close two nurseries that provide essential childcare for trust staff and the local community and also make people redundant, the cost of these offices is simply obscene.

“Unison urges the trust to look again at the nursery closure; perhaps fewer new offices for the highest-paid executives at the trust would enable this lifeline for hard-working people to remain open.”

Alex Cunningham, MP for Stockton North, which includes North Tees, said:

“I am very surprised that the trust would spend such huge amounts of money on offices at a time when they are contemplating cuts to things like nursery provision.

“If they are able to make savings of half a million pounds as a result, that’s money that could be directly invested in the nursery provision, which could be expanded, if there is a will to do that.”

The trust’s associated director of estates and facilities Peter Mitchell said:

Work is continuing to ensure we make best use of the buildings and space at the University Hospital of Hartlepool.

“The plan is to bring in as many services as possible into the main hospital building to improve security and quality.

“Services which have been occupied in the Hart Building including office space, meeting rooms, wheelchair services, ICT, the sewing room, medical records and domestic services are being moved into a space formerly used as wards in the main hospital building.

“The costs associated with the space utilisation work is £350,000. It is estimated that by moving these services and closing the Hart Building, the trust will save around £550,000 – money to be put back into patient care.”

The trust says the toilet associated with Mr Foster’s office was already there.

Source –  Hartlepool Mail,  07 Oct 2014

North-East ‘ignored’ as Government announces £353m Birmingham hospital

Hartlepool MP Iain Wright has accused the Government of “ignoring” the North East after plans were approved for a new hospital in the Midlands.

 The Government has approved plans to build a new £353m acute care hospital near Birmingham using funding from the public and private sectors.

Chancellor of the Exchequer George Osborne announced approval for the Midland Metropolitan Hospital in Smethwick during a visit to meet NHS leaders in the Midlands.

But while that hospital is due to open in 2019, the long-running saga over a planned new hospital at Wynyard shows no signs of coming to an end.

Mr Wright said: “I think this reflects the notion that the North East is not a priority for this Government.

“In many respects they don’t consider us as a pressing part of what they do.

“We were the worst hit on cuts in the whole country, and they are taking far too long to make their mind up on Wynyard.

“All this ongoing uncertainty is not helpful to concerns over the provision of healthcare in our area.”

Hartlepool councillors granted fresh planning permission for the Wynyard project back in February after an initial application lodged back in 2009 lapsed following a series of setbacks.

That move put the ball back in the court of the North Tees and Hartlepool NHS Foundation Trust to find the funding to allow work to start.

If it ever gets the go-ahead, the development will include a 568-bed hospital with an extra 66 day beds, 26 wards and 14 operating theatres.

The trust is waiting for news of a £100m contribution from the Government towards the £272m scheme

The planned Wynyard hospital would replace the University Hospitals of Hartlepool and North Tees, in Stockton.

The scheme which has received the green light in the Midlands has striking similarities to the Wynyard plan, with the new facility replacing some existing services at other sites operated by the Sandwell and West Birmingham Hospitals NHS Trust, including the accident and emergency departments at City and Sandwell hospitals.

Referring to the project, Mr Osborne said: “This ambitious package will ensure that patients across the West Midlands continue to benefit from access to world-class acute treatment and cutting-edge facilities.

“It is because of the difficult decisions we have taken as a government that we have been able to protect healthcare spending, and announce new facilities like the Midland Metropolitan Hospital.”

North Tees and Hartlepool NHS Foundation Trust’s director of finance Lynne Hodgson said: “The trust’s independent regulator Monitor has completed its affordability assessment of the new hospital.

“Work is ongoing with Department of Health to finalise its analysis of the scheme.

“The Department of Health assessment considers affordability, value for money and the strategic fit for health care services in the Teesside area.

“It is hoped that this assessment will be concluded imminently after which the trust should receive a final decision.”

Source –  Hartlepool Mail,  17 July 2014

Buy-out deal frees Hexham Hospital from PFI burden

The crippling Private Finance Initiative scheme which funded the building of the new Hexham General Hospital has been bought out.

This is thanks to a £114m loan agreement struck between Northumberland County Council and the Northumbria Healthcare NHS Foundation Trust. The trust has pledged that the £3.5m annual savings generated by the deal would be ploughed back into frontline services.

The hospital was built 10 years ago with the help of one of the first PFIs in the country.

But the burden of PFI repayments has taken its toll on the trust’s balance sheet.

So, after two years of delicate negotiations, and with Treasury approval, the trust has signed a loan with the county council to buy out the PFI. The council has access to loans through the Public Works Board below rates available to the trust.

The loan is the first of its kind agreed between a local authority and a healthcare trust.

Trust chief executive Jim Mackey said: “We are delighted that we are able to progress this agreement which delivers real value for money for taxpayers and helps save millions of pounds which will be reinvested directly in patient care.”

County council deputy leader, Coun. Dave Ledger, said: “This announcement is excellent news for local people and the local economy.

“The loan represents good value for the residents of Northumberland as it will reduce overall borrowing costs and release resources to support frontline health and social care services across the county.

“This is a result of the very strong and close working arrangements that have existed between Northumberland County Council and Northumbria Healthcare for a number of years, resulting in some of the best examples of integrated health and social care in England.”

Source –  Hexham Courant,  11 June 2014

Church Leaders Slam “Punitive” Welfare Cuts As Half A Million Left To Go Hungry

27 church leaders, including a number of Anglican bishops, have slammed coalition benefit cuts and “punitive” sanctions in an unprecedented attack on the government’s welfare policies.

In a letter to the Daily Mirror, the church leaders warn that “one in five mothers report regularly skipping meals to better feed their children” and others are having to face the unenviable decision between eating and heating as “food prices have gone up 30% in just five years”.

The church leaders argue that half a million people are having to turn to food banks to feed themselves as their families, and that it was time for society to “face up to the fact that over half of people using food banks have been put in that situation by cut backs and failures in the benefit system”.

According to the signatories of the letter “5,500 people were admitted to hospital in the UK for malnutrition last year”.

They say that there is a “moral imperative” for society and the coalition government to act on food poverty and take immediate action to “make sure that work pays, and to ensure that the welfare system provides a robust last line of defence against hunger”.

The letter sent to the Daily Mirror reads as follows:

“Britain is the world’s seventh largest economy and yet people are going hungry.

“Half a million people have visited food banks in the UK since last Easter and 5,500 people were admitted to hospital in the UK for malnutrition last year.

“One in five mothers report regularly skipping meals to better feed their children, and even more families are just one unexpected bill away from waking up with empty cupboards.

“We often hear talk of hard choices. Surely few can be harder than that faced by the tens of thousands of older people who must “heat or eat” each winter, harder than those faced by families whose wages have stayed flat while food prices have gone up 30% in just five years.

“Yet beyond even this we must, as a society, face up to the fact that over half of people using food banks have been put in that situation by cut backs to and failures in the benefit system, whether it be payment delays or punitive sanctions.

“On March 5th Lent will begin. The Christian tradition has long been at this time to fast, and by doing so draw closer to our neighbour and closer to God.

“On March 5th we will begin a time of fasting while half a million regularly go hungry in Britain. We urge those of all faith and none, people of good conscience, to join with us.

“There is an acute moral imperative to act. Hundreds of thousands of people are doing so already, as they set up and support food banks across the UK. But this is a national crisis, and one we must rise to.

“We call on government to do its part: acting to investigate food markets that are failing, to make sure that work pays, and to ensure that the welfare system provides a robust last line of defence against hunger.”

Source – Welfare News Service, 19 Feb 2014

North East Paramedics hold crisis talks over Government cuts

Paramedics will today hold crisis talks as the North East Ambulance Service reveals the full extent of Government cuts.

Ambulance staff will meet at a seminar to ask just who cares for the carers, and what can be done to force NHS bosses to better fund them.

The service will warn that Government-ordered 20% budget cuts mean patients are sometimes waiting more than two hours for a vehicle, while rapid response staff are waiting five hours in a patient’s home with the patient waiting for transport.

In a damning list of support failings set to go to NHS chiefs, the service will warn that: staff morale is at an all-time low; assaults on staff have shot up; paramedics are spending hours in A&E waiting for a bed for patients.

Union leaders say the service is having to call in volunteers from St John’s Ambulance to help out even o n some emergency calls.

Just last week it was reported home patients in the North East are being forced to wait up to six hours for an ambulance despite guidelines saying paramedics should arrive within 30 minutes.

One patient had to wait more than three hours after the emergency was categorised as ‘red2’, which is potentially life-threatening and has a target time of eight minutes.

Figures obtained by The Journal from a Freedom of Information request showed that the North East Ambulance Service failed to meet their target response times on 10 separate occasions in a 12-month period.

Staff at the meeting in Durham today will discuss what to do about growing work pressures. They say that late finishes appear now to be nearly every shift, there are late meal breaks, if any at all, and will warn that crews are regularly facing angry families when arriving on a job knowing that the patient had been waiting for a while.

Paramedics will hear from North East Labour MEP candidate Jude Kirton-Darling, who will warn that a Conservative victory in elections this May could see EU working limits scrapped, making the situation worse.

Joel Byers, Unison’s North East Ambulance Service staff secretary, said: “Government cuts have forced ambulance trusts to cut 20% of their budget year on year but stating patient care should not be affected. This is an impossible task as the majority of our budget is for frontline services.

“The Commissioners are reluctant to pay extra money on a long-term basis to enable North East Ambulance Service to recruit more vitally needed staff. However, workloads have increased year on year with no extra resources except for the use of Private Ambulance Companies. The use of Private Ambulance Companies, First Responders and Police Cars is evidence in itself that there is a lack of resource in frontline staff.

“Every department from frontline, support services and HQ staff are undergoing restructures which are potentially putting staff at risk.

“The extra pressure being applied by the cuts is not just having emotional impact on staff but also a physical impact on staff in terms of assaults and injuries at work.

“For example the number of North East Ambulance Staff that have either suffered an injury at work or been assaulted has risen 590 in 2009 to 916 in 2013.

“With the ongoing pressure being placed on staff we expect the number to increase considerably in 2014.”

Last night he was backed by Ms Kirton-Darling, who said: “Ambulance workers in the North East have told me over the last few months they have experienced growing pressure as their working conditions deteriorate.

“Vital rest periods, set out in the European working time directive are there to ensure ambulance staff are able to operate safely and effectively on our behalf.

“Who in their right mind would want an ambulance worker dealing with a matter of life and death after a 12-hour shift without rest?

“The North East Ambulance Service must ensure decent rest periods and limit working time, otherwise I fear the service could face its own emergency soon with the public and workforce potentially put at risk.”

Source – Newcastle Journal  29 Jan 2014

Benefits stopped ‘to meet targets’, PCS union claims

People looking for work have had their benefits stopped to meet government targets, the PCS union claims.

 

The union, which represents many job centre staff, said they had been under “enormous pressure” to stop claimants’ Jobseeker’s Allowance.

 

Some claimants said they had benefits withdrawn for “genuine mistakes” such as missing appointments.

 

The government says sanctions are a “last resort”, and strongly denies the union’s claim.

 

“Job centre staff are under enormous pressure to implement sanctions on unemployed people,” PCS union north-east regional secretary Simon Elliot said.

> Some of them. Others seem to revel in that little bit of power, and dont require any pressure whatsoever…

 

“Staff are faced with the threat of sanctions themselves in the form of what they call performance improvement plans if they don’t impose sanctions.

 

“If you look at the guidance for implementing the performance improvement plans it clearly states that it’s a measure against targets.”

 

David Taws from North Tyneside had his benefit suspended for forgetting an appointment.

 

He phoned to apologise but was told the Department for Work and Pensions (DWP) would need to be informed.

 

“The letter turned up on the 20th of December and I was literally sanctioned over Christmas,” he said. “It was horrific – I had to go literally begging for food at a church hall.”

Another man, who did not wish to be named, said his benefit was cut for a month in September.

 

“I explained that I was caring for my nana,” he said. “I was up and down to the hospital with her. It totally slipped my mind. I phoned up and said I’m half an hour late for my appointment and they said, ‘OK, we’ll just put it as a miss’.

 

“I got a letter two weeks later saying I was sanctioned – for 28 days.”

 

Mr Elliot said staff were being forced to carry out “politically motivated” objectives.

> Forced ? You’re a bloody trade union, man ! You should be in there fighting.

 

The DWP strongly denied there were any targets for the number of sanctions that Job Centre staff must hand out. It also said there was a right of appeal.

 

North Tyneside Council Conservative group leader Judith Wallace defended the use of sanctions to “stamp out the something-for-nothing culture”.

 

She said: “If people are unemployed, and looking for work, clearly it is right that they should get benefits but, equally clearly, it’s right that there should be conditions attached to those benefits.”

> Yes ? And haven’t  there always been conditions attached ? It’s just that they’ve never been used as a political weapon in such a cynical way before. And for all sanctions have increased massively, lets not forget that unemployment continues to rise in the North East.

And where are our local Labour MPs in all this ? Or any other local political party outside the coalition ?

Sanctions system

 

  • The new regime came into force in October 2012
  • Sanctions of between four weeks and three years can be imposed
  • More than 400,000 in England, Scotland and Wales had Jobseeker’s Allowance stopped in the first nine months of the new system
  • In Northumberland and Tyne and Wear the figure was almost 17,500 for the same period
  • In Durham and Tees Valley it was nearly 16,000
  • It was more than 20,000 in Cumbria and Lancashire

 

Source – BBC News Tyne & Wear, 24 Jan 2014

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-england-tyne-25885078