Tagged: Great North Run

Great North Run organizers copyright the word ‘Great’

Great North Run organisers have admitted being “a little over the top” in a wrangle with a charity race in a small Welsh village.

The Narth Run, which usually only features a few dozen runners, was forced to drop the word “Great” from its title for Sunday’s event in Monmouthshire.

Organiser Steve Coppell said it had been a “tongue-in-cheek”  reference to the world-famous half marathon event in Tyneside.

“When you live in a village called The Narth there really is only one thing to call your race, so slightly mischievously, tongue-in-cheek, as a bit of fun, we put the word ‘Great’ in front of our run and ran it quite happily for a couple of years,” he told the BBC.

“After last year’s run we got a solicitor’s letter on behalf of Nova [since renamed The Great Run Company] who organise these splendid events the Great North Run and Great South Run etc, pointing out we’d inadvertently been infringing their trademark.

“They had actually trademarked the word ‘Great’ in connection with place names and sporting events.”

Full story :  http://northstar.boards.net/thread/114/great-north-organizers-copyright-word

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Disability campaigner to deliver birthday card to Iain Duncan Smith

Disability campaigner Mary Laver is to deliver a special birthday card to Iain Duncan Smith – to thank him for plans to “imprison” her in her own home.

She is protesting against his party’s plans to scrap the Independent Living Fund (ILF) on June 30.

Mary, 67, of Forest Hall, Newcastle, said: “I’m very frightened about what this will mean to me and anything I can do to at least raise the issue of this appalling cut, the better.”

The former RAF servicewoman has rheumatoid arthritis so severe that she cannot walk or use her hands.

As such she requires constant care – receiving around 18 hours a day or 126 a week at present. The majority is funded by her local authority but 46 hours a week comes as a result of the ILF.

Ironically it was set up by the Conservatives in 1988 for disabled people with high support needs to enable them to live in the community rather than move into residential care.

It costs about £320m a year and helps nearly 18,000 disabled people across the country.

However, according to the plan, in June the funding and responsibility of ILF care and support needs will transfer to local authorities – but there is no obligation to use the money specifically for ILF.

And after one year, the funding from the Government will cease, meaning local authorities need to find it from their own ever decreasing budgets.

Mary is travelling to London with her support team for her protest on Thursday, the Department for Work and Pension Minister’s 61st birthday.

She will set off in her powered wheelchair and travel from the House of Commons, via the Royal Courts of Justice, 14 miles to Duncan Smith’s Chingford constituency in London to deliver a card she has had specially designed for the occasion.

She said: “I do not want to trust anyone else with such an important gift.”

Speaking of the effect the closure of the ILF will have on her, Mary said: “He is going to imprison me in my own home for the rest of my life without a parole or right to appeal. My crime? The crime that I have committed is becoming a disabled person.

“Not only am I disabled, but I am severely disabled with a mandatory life sentence.”

In 2009, Mary travelled from Land’s End to John O’Groats in her electric wheelchair to raise money for The Royal British Legion and made it into the ­Guinness Book of ­World Records.

She has taken part in the Great North Run and in 2012 she carried the Olympic torch through Newcastle.

Mary said: “This will probably be my last long journey.”

She added: “There are 18,000, give or take a few, ILF users who are going to lose on the 30th June, the funding to live an independent life, a life that non-disabled people accept as normal.

“The ILF stands for, Independent Living Fund, that is what the it gives us, our independence to enable us to live our life as we see fit.

“My message to all political parties is that it is not too late to save the ILF. Be true to yourself and stop the cruellest cut of all, cutting the Independent Living Fund, the ILF.”

A conservative spokesman said: “Our understanding of disabled people has changed over the past 20 years, and along with it there have been significant developments in how we provide social care to disabled people so they can live independent lives.

“Spending on disability benefits has increased under this Government – we continue to spend £50 billion a year on disabled people and the services provided to them. As part of our long-term economic plan we want to make sure that disabled people are given the support that allows them to fulfil their potential.”

Source – Newcastle Evening Chronicle, 05 Apr 2015

Gateshead Council leader speaks of heartbreak at making cuts

The leader of Gateshead Council has spoken of the heartbreak of having to make drastic budget cuts to plug an expected £46m shortfall in its finances over the next two years.

Coun Mick Henry said:

“It’s heartbreaking not just for me but people who work here who have joined me on the council. We’re all from Gateshead, most were born here and we believe in Gateshead.”

The council has already reduced spending by £90.6m since 2010 costing 1,700 jobs but, it says, because of further Government cuts it will have to find further savings of £46m by 2017.

It will mean over the seven year period it will have had to make around £140m in savings. In that time, the council workforce will have been slashed almost in half, from 4,000 to just below 2,000.

Coun Henry admitted: “You can’t lose that percentage of staff without it having a major impact on services.”

He was speaking after a Cabinet meeting which gave the go ahead for a raft of proposals which are now going out to public consultation.

Recommendations could see the equivalent of 275 full time equivalent posts being lost with leisure and housing provision being the areas hit hardest by the jobs axe.

There would also be a significant reduction in road maintenance, a review of library and children’s services and the axing of a free support service for elderly people.

In the arts, there will be a 15% reduction in funding to the Sage music centre and Baltic art gallery as well as a cut in backing for high profile events like the Great North Run.

 Coun Henry, who is on the board of both the Sage and the Baltic said the cuts haven’t come as a surprise to them as last year the council outlined plans for a 30% reduction over two years.

They recognise the need to become less dependant on public funding if they can,” he said.

Speaking about the situation overall, he commented: “I’m extremely concerned, however we just have to get on with it.”

There is a possibility it might have to revise its figures at the end of the year when the council will find out how much it will receive from the Government in the Local Government Finance Settlement.

We’re not holding our breath about that,” said Coun Henry. “Hopefully there won’t be any surprises. Assuming it doesn’t get any better we’ll be making the decision on the budget in the New Year which will be set in mid February.”

He said he was hoping the public and the trade unions representing workers at risk would get involved in the consultations.

We’re trying to talk through why we’re having to make these savings and what is the best way of doing this. We’ve started to make progress.

“We need to make people realise just how serious it is. It is a double whammy with its effect on the local economy and people’s lives.

“I’ve been in council for 28 years, during the famous days of Thatcher and we’ve never experienced anything like this.”

Source –  Newcastle Evening Chronicle, 04 nov 2014