Tagged: fly-tipping

Fly-tippers cost South Tyneside Council £200k

Illegal rubbish dumpers cost  South Tyneside more than £200,000 in one 
year, new figures have revealed.

New fly-tipping statistics show that the local authority dealt with 6,934 incidents in the 2013/14 financial year, costing South Tyneside Council – which is facing making £22 million in cuts – a total of £228,822.

The Department for Environment Food and Rural Affairs figures show this was the cost of investigating fly-tipping, cleaning up and issuing warning letters.

The cost of investigations alone was £120,747.

Coun Tracey Dixon, lead member for area management and community safety at South Tyneside Council, said:

“It is disgraceful that people think they can dump their rubbish in our borough.

“Fly-tipping is irresponsible and can be hazardous to the public and wildlife, particularly if targeted by arsonists. Not to mention it is unsightly and costly to clean up.”

 “We take the issue extremely seriously and are working closely with South Tyneside Homes to take a proactive approach to enforcement against environmental issues in our communities.

“This includes training more officers to issued Fixed Penalty Notices. We also encourage people to report incidents they come across and appeal for people to take details of any vehicles and the people involved, if they can.

“We will always take action against anyone who we can identify as being responsible for illegally abandoning waste across the borough and have a 100% success rate for taking action through the courts.

“It doesn’t matter if it is one bin bag of rubbish in a back lane or large quantities of waste dumped at the roadside, fly-tipping is a criminal offence and we will not tolerate it.”

Full story : http://northstar.boards.net/thread/162/tippers-cost-south-tyneside-council

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Three Middlesbrough Labour candidates reported to police for ‘false statement’ on election leaflet

As the election looms ever closer another political row has broken out – with the Middlesbrough Labour Party now reported to both the police and the Electoral Commission.

Three Labour councillor candidates – including the leader of Middlesbrough Labour Party Charlie Rooney – have been reported for the alleged publishing of a false statement about Independent mayoral candidate Andy Preston.

 Mr Preston has been reported to the police and Electoral Commission regarding putting his parents’ Middlesbrough address on his nomination form.

The latest complaints regard Labour councillor candidates for Longlands and Beechwood Charlie Rooney, Jacinta Skipp and Theresa Higgins and a political leaflet that has been circulated across the Saltersgill area of Middlesbrough.

In it, they state that Mr Preston owns a piece of land on Saltersgill Avenue – the former Gospel Hall site – that they describe as “disgraceful”, suggesting that this shows he treats communities with “utter disdain” and claim that Labour candidate Dave Budd is the best man to be the town’s mayor.

Mr Preston said he has not owned the land since last year.

Cllr Rooney said they have issued a retraction leaflet clarifying Mr Preston no longer owns the land but did so at the time of the complaints to Middlesbrough Council.

The police complaint refers to Electoral Commission guidance stating that “It is an illegal practice to make or publish a false statement of fact about the personal character or conduct of a candidate in order to affect the return of a candidate at an election.”

Under the Representation of the People Act 1983, there are criminal penalties in place for those convicted of making or publishing false statements about election candidates.

Copy of original Labour leaflet sent out by Charlie Rooney, Theresa Higgins and Jacinta Skipp. Independent mayoral candidate Andy Preston has reported them to the police and Electoral Commission for saying he owns a piece of land in Middlesbrough where fly-tipping occurred when he says he no longer owns it
Copy of original Labour leaflet sent out by Charlie Rooney, Theresa Higgins and Jacinta Skipp. Independent mayoral candidate Andy Preston has reported them to the police and Electoral Commission for saying he owns a piece of land in Middlesbrough where fly-tipping occurred when he says he no longer owns it

Mr Preston said:

“This is getting ridiculous. The smear campaign against me has gone beyond stupid now and I’m getting really angry.

“This is just the latest grubby little instalment of the ongoing campaign to undermine me.

“My genuine advice to all the other candidates is to take a deep breath, come up with some decent ideas for the town and start talking to voters. Basically, they should stop slagging me off and focus on their own campaigns.”

Regarding the police complaint, Mr Preston added:

“A quick internet search would have revealed that I am not the owner of the land, nor have I been for some time.

“The statement that I own the land was not only false but deliberately designed to cost me votes and impact the outcome of the mayoral election – perhaps it already has.

“At a time when I have faced ridiculous and puerile allegations about minor paperwork anomalies, it’s important that this rather more serious matter should be looked into by the police.”

A spokeswoman for Cleveland Police said:

“We received an allegation of electoral malpractice. Any information provided to us will be assessed to see what, if any, offence has been committed.”

A spokeswoman for the Electoral Commission said it was a criminal matter and would have advised the complainant to report it to the police.

A Labour Party spokesperson said:

“Mr Preston has complained about comments made concerning the state of land on Saltersgill Avenue.

“We have put out a leaflet in the area affected by these repeated blights, providing residents with clear and accurate information.

“We all want a better environment and that means everyone taking responsibility for it. This means businesses, the council and individuals taking responsibility for the properties and land they own and carrying out proper maintenance and not letting the area be spoiled for everyone else.”

Source – Middlesbrough Evening Gazette, 27 Apr 2015

Community action : Horden residents plan to take over running of dozens of empty homes

Residents of a former colliery community plan to take over the running of dozens of boarded up homes themselves.

A total of 160 homes out of 361 properties managed by Accent housing association stand empty in East Durham – 130 of them in Horden, near Peterlee.

They have become a magnet for antisocial behaviour, fly-tipping and rat infestations.

Horden residents decided to act after Accent announced it was seeking a “programme of disposal”, with a Government minister suggesting last week they could be flogged off for as little as £1 each.

Accent has blamed the controversial bedroom tax for contributing to the low demand for the homes, but residents argue it is the failure to invest in the properties which has made them undesirable.

At a packed meeting convened by the Horden Colliery Residents’ Association (HCRA)  on February 18 backed the formation of a community association with the view to acquiring and renovating the properties.

HCRA spokesman John Barnett said:

“Over the many years Accent have invested little or nothing on the properties.

“Although Accent claims the bedroom tax is to blame, we believe it is the lack of investment and the state they have allowed the streets to degrade into that has put people off. The appearance of all the boarded up houses is devastating.”

“What we want to do as a community is tackle the environmental aspects and make streets more attractive and then renovate those properties.”

Residents have approached community housing expert Jo Gooding to help them examine the options.

Accent is hoping many of the homes will be purchased by would-be homeowners under a homesteading initiative, subject to approval by the Homes and Communities Association.

Claire Stone, Accent’s director of communities and assets, said:

“We have worked really hard to find the best possible solution for these homes and have had a dedicated project team in place with Durham County Council and the Homes and Communities Agency to explore all the options.

“We had hoped that other social landlords with stock in the area would take them on, but unfortunately this has not proved possible.

“We have therefore reluctantly decided to dispose of the properties as they fall empty. We will continue to work closely with residents and local representatives to ensure that they are fully supported throughout this process.”
Source – Northern Echo,  20 Feb 2015

Easington MP warns empty County Durham homes blight former mining communities

Some of the run down and boarded up houses in the Horden area
Some of the run down and boarded up houses in the Horden area

Nearly 200 homes in east Durham communities have been left empty and boarded up – encouraging crime and damaging the quality of life for their neighbours, an MP has warned.

Easington MP Grahame Morris urged ministers to intervene as he warned that large numbers of homes in Horden and Blackhall, in his constituency, had been allowed to fall into disrepair.

Speaking in the House of Commons, he said social housing provider Accent had allowed properties to fall into disrepair through lack of investment and by failing to vet new tenants properly.

 

Mr Morris also warned that changes to housing benefit had meant properties went empty, because they had two bedrooms but were occupied by single people – who had become liable for the bedroom tax.

He won a promise from Local Government Minister Brandon Lewis to look into the problems faced by the villages.

The minister also said he would ask the Homes and Communities Agency, the official body which regulates social housing providers, to meet Mr Morris to discuss his concerns.

Leading the debate, Mr Morris said the villages’ problems followed the closure of Horden colliery in 1987, which among other things led to a decline in the local population over time.

 

Accent managed 361 properties in Horden and Blackhall, Mr Morris said. But 130 of its 220 homes in Horden were currently empty, as well as 30 of the 141 properties in Blackhall.

He warned: “The problem is that, as properties become empty, Accent no longer seeks to let them as homes. Instead, vacant properties are being boarded up, which are an eyesore and a drain on the community.

“It is clear, from walking around the area, that properties have gradually fallen into a state of disrepair and now require substantial work.”

 

Proposals to improve the homes had been scrapped following the introduction of the bedroom tax, he said, because the only way to ensure the homes were occupied had been to rent them to single people, and this was no longer possible.

But Mr Morris said that local residents complained Accent had not taken good care of its housing stock for many years before the bedroom tax was introduced.

He said: “It seems to have total disregard for the community in terms of vetting potential tenants.

“The residents’ groups, who have worked closely with the local authority and the police, have been out litter picking, clearing up fly-tipping and identifying problems to report to the local authority. However, the residents say that their efforts to clean and improve the area have been undermined.”

The result had been crime, antisocial behaviour, fly-tipping and rat infestations in the empty homes.

 

The MP urged the minister to ensure the Government invested in the village to improve the housing stock, to replace high-density colliery housing with more modern housing.

One option could be an approach known as “homesteading”, in which homes are sold at a substantial discount to buyers who then spend money to improve the properties, he said.

However, Mr Morris said some public funding would be needed. He told the minister: “I understand that we are in a time of austerity, but if there is a political will, we can overcome any barriers on finance.”

Mr Lewis said:

“He painted a sobering picture of a town struggling with empty homes and the damaging impact that that can have on the wider community. Horden is in one of the most beautiful corners of the country. I appreciate that, having visited the north-east in the past few weeks.”

He added:

“We need to see beautiful places such as Horden thriving, but we must also ensure that we fix the broken market so that they can deliver on that.”

Claire Stone, Accent’s director of communities and assets, said:

“We have worked really hard to find the best possible solution for these homes and have had a dedicated project team in place with Durham County Council and the Homes and Communities Agency to explore all the options. We had hoped that other social landlords with stock in the area would take them on, but unfortunately this has not proved possible. We have therefore reluctantly decided to dispose of the properties as they fall empty. We will continue to work closely with residents and local representatives to ensure that they are fully supported throughout this process.

“As a responsible social landlord, we need to ensure that our stock is fit for the future. We are under an obligation to secure the best possible value for money for all of our residents into the future and our robust asset management strategy has identified that these properties are not sustainable for us as a social landlord.”

Newcastle Evening Chronicle, 12 Feb 2015