Tagged: emergency food

More than 4,500 Hartlepool families get emergency supplies from foodbanks as cases increase

Thousands of Hartlepool families have been given vital help following heartfelt pleas to a foodbank.

Hartlepool Foodbank gave 4,222 people three days of emergency food in 2014-15, compared to 4783 in 2013-14.

The figures included 1,147 children getting help from the foodbank.

Bosses at the foodbank, which is one of 400 nationally run by the Trussell Trust, have praised communities for helping the cause, which saw people in Hartlepool donate 38 tonnes of food.

 The foodbank was also boosted by 50 people to volunteered to help others.

The top three reasons for foodbank referrals were benefit delay 33 per cent, low income 25 per cent and benefit changes 11 per cent.

A spokesman for the Trussell Trust said:

“Thanks to the generous donations from members of the public Hartlepool Foodbank is often able to provide some basic toiletries in addition to the emergency food, to families who are at struggling point, as well as signposting them to other services in the local area.

“Many Trussell Trust foodbanks, including Hartlepool Foodbank, are partnering with other agencies to provide additional services such as welfare advice, budgeting help and debt support from their premises, helping people to break out of crisis.”

Nationally last year 1,084,604 people – including 396,997 children – received three days’ food from the Trussell Trust’s network of foodbanks in 2014/15, compared with 913,138 in the 2013/14 financial year, an increase of 19 per cent.

Trussell Trust UK foodbank director Adrian Curtis said:

“Despite welcome signs of economic recovery, hunger continues to affect significant numbers of men, women and children in the UK today. It’s difficult to be sure of the full extent of the problem as Trussell Trust figures don’t include people who are helped by other food charities or those who feel too ashamed to seek help.

Adrian Curtis added: “Trussell Trust foodbanks are increasingly hosting additional services like debt counselling and welfare advice at our foodbanks, which is helping more people out of crisis. The Trussell Trust’s latest figures highlight how vital it is that we all work to prevent and relieve hunger in the UK. It’s crucial that we listen to the experiences of people using foodbanks to truly understand the nature of the problems they face; what people who have gone hungry have to say holds the key to finding the solution.”

Source – Hartlepool Mail,  23 Apr 2015

Food Bank Use Soars To More Than ONE MILLION, Says Trussell Trust

Record numbers of starving people are turning to food banks to help feed themselves and their families, shocking new figures reveal.

More than one million people received three-days worth of emergency food from the charity Trussell Trust in the year 2014/15, compared to more than 900,000 in the previous year.

The figures published by the Trussell Trust, supported by the Faculty of Health and Children’s Society, reveal the unquestionable reality of food poverty in Britain today – and the plight faced by so many families struggling to make ends meet.

A total of 1,084,604 people were given food parcels by the charity in the last year, including 396,997 hungry children – up 19% from 2013/14.

Meanwhile, the total number of food banks launched by Trussell Trust rose by just 5%, quashing claims made by some government ministers that rising food bank use is linked to the increased availability of ‘free food’.

Source: Trussell Trust
Source: Trussell Trust

Benefit delays and sanctions remain the largest driver of food bank use, but the figures also suggest that there has been a significant rise in the number of people on low-incomes requiring food aid.

Low-income referrals to Trussell Trust food banks, just one of many charities and organisations supporting the poorest in society, has grown by 20% since 2013/14.

The number of people citing benefit delays and changes as the main reason for turning to food banks has decreased slightly from 48% to 44%.

Source: Trussell Trust
Source: Trussell Trust

Referrals due to sickness, homelessness, delayed wages and unemployment have also increased slightly.

According to Trussell Trust, 10,280 tonnes of food were donated by the public last year.

A recent survey of 86 food banks provided greater clarity as to why people are turning to food banks. The main reasons given were low income, delays in benefit payments, sanctions and debt.

Mother of two, Susan says:

“I have an 18 month old son and an eight year old stepson, I work part time as a teacher and my husband has an insecure agency contract.

“There are times when he doesn’t get enough hours of work, and we really struggle to afford food and pay the bills. The food bank meant we could put food on the table.”

Trussell Trust UK food bank director Adrian Curtis said:

“Despite welcome signs of economic recovery, hunger continues to affect significant numbers of men, women and children in the UK today.

“It’s difficult to be sure of the full extent of the problem as Trussell Trust figures don’t include people who are helped by other food charities or those who feel too ashamed to seek help.”

Trussell Trust draws attention to the tragic story of a mum who was skipping meals to feed her children. “There are people out there more desperate than me. I’ve got a sofa to sell before I’ll go to the food bank”, she says.

“It’s a pride thing. You don’t want people to know you’re on benefits.”

Adrian Curtis continues:

“Trussell Trust food banks are increasingly hosting additional services like debt counselling and welfare advice at our food banks, which is helping more people out of crisis.

“The Trussell Trust’s latest figures highlight how vital it is that we all work to prevent and relieve hunger in the UK.

“It’s crucial that we listen to the experiences of people using food banks to truly understand the nature of the problems they face; what people who have gone hungry have to say holds the key to finding the solution”

Marcella, a former dental assistant recovering from a spinal operation, was helped by a food bank and said:

“It’s so hard to pay rent and survive at the moment. I have friends who are working minimum wage jobs who have had to go to food banks.

“People should not just be surviving, they should be able to live and have a life. I was less than surviving when I went to the food bank.

“Going to a food bank was very emotional for me, I felt a bit ashamed at not being able to support myself but they took the pressure off, they gave me advice and helped me to find a support worker.

“The food bank gave me faith that there are people who understand and who you can trust. We need to stop judging people and listen to every individual and understand how they got into the situation.”

Dr John Middleton, Vice President of Faculty of Public Health said:

“The rising number of families and individuals who cannot afford to buy sufficient food is a public health issue that we must not ignore.

“For many people, it is not a question of eating well and eating healthily, it is a question of not being able to afford to eat at all.

“UK poverty is already creating massive health issues for people today, and if we do not tackle the root causes of food poverty now we will see it affecting future generations too.

“The increased burden of managing people’s health will only increase if we do not address the drivers of people to food banks.”

Over 90% of Trussell Trust food banks provide additional services alongside food to help people out of crisis long-term.

Source –  Welfare Weekly,  22 Apr 2015

http://www.welfareweekly.com/food-bank-use-soars-to-more-than-one-million-says-trussell-trust/

Darlington food bank becomes a lifeline for local community

“We are here for the whole community – if anybody needs help, we will be there within 24 hours,” says Joel Likezo, Pastor of the Word of Life International Christian Centre.

After launching in the summer of 2013, the church, on Darlington’s Corporation Road, has become a lifeline for its community, providing help with family issues, fighting extremism and acting as a listening ear for anyone who needs it.

The church has also been working closely with King’s Church to tackle food poverty in the area, and its volunteer run food bank regularly attracts dozens of families needing emergency food and support.

We serve anyone who needs help, regardless of their faith,” says Pastor Likezo.

“There are many families in need and the food bank is here to help them.

“We launched around four months ago and the only down time we had was over Christmas.”

Being nestled in one of Darlington’s most ethnically diverse areas, the food bank not only reaches out to a range of different communities, including Asians and Africans, but a range of religions too.

It stocks a range of food donated by local supermarkets and private donors, as well as halal meat donated by local shops.

 “Many of the Asians here would never go to another food bank,” says Manjang Cham, the food bank’s coordinator.

“A lot of people who come here are Muslims, so we take into consideration about halal food.

“This is the only food bank with multiple nationalities. As a result, I have a good working relationship with people of different faiths.”

Sisters Carol and Judy Barker have been regulars at the food bank for around four weeks.

“Everyone here is really friendly and it is nice to come down to meet people,” says Carol, 54.

“If people need help they should not be scared to come down – people will help you.”

Volunteers at the food bank have also been working with Tracy Freeman, chief executive of homeless charity, First Stop Darlington, to explore ways of expanding the service.

“They are more than just a food bank, they are throwing their doors open to the community,” she says.

 “There is no way of knowing when you might need help. We are just the same people, I am no different to anybody else. Today I can help you, but tomorrow it might be me that needs help.”

The food bank is open every Saturday from 11.30am to 12.30pm.

Donations can be dropped off at the church, or collected by calling 07788-844-226.

Source –  Northern Echo, 19 Jan 2015

Every three minutes – that’s how often Hartlepool’s foodbank is called into action as more families struggle

Hartlepool Foodbank is giving a vital food handout to desperate families an average of every three minutes it is open.

The number of starving people being forced to turn to the foodbank to be able to eat has increased by almost a quarter within a year.

Between January and June this year, 2,310 people walked into Hartlepool Foodbank, in Church Street, and received a three-day food parcel.

The foodbank is open two days a week for a total of four hours and the figure equates to a handout every three minutes.

That is equal to 385 people using the service every month in the period, or 89 people every week.

In the same six-month period last year there were 24 per cent less people needing its help with around 1,750 residents needing a package of food.

The shocking figures prompted Hartlepool Foodbank to launch a Neighbourhood Food Collection at Tesco, in Belle Vue Way, Hartlepool, as part of a national initiative with other stores up and down the country.

And generous customers donated an incredible 7,914 meals for people in need this winter.

The collection was held to make sure that the charities have enough food to help people during the winter, which is the hardest time of year for people in poverty.

Foodbank staff say that Christmas is looking especially tough for people on low incomes, with many already really struggling to make ends meet, and many parents being forced to choose between eating and heating.

Al Wales foodbank manager, said:

“Winter is the hardest time of year for people living in poverty, and this Christmas is looking especially tough as many people on low incomes are already really struggling.

“Numbers of people turning to Hartlepool Foodbank in the first six months of this year January to June increased by 24 per cent compared to the same period last year, and 2,310 people in Hartlepool have been given three days’ emergency food in the first 6 months of this year.”

A Hartlepool Borough Council spokesman said:

“The Government’s welfare reform changes are having a major impact on many local families and we are fully aware of the hardship this is causing.

“The foodbank is playing a vital role in supporting large numbers of people across Hartlepool and since it was opened in 2012 the council has made a number of financial donations to support its work.

“As well as donating food at the Hartlepool Foodbank site on Church Street, residents can also bring items to the Civic Centre reception, during normal office hours, and we will make sure the items are taken to the foodbank on their behalf.”

Foodbank’s Al added:

“Once again the generosity of local people is overwhelming – from children giving their pocket money, to bags and even whole trolley loads for food, being donated.

“Every item counts and helps to make a difference.

“The timing of the collection couldn’t have been better, not only are we stocked for the cold weeks ahead but we are also busy preparing emergency food boxes for our partner agencies to hold over the Christmas period when Foodbank is closed, from December 24 to January 6.

“During the collection, customers were asked to donate non-perishable food items such as long-life milk, cereals, tinned vegetables, tinned meat and Christmas treats.

“Thirty-two volunteers from the Trussell Trust Hartlepool Foodbank joined with Tesco staff in store to collect donations from kind-hearted customers.

“Tesco then topped up all donations by 30 per cent.”

The Tesco collection was part of the fifth UK-wide scheme, in partnership with foodbank charity The Trussell Trust and food redistribution charity FareShare, with an aim of reaching a target of 20 million meals for people in need by the end of this year.

• The foodbank, at 28 Church Street, is open Tuesdays and Fridays from 11.30am until 1.30pm.

For more information contact the foodbank on info@hartlepool.foodbank.org.uk, or telephone (01429) 598404.

Source –   Hartlepool Mail, 08 Dec 2014

More emergency food parcels handed out to people in Gateshead than ever before

Emergency food parcels are more in demand than ever before, according to the latest statistics.

Since opening nearly two years ago, a total of 52 tonnes of food has been handed out to folk in Gateshead in parcels.

More than 100 volunteers have worked around the clock to provide the front-line service to more than 5,000 people, 1,600 of who were children, since opening in 2012.

Statistics show an increase of 27% year-on-year, as 1904 people turned to the food bank this year as opposed to 1649 the previous year.

And secretary of Beacon Lough Baptist Church,  Ian Britton, which  is part of Gateshead Food bank, said the demand for emergency food is growing each week.

“The figures show a steady increase in demand and we are really grateful to the people of Gateshead for their donations and for the people in volunteering.

“We have been able to help 5,000 people in Gateshead who have been helped by the people of Gateshead. It’s very much a community thing. Churches and professionals are working to help people in their time of need.

“The majority of people only receive help from the food bank once and after that professional agencies are able to sort out their problems.”

Figures obtained by organisers show that more people living in Saltwell have used the food bank than anywhere else in the borough, when 408 adults and 153 children from the ward used the service over a two year period.

In Dunston and Teams a total of 541 people were handed food parcels in their time of need.

More than 1770 people used the food bank because of delays of their benefit, while 768 people said they used the service because of changes to their welfare.

Statistics also showed low income and debt were reasons for folk needing help.

Mr Britton added:

“The reality of what we are told by the professionals is that delays and changes to benefits is one of the main reasons for using the food bank.”

The food bank, run by volunteers from churches in Gateshead, works with care professionals, GPs and the Citizens Advice Bureau to distribute food to those families in need in the town. They provide three days of emergency food to people who find themselves in need.

For more information, call 0191 487 0898 or email info@gateshead.foodbank.org.uk

 Source – Newcastle Evening Chronicle, 05 Nov 2014

Latest foodbank figures top 900,000: life has got worse not better for poorest

  • 913,138 people received three days’ emergency food from Trussell Trust foodbanks in 2013-14 compared to 346,992 in 2012-13
  • Figures are ‘tip of the iceberg’ of UK food poverty says Trussell Trust Chairman
  • 83% of foodbanks report ‘sanctioning’ is causing rising numbers to turn to them
  • Foodbank figures trigger biggest ever faith leader intervention on UK food poverty in modern times.

Over 900,000 adults and children have received three days’ emergency food and support from Trussell Trust foodbanks in the last 12 months, a shocking 163 percent rise on numbers helped in the previous financial year. Despite signs of economic recovery, the poorest have seen incomes squeezed even more than last year reports The Trussell Trust, the UK’s largest foodbank network. More people are being referred to Trussell Trust foodbanks than ever before.

That 900,000 people have received three days’ food from a foodbank, close to triple the numbers helped last year, is shocking in 21st century Britain. But perhaps most worrying of all this figure is just the tip of the iceberg of UK food poverty, it doesn’t include those helped by other emergency food providers, those living in towns where there is no foodbank, people who are too ashamed to seek help or the large number of people who are only just coping by eating less and buying cheap food.

“In the last year we’ve seen things get worse, rather than better, for many people on low-incomes. It’s been extremely tough for a lot of people, with parents not eating properly in order to feed their children and more people than ever experiencing seemingly unfair and harsh benefits sanctions.

“Unless there is determined policy action to ensure that the benefits of national economic recovery reach people on low-incomes we won’t see life get better for the poorest anytime soon.”

Read the full story on the Trussell trust website

Source –  Benefits & Work,  03 Nov 2014

http://www.benefitsandwork.co.uk/news/2926-latest-foodbank-figures-top-900-000-life-has-got-worse-not-better-for-poorest

Gateshead mum tells how she was forced to live off emergency food parcels

Tears rolling down her cheeks, mum Katie Friend reveals the true cost of austerity.

In an emotional outburst she reveals the measures she resorted to just to feed her son.

Katie and husband Mal ate tinned casserole and powdered mash potato, while two-year-old Theo unwrapped presents from the charity shop on Christmas Day.

They were later forced to resort to emergency food parcels to give Theo a birthday party to disguise to him they were living on the bread line.

And today, Katie, a trained nursery nurse, tells how the family would have gone hungry if it wasn’t for the volunteers at the Gateshead Foodbank.

The 24-year-old, who now works part-time in a laundry, is telling her story to erase the stigma associated with foodbanks and to help other families in need.

Katie, whose husband has now found a full-time job, said:

“I have been brought up not to ask for help. I come from a proud family and when you’re struggling you just have to get on with it.

“My husband is very much the same but we had to swallow our pride – not just for us but for Theo. He needed food.

“I came down to the foodbank and I was actually shaking. I was terrified, I felt so embarrassed and ashamed and felt like such a bad mum.

“I thought I would come in and find homeless people queuing up. I came in and it was lovely and bright and I was greeted with a smile.

“It was the total opposite of what I thought it was going to be.”

The Friends were plunged into poverty when their benefits were sanctioned just days before Christmas last year.

Katie desperately tried to hide the fact she was struggling until organisers at St Chad’s Community Project noticed something was wrong.

And as she faced Christmas without any food she plucked up the courage to visit Gateshead Foodbank in the centre of Gateshead.

Volunteers provided her with emergency food parcels to get her through the festive period.

She said:

“We were sat having sandwiches. I was sat with my husband and my son cuddled up on the sofa watching the TV. My son opened presents from the charity shop.

“He appreciated them and we had a good day.

“When I think of what somebody else had at Christmas and what we had at Christmas I think it’s hard for somebody to believe that’s what we did.

“Everybody expects everyone can afford to have that day but not everyone can. We would have been able to afford that if we hadn’t have had that sanction.

“I’ll always remember that Christmas, the Christmas we couldn’t afford to have.

“We had tinned casserole and powdered mash potato but we could have had no food. I had a smile on my face on Christmas morning and I wouldn’t have had that if it wasn’t for the foodbank.”

The benefit sanction was lifted after Christmas and Katie and her husband began to get their lives back on track.

But in a second blow – just months later – the family had to resort to handouts when their welfare was recalculated.

And with Theo’s birthday just around the corner and food to find for a pre-planned party Katie received help from the foodbank again.

She said:

“It takes over your whole life. People say your in a dark place but you don’t see anything else going on. When I look back I was really down.

“I had the idea that the foodbank was just for homeless people and we weren’t entitled to anything. People donate the food to help people in your situation and you shouldn’t feel bad.

“It has been given for a purpose, you don’t have to feel bad.

“I’m so glad I swallowed my pride. I wasn’t a bad parent, I was a better parent for providing for my child and getting help.”

She added: “I’m just a normal person and just one of many people that got into this situation.”

The foodbank, which has been open nearly two years, is ran by volunteers from churches in Gateshead. It works with care professionals, GPs and the Citizens Advice Bureau to distribute food to those families in need in the town.

They provide three days of emergency food to people who find themselves in need.

For more information, call 0191 487 0898 or email info@gateshead.foodbank.org.uk

Source –  Newcastle Evening chronicle, 17 Oct 2014

South Tyneside : Homelessness among young is getting worse

Homelessness among young people in South Tyneside is getting worse, a borough charity boss warned today.

Figures released by the South Tyneside Churches Key Project show that the number of local young people presenting themselves to the charity as homeless every month has risen from 20 to 30 to between 30 and 50.

Controversial welfare reforms, including the so-called ‘bedroom tax’, have been blamed for some of the recent sharp rise in local homelessness among young people aged 16 to 25.

The group say more young people are also now relying on emergency food packs to get by.

Key Project chief officer Jean Burnside said: “There is no doubt that homelessness among young people is increasing.

“There are a number of reasons for this: shortage of suitable accommodation for young people, the impact of welfare reforms, particularly the so-called ‘bedroom tax,’ the increase in sanctions and a harsher regime.”

She added: “Debt is another major factor, which impacts on people becoming homeless and relationship breakdown is still the most common reason for young people having no home.

“We have also provided a record number of emergency food packs to young people in need – 380 in the year 2013/14, compared with 247 in 2012/13 and 165 in 2011/12.

“The demand for our services is increasing at the same time that the budget is decreasing.”

KEY Project say there has been an increase in the number of young people under 25 who present as homeless.

Between January 31 2014 and June 20 2014, 150 young people presented as homeless.

Out of 150, 96 of these were male and 54 female.

A further 50 vulnerable young people presented themselves as homeless between June 24 and August 15.

Miss Burnside added: “Initially, we had between 20 and 30 young people present themselves as homeless each month.

“This has increased to between 30 and 50 each month and the age is getting younger.”

The issue has been highlighted ahead of KEY’s annual general meeting on October 10, where the guest speaker will be South Shields MP Emma Lewell-Buck.

The AGM will be held at the Salvation Army Citadel, in Wawn Street, South Shields, on Friday, October 10, at 11am.

Miss Burnside added: “We are delighted that our speaker this year will be Emma Lewell-Buck.

“Since Emma’s election she has campaigned on a number of issues, including opposing the ‘bedroom tax’, calling for action on the cost of living crisis and reform of child protection.”

Source –  Shields Gazette,   02 Oct 2014

Foodbank use on the increase in Sunderland

A Wearside MP has visited a local foodbank to find out more about the help it gives to families.

 Houghton and Sunderland South MP Bridget Phillipson joined volunteers at Loaves and Fishes foodbank in Easington Lane.

She is campaigning for the Government to take action to help families who are struggling to make ends meet after being hit by higher food bills.

A report from the Trussell Trust, which runs foodbanks across the country, said that between April and September 2013 more than 350,000 people, 120,000 of them children, received at least three days emergency food from them – three times more than the same period last year.

Ms Phillipson said: “The cost of living crisis means that those both in and out of work are finding themselves in the same line waiting for their weekly food parcel. It’s not right and the Government need to take action.

“The volunteer staff at Hetton New Dawn Group are supporting the local community during these difficult times. I would encourage as many local people as possible to support them in their work.”

Paul Finch, manager of the foodbank, said: “People are desperate. Naturally, local people want a hand up, not a handout, and it takes a lot for someone to admit they need support because we are proud locally. The economic difficulties we are facing has increased the need for foodbanks. Our volunteers do all they can to support hard hit people and will continue to do all we can.”

Hetton New Dawn Foodbank is open 11am to 1pm on Mondays.

Source – Sunderland Echo  18 April 2014

Food bank referrals in the North East rise 463% in one year

Nearly 60,000 people sought emergency food from the Trussell Trust in 2013-14 compared with just 10,510 in the previous financial year.

Across the country 45% said problems with benefits had driven them to claim, while 20% cited low income. And since April 2010 the total number of referrals in Britain has risen from 61,000 to over 900,000 – up by a factor of fifteen.

Trust chairman Chris Mould called the figures “shocking” and warned things were getting “worse rather than better” for the Northern poor.

He said: “This figure is just the tip of the iceberg of UK food poverty. It doesn’t include those helped by other providers, people who are too ashamed to seek help, or the large number who are only just coping by eating less and buying cheap food.

“It’s been extremely tough for a lot of people, with parents not eating properly in order to feed their children and more people than ever experiencing seemingly unfair and harsh benefits sanctions.

“Unless there is determined policy action to ensure that the benefits of national economic recovery reach people on low incomes we won’t see life get better for the poorest any time soon.”

The figures do not exclude repeat visitors but simply record the number of people cited on vouchers given by jobcentres, doctors and social services to claim food.

They are likely to inflame controversy over the link between food banks and the government’s welfare reforms. Critics claim organisations like the Trussell Trust are becoming an unacknowledged and unpaid part of the welfare system.

Changes since 2012 include raising the minimum jobseekers’ sanction from one to four weeks and the start of the so-called ‘bedroom tax’.

Margaret Nelson, the Trust’s North East spokeswoman, said benefit sanctions were behind much of the rise and that many food bank users were “suicidal” when they came in.

She claimed some had benefits stopped for missing appointments even when they had phoned and been given permission.

A spokesman for the Department for Work and Pensions said: “We’re spending £94bn a year on working age benefits so that the welfare system provides a safety net to millions of people who are on low incomes or unemployed so they can meet their basic needs.

“The OECD say there are fewer people struggling with their food bills compared with a few years ago, benefit processing times are improving and even the Trussell Trust’s own research recognises the effect their marketing activity has on the growth of their business.

“The truth is that the employment rate is the highest it’s been for five years and our reforms will improve the lives of some of the poorest families in our communities by promoting work and helping people to lift themselves out of poverty.”

He cited an ONS survey which found fewer people saying it was “difficult to get by” in 2012 than 2010 and claimed benefit clearance times are “improving year on year.”

And he said: “There is no robust evidence that welfare reforms or benefit administration are linked to increased use of food banks.”

> ?????  How can they not be ?

Tory peer David Freud told the Lords last year that food bank use was driven by “supply”, saying more people were going because the food was free and available.

But a three-year study by Sheffield University this month argued rising demand was to blame, with benefit cuts and sanctions seen as a major cause.

The DWP insists it does not “refer” people to food banks but merely “signposts” them – a distinction not made by the banks themselves.

Meanwhile over 35 Anglican bishops and 600 church leaders will call for “urgent action” from the three main party leaders.

Reverend Mark Bryant, the Anglican bishop of Jarrow, praised food banks’ efficiency and kindness but said society had “seriously got something wrong” to need them at all.

He said: “Something in a region of a third of the people they are helping are simply people whose benefits have been delayed.

“These are not people who are trying to work the system or anything like this. These are people who are entitled to benefits and the benefits system hasn’t delivered on time.

“You go to places like this, and you hear the stories, and you simply come away thinking ‘something isn’t right’. We have seriously got something wrong when people who for a whole variety of reasons are very vulnerable cannot afford either to feed themselves or to feed their families.”

Mr Bryant spoke at Gateshead Food Bank while on a joint visit with the Catholic Bishop of Hexham and Newcastle, Seamus Cunningham.

Source – Newcastle Journal   16 April 2014