Tagged: Dennis Skinner

Hilary Benn shares memories of Durham Miners’ Gala – but says Labour cannot commit to funding the event

Labour figure Hilary Benn has told of fond childhood memories attending Durham Miners’ Gala, but admitted a Labour Government could not offer money for the under-threat event.

The Shadow Communities and Local Government Secretary, whose much-admired father Tony Benn was a fierce defender of the miners during Margaret Thatcher’s time in power, recalled the magic of the Big Meeting when he watched banners pass the County Hotel balcony.

But he said his party, which was founded by the union movement, could not offer cash to back the Big Meeting.

The event was founded by the Durham Miners’ Association and has a long and rich history as a celebration of the region’s heritage.

Tory Communities Secretary Eric Pickles seized on the chance to criticise Labour and accused them of failing to “respect their roots”.

The Gala’s future is uncertain as the association is struggling to find fresh funds, organiser, general secretary of the Durham Miners’ Association Dave Hopper told the crowd in 2014, though it will go ahead on Saturday July 11.

Hilary Benn, who followed his father into a career in Parliament and is campaigning to be re-elected in Leeds Central, said he shared Mr Hopper’s fears for the event.

“One of my earliest childhood memories was my dad taking me up to the Gala,” he said. “There must have been about 11 of us on the famous balcony of the County Hotel, including Harold Wilson.

“We watched the banners go past the hotel in the procession. I was struck by how it was a great day of trade union solidarity and it is a great Labour tradition.”

But it is a sure signal of just how tough times are that the Labour Party can’t offer any money towards the event.

He said: “The Labour and trade union movement have always been big supporters of the Gala, and we will do all we can to support it, but we can’t make specific spending commitments.”

The Miners’ Gala was first held in the city’s Wharton Park in 1871.

Numbers grew strongly during the miners’ strikes to attract huge crowds of as many as 300,000.

Though the North East mining industry is a shadow of its former self, the Big Meeting continues to pull thousands of visitors.

Lodge banners are marched through the city and hundreds gather at a field near banks of the River Wear in what is a proud celebration of the North East’s heritage.

Tony Benn was one of the great figures of the left that have spoken at the event.

Labour Leader Ed Miliband has told colleagues he will give a speech this year, sharing a stage with long-serving parliamentarian Dennis Skinner.

The association said it was left with a £2.2m legal bill after losing a six-year court battle on behalf of former miners who have osteoarthritis of the knee.

Critics, including Labour’s North Durham candidate Kevan Jones, however, say the association had £6m in its accounts when it was a union in 2007.

Mr Pickles said a Conservative Government would not offer any help but insisted the party’s plan to create jobs would see more people support the event.

Mr Benn said one of the things the unions, many of which will be represented at the Gala, will fight is the rise in zero-hours contracts which grew four-fold under the Coalition government.

Mr Pickles, however, said: “As it is predominantly Labour Party and trade union members involved you would expect them to respect their roots.

“What we can promise is more jobs and more prosperity and more pounds in people’s pockets.”

Source –Newcastle Evening Chronicle, 06 Apr 2015

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Zero hours contracts picked apart by union leaders at the Durham Miners’ Gala

Zero hours contracts were picked apart by union leaders as part of a round of speeches at the most popular Durham Miners’ Gala since the 1960s.

The historic event, which is now in its 130th year, attracted thousands of people to its Big Meeting event on Saturday and was blessed with fine, sunny weather.

Long-time Labour MP Dennis Skinner warned corporations of using the controversial zero hours arrangements and took aim at Newcastle United owner Mike Ashley, for employing people on that basis through his company Sports Direct.

Christine Blower, general secretary of the National Union of Teachers also spoke, as well as GMB general secretary Paul Kenny and Prison Officers’ Association general secretary Steve Gillan.

Thousands of people lined the streets of Durham as banners from former mining communities were carried past accompanied by the sound of more than 50 brass bands.

The Chopwell Lodge banner with its striking imagery of Karl Marx and former Russian leader Vladimir Lenin caught people’s attention as usual, while several new banners joined the procession this year.

Organisers from the Durham Miners’ Association said it was the most well attended year since the 1960s, despite ongoing financial worries for future galas.

The organisation faces legal bills of £2.2m following a failed six-year compensation battle for its members through the courts.

While £60,000 was found to run this year’s event through a fundraising drive, association chairman Dave Hopper has previously said there may be difficulties beyond 2015.

However he told the crowd: “Don’t worry. We will be back next year and probably the year after.”

Source – Newcastle Journal, 14 July 2014

Thousands turn out for 130th Durham Miners’ Gala

Thousands of people flocked to Durham City for the 130th Durham Miners’ Gala.

 Warm sunshine helped swell the crowds later in the morning.

About 65 banners from across the North East and elsewhere were joined by 50 bands for the procession to the Racecourse.

Banner numbers were swelled by mini-banners from several primary schools, including West Rainton, and banners from other unions.

Gala Day starts early for many with breakfast meetings in clubs and community centres in the outlying former pit villages.

There was an early start in Houghton for Pat Simmons and the members of the Lambton and Houghton Banner Group.

Their band for the day, from Elland in Yorkshire, was treated to breakfast at the Peppercorn Cafe in Houghton before accompanying the Houghton banner on the first of two processions.

We processed the banner to the war memorial in Houghton before taking it to Durham,” said Pat.

The band played the miners’ hymn Gresford to remember those miners who fought in the First World War.

“Houghton didn’t have a banner for a long time after the old one was lost in a fire in the 1960s.

“This will have been the first time for many years the banner has been taken through Houghton first before going to Durham.”

The Gala attracts not just former pitmen, but also people too young to have worked in the coal industry.

I am only 22 so never worked down a pit,” said Robert Kitching, who was helping to carry the Silksworth banner.

I’m interested in mining and heritage, and this is my fourth year with banner.

“If the Gala is to survive, we have to attract younger people.

“But it is difficult to get them involved.”

Richard Breward, 67, was parading the Easington Lodge banner.

I left school at 15 and worked at Easington for 27 years,” he said. “I did more or less everything there in that time, and I finished when the pit finished in 1992.

“I’m at the Gala every year, and I want to see it continue.”

Guest speakers this year included the ever-popular left wing MP Dennis Skinner, and the general secretaries of four unions.

Further entertainment for the crowds was provided by music, stalls, and a funfair on the Racecourse.

Those for whom the temperature proved too high could cool down with free bottles of water provided by Northumbrian Water.

The good weather was matched by the general good nature of the crowd.

Police reported few arrests by mid-afternoon, although one man was ‘in the cells, drying out’ after jumping into the River Wear.

By lunchtime many people were already heading home, or heading back into Durham for the afternoon Gala Service in the cathedral.

Dave Hopper, general secretary of the Durham Miners’ Association, is determined there will be another Gala next year, and in the years to come.

The cost is increasing each year,” he said. “For example, £26,400 is spent on subsidising the brass bands which are an essential feature of the day.

“The association no longer has subscriptions to its funds from working miners, and it is obvious we cannot fund the Gala indefinitely.

“But I am confident there are sufficient friends in County Durham and elsewhere who want it to continue.”

Anyone wanting contribute to the cost of future Galas can do so online: www.durhamminers.org

Source –  Sunderland Echo, 13 July2014

Failure to back Miners’ Strike strike weakened union movement, says miners’ leader

Labour Party leaders and union chiefs who did not support the miners’ strike in the 1980s helped weaken the movement, a miners’ leader says.

Thousands of people will flock to Durham City on Saturday (July 12) for the 130th Durham Miners’ Gala, which marks 30 years since the start of the bitter dispute.

In his programme notes, Dave Hopper, general secretary of Gala organisers the Durham Miners’Association, says declassified documents reveal that the Thatcher Government was determined “to butcher the coalfields and smash the National Union of Mineworkers.

He praises politicians and unions who supported the strike.

But he continues:“At the same time, these revelations should shame those trade unions and Labour Party leaders who did not support our strike.

“Those who refused to come to our aid bear a huge responsibility, not just for our defeat, but for weakening the whole trade union movement.

“They will be remembered in the former coalfield of Britain just as we remember those so-called leaders who betrayed the 1926 General Strike.

“The refusal of New Labour, during 13 years of government, to repeal the anti-trade union legislation, which was used to defeat us, only compounds their shame.”

 Mr Hopper goes on to say that the “lack of a radical alternative” is turning hundreds of thousands of people off politics and that he believes Labour would regain support if it campaigned “with passion and commitment”to reverse privatisation.

Five new banners will be on display at the Gala – Fenhall Drift Mine, Lanchester; St Hilda Colliery, South Shields; New Brancepeth Colliery, County Durham; a UNITE Community Membership Banner and West Rainton Primary School’s Adventure Pit banner.

The parade through the city to the racecourse will start at about 8.30am.

There will be a funfair, various stalls and entertainment, including folk singer Benny Graham, on the field throughout the day.

Speeches will be made between 12.15pm and 2.30pm.

The speakers are Bolsover Labour MP Dennis Skinner, Paul Kenny, general secretary of the GMB, Prison Officers Association general secretary Steve Gillan, NUT general secretary Christine Blower, and Mick Whelan, general secretary of ASLEF.

Mr Hopper says Labour leader Ed Miliband was “sounded out” about attending the Gala, but nothing had been heard from him.

The blessing of banners service in Durham Cathedral starts at 3pm.

Delegations from Germany, Ukraine and Ireland are expected to attend.

Details, including events marking the strike anniversary, are at http://www.durhamminers.org

Source –  Durham Times,  10 July 2014

Durham Miners’ Gala will be tinged with sadness following deaths of Bob Crow and Tony Benn

The 130th Durham Miners’Gala will be tinged with sadness following the deaths of two leading figures of the Labour movement.

The event, on Saturday, July 12, is set to draw thousands of people to the city centre to watch the parade of banners and brass bands.

Tony Benn and Bob Crow, who died within days of each other in March, were popular speakers who appeared several times at the Big Meeting.

Mr Benn, the former veteran Labour MP who renounced his hereditary peerage, spoke at 20 Galas and also attended when he was not one of the speakers.

Mr Crow, general secretary of the RMT transport union, delivered a call from the platform at last year’s Gala for unions to form a new political party to fight for their interests.

Labour leader Ed Milliband once declined a Gala invitation because he didn’t want to share the platform with a “militant’’union leader.

Dave Hopper, secretary of the Durham Miners Association, which organises the event, said: “We will be saying goodbye to those comrades.

“Gresford (the miners’ hymn that is always played at the Gala) this year will have a special significance because we have had a number of funerals of good comrades.”

 One of the Gala’s most popular speakers, Dennis Skinner, the Labour MP nicknamed the Beast of Bolsover, will return to the platform.

The 82-year-old former miner, who is renowned for his wit and entertaining speaking style, last addressed the event in 2011.

The line-up is completed by GMB general secretary Paul Kenny and Gala first timers Mick Whelan, general secretary of the rail union ASLEF, Steve Gillan, general secretary of the Prison Officers’ Association, and Christine Blower, general secretary of the National Union of Teachers.

Mr Hopper added: “We have a delegation of miners coming from the Ukraine and we are hoping one of them will say a few words about the very troubled and dangerous situation in that country.”

For details of the Gala and events in the run-up to it visit http://www.durhamminers.org

Source –  Durham Times, 02 July 2014