Tagged: community centres

Almost one in five North East kids do not get enough to eat during school holidays, survey reveals

North East teachers say they worry about the health of nearly two in five pupils when they return from school holidays because they are not given enough to eat.

Research by Kellogg’s also found that while holidays should be a fun time for families, term time breaks put an extra burden on the food budget of 27 per cent of parents in the region – with 17 per cent of parents struggling to feed their children three meals a day.

Of the 39 per cent of teachers who say there are pupils in their school that do not get enough to eat over the school holidays, more than a third of staff notice children returning to class with signs of weight loss and 43 per cent have seen a noticeable difference in their readiness to learn when they return for the new term.

And 30 per cent of North East teachers think offering holiday clubs at their school would ensure that children get fed properly, while 67 per cent believe they would give the added bonus of providing children with extra learning opportunities over the summer.

Adrian Curtis is director of the Trussell Trust Foodbank Network, which has two sites in Newcastle, one in Gateshead and one in Durham.

He said: “These are sad statistics when children spend 170 days out of school compared to 190 days in the classroom.

“School holidays are especially difficult for low income families whose children usually receive free school meals or support from breakfast clubs. Many are deeply concerned about being able to feed their children over the long break, and may resort to skipping meals to feed their children.”

He added: “Last year we saw foodbank usage in August increase by over a fifth compared to the same time in June, before the holidays began, and we expect this year’s figures to reflect a similar trend.

“On top of the existing work foodbanks do to help families struggling during the holidays, we have started to partner with companies, like Kellogg’s, to pilot running holiday breakfast clubs for families whose incomes are stretched to breaking point.”

The Kellogg’s Holiday Breakfast Club programme is held in schools, community centres and foodbanks across the UK to provide food and social activities. It is part of the company’s Help Give a Child a Breakfast initiative which aims to feed 80,000 families in need every day.

Katy Luke, manager of Blyth Valley Barnardos children’s centre, said: “We are aware that many families we work with are living in poverty and holidays are expensive for them, even when meeting basic costs not to mention treats which children hope to have on holiday.

“In our centre arrange a programme of activities that are free or low cost and we give families ideas of how to entertain youngster without having to break the bank. We also offer parents help during term time on how to cook healthy family meals on a tight budget.”

Source – Newcastle Evening Chronicle, 22 Aug 2014

County Durham – council cutbacks threaten bowls clubs

Bowls players fear long-established North-East clubs could be forced to close under council funding cutbacks.

Durham County Council has written to club bosses saying it is unable to sustain its current financial support for the 30 public facilities across the county – and asking local enthusiasts to take over running their own facilities “as an alternative to closure”.

But club bosses say the £5,000 they say they have been offered as a one-off payment to cover start-up costs such as buying machinery is nowhere near enough and their ageing members are unable to do the manual work needed to maintain their greens and pavilions.

Bowls is vital to keeping pensioners active and socially engaged, they argue, with the 30 clubs having hundreds of elderly members between them.

One club leader, who asked not to be named, said: “It’s terrible. We pay our rates and some of that goes to leisure.

“To ask someone in their 70s to cut greens two or three times a week, the health and safety would never have it.

“Everybody’s upset and thinking their club could fold. For the smaller clubs, there’s no way they’re going to stay open.”

The cash-strapped council is facing Government funding cuts of more than £200m and Simon Henig, its Labour leader, has repeatedly said every service must be reviewed.

In the letter to bowls clubs, Nigel Dodds, the council’s strategic manager for culture and sport, says it is unable to sustain financial support for what is a non-statutory, or optional, service and aims to save £146,605 from spending on greens and pavilions.

The council manages around half of the bowls facilities across the county and, since the letter went out, two summits have already been held to discuss their future.

Consultation will continue until September, although clubs considering taking over running their facilities have been asked to express an interest by today (Monday, June 30).

The council hopes to reach “in principle” decisions by the end of August and have new arrangements in place by next spring.

Terry Collins, the council’s corporate director for neighbourhood services, said consultation was ongoing and no decisions had yet been made.

The authority would provide business advice and planning, Mr Collins added, and consider making start-up grants.

Early feedback has been encouraging with many clubs receptive to the proposals as they have an understanding of the difficult financial decisions the council is having to make and also have a desire to see the clubs continue to operate.

“The solutions may include local partners or clubs working together,” he said.

Previously, the council has handed over the running of leisure centres, community centres and a golf club to volunteers.

Source – Durham Times,  30 June 2014