Tagged: Colin Race

Labour MP Helen Goodman: ‘Immigrants on building sites should speak English’

Immigrants working on construction sites should be able to speak English, a North MP has said.

Helen Goodman, Labour MP for Bishop Auckland, said it is vital immigrants have a “reasonable understanding” of the language so health and safety isn’t put at risk.

The Shadow Welfare Reform Minister said some of her constituents have “completely fair” concerns about immigration and insists Labour would address them.

I think people have legitimate concerns,” she said. “They are also concerned about people not being able to speak good English.

“These are totally fair and totally reasonable concerns. On a building site you do need to have a reasonable understanding of English for health and safety purposes.

“You are working in a team and everybody needs to be able to understand what you say. If you go to the A&E department you want to speak to someone who can speak English.

“That is completely reasonable and fair.”

The Bishop Auckland constituency is home to just 800 non-UK nationals (of a total 89,500), which equates to just 1%.

In County Durham overall, there are 13,700 non-UK-nationals in County Durham (2.7%).

The MP’s words come after Bishop Auckland Mayor Colin Race defected from Labour to Ukip.

She said people are worried about the impact on wages and immigrants claiming benefits that will be wired overseas.

In general, people think that some immigration is good, particularly for things like high-skilled work in the NHS, but they want more controls,” she said.

They want reassurance that a Labour government would control immigration better and so I tell them that we will re-establish checks on the borders for people coming in and going out.

“The really big thing people are worried about is the impact on jobs and wages. They feel that people from Eastern Europe are prepared to work for less than they are and that some employers are exploiting that and that this pushes down wages.”

> Are they really prepared to work for less ?  Or could it be they see the apparant size of UK wages compared to those at home and it looks good, but they fail to take into account that costs – housing, food, everything – are also higher ?

And then they find themselves here working for less, but paying out more.

She added: “Labour plans to raise the minimum wage and to stop employers recruiting overseas while not offering jobs to local people. I think people are right to be concerned and they want us to tighten up. We will tighten up.

> How about UK citizens  working abroad ? Shouldn’t their jobs have been offered to local people too ? What’s going to be done about that ?

“I think it is fair that people want us to say that people aren’t allowed to claim benefits for children overseas.”

The Labour MP also took a swipe at Ukip, led by Nigel Farage, for being “all over the place” on policy and being anti-women.

They are a bit of a one-man band,” she said. “I suppose that the other long-standing parties, by definition, have to make the difficult decisions.

“Farage still benefits from being the new kid on the block. Once you get past the Europe issue, they are all over the place.

“They seem to change their policies regularly.”

She added: “I think they are very conservative with respect to women.

“In their eyes, women should have a very certain place. They want to take us back to the 1950s with respect to women.”

Source –  Sunday Sun, 15 Feb 2015

Can UKIP and the Green party win in the North East?

The forthcoming general election has been described as one of the most unpredictable in generations.

And with the polls revealing Labour and the Conservatives to be neck-and-neck, the result could depend on how well the so-called minor parties perform.

For some time now this has largely meant UKIP which has enjoyed a level of success in the North.

Now it also means the Green party which has seen its membership surge of late reportedly to a higher level than that of UKIP.

So will either of them manage to win seats here or perhaps gain sufficient votes to affect the final outcome?

Political expert Dr Martin Farr of Newcastle University said Labour was most at threat from the rise of UKIP while the Greens posed a threat particularly to the Lib Dems.

Dr Farr also said the support in the North East had given UKIP a certain amount of credibility.

“Before it had been portrayed as the party of disgruntled Tories, the anti-immigration party.

“But the North East is Labour’s heartland and immigration isn’t as big an issue here as it is, say, in the North West.

“The issue here is about representation which many former Labour voters don’t think they are getting from the party.

“Meanwhile UKIP can say what it likes at the moment as it is a party untarnished by being in Government.

“What it is offering is what Labour used to offer – clarity and certainty.”

This could explain why UKIP has enjoyed notable electoral successes up here recently.

At present it has a North East MEP, Jonathan Arnott, and four local councillors, two in South Tyneside and two in Hartlepool.

 

At the 2013 South Shields by-election following David Miliband’s resignation, UKIP’s Richard Elvin came second to Labour’s Emma Lewell Buck winning 24% of the vote, with the Tories and Lib Dems a distant thrid and fourth.

And, if the UK didn’t have a first past the post electoral system, it could have many more representatives.

In the May 2014 local elections at Newcastle City Council, having never contested a ward before, UKIP put up candidates in 19 and nine came second in the vote.

Its overall share of the vote was 9,231 or 13.5%, ahead of the Conservatives although trailing Labour and the Lib Dems.

Meanwhile at Sunderland City Council, UKIP put up five candidates in 2012 and although none won, it got some notable numbers in Hetton in particular with 1,363 where their candidate came a close second.

In 2014 it was unlucky not to win any seats despite gaining 16,951 votes in total, a 24.3% share. Of the 23 wards it contested it came 2nd in 16 of them.

Even as we approach the general election it is still making inroads. Last month the Mayor of Bishop Auckland, Coun Colin Race, quit the Labour Party and joined UKIP.

As for the Greens, Dr Farr said:

“There has been a huge surge in support because the Lib Dem support has collapsed and they are also attracting people from the left of Labour who are fed up with austerity.

“There isn’t a Syriza type party (the left wing anti-austerity party in Greece which formed the last Government there) in the UK.

“The Green party is basically still a pressure group without fully formed policies on all the issues. It’s leader was embarrassed recently in a TV interview because of this.”

However he said in time, using the success it has had at local level in places like Brighton, it could achieve credibility at a national level.

This might mean any electoral success it enjoys in the region by be more limited than UKIP which, in the public’s eye, is a bit more of an established party.

Overall Dr Farr said he wasn’t expecting many surprises at the May general election.

He said: “I think in most of the North East, the majorities are such that the numbers they attract won’t be enough to win seats.”

Source – Newcastle Evening Chronicle, 07 Feb 2015

Labour Mayor of Bishop Auckland Colin Race defects to UKIP

The Labour Mayor of Bishop Auckland has defected to UKIP.

Councillor Colin Race, who says he has voted Labour “ever since he was old enough”, made the shock announcement at a Bishop Auckland Town Council meeting, in County Durham, on Tuesday.

Coun Race said he will be joining Nigel Farage’s party before pouring scorn on his former Labour colleagues for being part of a “cosy consensus” of politicians.

Coun Race said: “Year-on-year it has become increasingly clear that Labour are neglecting voters and taking us all for granted.

“The Labour Party that I once knew – the party that stuck up for the working families, is no more. We have a cosy consensus of politicians in Westminster who spend more time patting each other on the back, than representing the people who pay their wages at the end of the month.

“Here in the North East we have the highest rates of unemployment in the country, how are my kids meant to get a job when our political class support open door mass immigration from 27 other EU member states?”

> But its not immigrants who are cutting full time jobs and replacing them with short hours or zero hours jobs. That’s the real problem, not immigration. Still, sounds like UKIP’s his natural home.

Coun Race’s defection comes four months before Labour MP Helen Goodman fights to keep the Bishop Auckland constituency red.

UKIP’s North East MEP, Jonathan Arnott, said:

“I would like to take this opportunity to welcome the Mayor of Bishop Auckland, Coun Colin Race, to UKIP’s peoples’ army.

“Labour party members across our region are simply realising that the incredibly wealthy individuals who sit at the top of the Labour party don’t, and make no attempt to, work for hard-working, law-abiding citizens across the country.

“Only UKIP are offering a sensible, credible alternative to the Labour party who have neglected the North East for years.”

> Don’t forget the Green Party, who have the added bonus of not being racist.

It is understood Coun Race attempted to stand for Labour on Durham County Council but was rejected as a candidate.

Labour hit back at the councillor’s criticism and branded UKIP “more Tory than the Tories”.

A party spokesman said:

“On the day Nigel Farage confirmed his plans to privatise the NHS, people in Bishop Auckland will rightly be questioning the decision of one of their town councillors.

“UKIP’s policies include another tax break for millionaires, higher taxes on working families, scrapping rights as at work and higher bankers’ bonuses.

“They can’t be described as a party who will stand up for working people. In reality they are more Tory than the Tories.”

Source – Newcastle Evening Chronicle, 20 Jan 2015