Tagged: City of Durham

County Durham General Election Candidates

Bishop Auckland: currently held by Helen Goodman (Labour)

Christopher Fraser Adams (Con),

Rhys Burriss (Ukip),

Helen Catherine Goodman (Lab),

Thom Robinson (Green),

Stephen Charles White (Lib Dem)

 

City of Durham: currently held by Roberta Blackman-Woods (Labour)

Roberta Carol Blackman-Woods (Lab),

Liam Finbar Clark (Ukip),

Jon Collings (Ind),

Rebecca Mary Louise Coulson (Con),

Jonathan Elmer (Green),

John Eric Marshall (Ind),

Craig Martin (LD).

 

Easington: currently held by Grahame Morris (Labour)

Luke Christopher Armstrong (LD),

Jonathan William Arnott (Ukip),

Steven Paul Colborn ( Socialist Party of Great Britain)

Chris Hampsheir (Con),

Susan McDonnell (North East Party),

Grahame Mark Morris (Lab),

Martie Warin (Green).

> It’s good to see that Steve Colborn is still fighting on. His letters in the local press are always worth reading. I can honestly say that if I lived in Easington he’d get my vote.

 

North Durham: currently held by Kevan Jones (Labour).

Malcolm David Bint (Ukip),

Laetitia Sophie Glossop (Con),

Kevan David Jones (Lab),

Peter James Maughan (LD),

Vicki Nolan (Green).

> I’m almost sure Laetitia Glossop is a character in a P.G. Wodehouse novel ?

North West Durham: currently held by Pat Glass (Labour)

Pat Glass (Lab),

Charlotte Jacqueline Louise Haitham Taylor (Con),

Bruce Robertson Reid(Ukip),

Mark Anthony Shilcock(Green),

Owen Leighton Temple (Lib Dem)

 

Sedgefield: currently held by Phil Wilson (Labour)

Stephen Patrick Glenn (LD),

John Paul Leathley (Ukip),

Greg William Robinson (Green),

Phil Wilson (Lab),

Scott Wood (Con).

Newcastle East constituency one of the worst places in the UK for voters falling off the electoral register

A Newcastle constituency is one of the worst in the UK for voters falling off the electoral register.

In the last year more than 9,000 potential voters have dropped off the list in Newcastle East, with only Cardiff Central and Liverpool Riverside having worse figures.

A spokesman for the BiteTheBallot campaign group which is fighting to get more people on the electoral register before the May general election said the figure was “an absolute disgrace”.

The controversial switch from household to individual electoral registration has caused a great deal of problems for local authorities whose electoral registration officers are continuing to run into problems with their electoral management software systems.

The number of people on the register has dropped yet the Government and the Electoral Commission don’t have a plan to deal with this and it’s extremely worrying,” said the BiteTheBallot spokesman.

It was revealed last week that local authorities had been given an extra £20m in a bid to solve this.

However the spokesman was dismissive of the move, saying it would be spent mostly on sending out letters.

He said: “It’s about getting people into the community to engage with them and get them interested in politics and registering for the vote.”

The spokesman revealed the group has a Community Engagement Officer, Megan Patterson, who is working with Durham County Council and visiting local schools, sixth form colleges and youth clubs.

“She is doing stellar work in getting people registered. It’s labour intensive but it works.”

According to the Office for National Statistics there were 58,557 people registered to vote in Newcastle East as of December 2014.

This is an 13.8% decrease on the 67,945 people who were registered to vote in the constituency on December 1, 2013, the third biggest decrease for any of the 591 parliamentary constituencies in England Wales and Northern Ireland.

The ONS estimates there are 84,394 people aged 18 and above living in Newcastle East which means that only 69.4% of the potentially eligible voting population is in fact registered to vote.

However this percentage is likely to be higher as the population estimates also include people who are not eligible to vote such as those born overseas.

Ironically not far behind Newcastle in numbers falling off the electoral register is City of Durham where the BiteTheBallot community engagement officer is working.

It has seen an 11.5% drop in the year from 73,036 to 64,614.

Across the whole of Tyne and Wear, Northumberland and County Durham there was a fall of 3.8% in the number of people registered to vote with declines in all but one constituency.

Source – Sunday Sun, 01 Mar 2015

Tory website leak reveals list of “non-target” seats

The Conservatives appeared to write off their chances in a swathe of North-East constituencies, in a leak on the party’s own website.

Eight seats in the region are described as “non target” for the May general election, suggesting little effort will be put into trying to win them.

Unsurprisingly, the eight include some ultra-safe Labour seats where the Tories are miles behind, including North Durham (12,076 votes), North West Durham (9,773) and Sedgefield (8,696).

In others, the Conservatives were in third place in 2010, so face an even bigger mountain to climb in May, in City of Durham (14,350 votes behind) and Redcar (13,165).

However, the list also includes Darlington, where Labour’s Jenny Chapman finished just 3,388 votes ahead of her Conservative opponent five years ago.

Furthermore, Darlington was a Tory seat until it was lost by Michael Fallon – now the Defence Secretary – at the 1992 general election.

Ms Chapman said: “I am surprised. They need to change their attitude, because this is the kind of high-handed assumption that drives voters away from politics.”

But Peter Cuthbertson, the Conservative candidate in Darlington, said: “I think there’s every chance of victory – I’m picking up enthusiasm for change in Darlington.

“I have seen this list, but I have not had any communication with my party about it, so I don’t know whether it is true.”

Asked what help he was receiving from Conservatives headquarters, Mr Cuthbertson said: “It’s down to local people to muscle their own resources. I’ve got no expectation that they will campaign for me.”

Stockton North is also on the list, although Labour’s majority is only 6,676, as is York Central (6,451), where sitting Labour MP Hugh Bayley is standing down.

Other constituencies are described as “non target” because they have big Tory majorities, including Richmond (23,336) and Thirsk and Malton (11,281).

The blunder occurred when a staff member at Conservative HQ uploaded the photographs of hundreds of Tory candidates, of which 112 were categorised as “non target”.

 The leak implied the party had also given up on Rochester and Strood, where the MP Mark Reckless deserted the Tories and won a by-election for Ukip last year.

The mistake was later corrected, but not before the list was recorded by a freelance journalist, who published the information.

Source –  Northern Echo,  12 Feb 2015

North East economic development partnership is ‘barely functional’ claims MP

The economic development agency responsible for backing 40,000 businesses across the North East has been criticised for not having a chief executive three months after its previous leader announced he was leaving.

The lack of leadership at the North East Local Enterprise Partnership (LEP) means it is “barely functional”, an MP has claimed.

City of Durham MP Roberta Blackman-Woods told the Commons that the failure of the LEP was undermining efforts to bring more jobs to the region, though it last night insisted it was working hard to create more and better jobs.

The agency has not begun considering candidates to replace Edward Twiddy, a former deputy director at the Treasury who became the LEP’s chief executive but announced in mid-April that he was quitting in order to join a new digital bank.

The LEP is currently overseen by Helen Golightly, the chief operating officer, and chairman Paul Woolston, a former senior partner at PwC North East.

Along with neighbouring LEP Tees Valley Unlimited, the North East LEP was set up by the Coalition government to replace the regional development agency.

Ministers said the new organisations would be more local and led by businesses, allowing them to help the local economy.

But Labour MPs such as Mrs Blackman-Woods opposed the abolition of the regional development agency, and warn that the new bodies lack resources.

Speaking in the House of Commons, she also criticised a flagship Government scheme called the Regional Growth Fund, which provides grants to businesses. Up to £109m in funding allocated to the North East has not yet been handed over to firms,

The last Labour Government had encouraged firms such as Hitatchi to invest in the region, she said, adding: “There is a real contrast between all that under Labour and having a local enterprise partnership in the area that is barely functional – it does not have a chief executive or even a deputy chief executive at the moment – and a regional growth fund that operates a scattergun approach.

“Most of the money allocated to the region is not drawn down in any case. According to a recent report by the National Audit Office, most of the funds remains unspent, while the cost of creating jobs has increased considerably, but Ministers are taking no action to tackle this set of concerns.”

LEP chair Paul Woolston said: “Creating more and better jobs for the North East remains our top priority. We have set some ambitious targets and are working hard to achieve these.”

He added: “Through our North East Investment Fund we have provided around £38m loan funding to projects across the North East with an additional £30m of funding anticipated in the next year.

“We were chosen to develop one of three skills pilots in the country which will implement a new skills funding model, and we are currently recruiting for innovation board members to help establish the North East as an exemplar in smart specialisation and open innovation.

“Whilst we are in the process of recruiting for a new chief executive, following the departure of Edward Twiddy last month, our chief operating officer Helen Golightly is providing strong leadership, working closely with board members and partners to drive forward our plans for economic growth.

“We recognise there is still a lot to do, but we are on the right track and I am confident that we will succeed.”

Source –  Newcastle Journal, 12 June 2013