Tagged: candidates

Green candidate predicts surge for her party in South Tyneside

A Green surge is predicted in South Tyneside at the general and local elections in May as the party confirmed it was putting up candidates in every borough ward for the very first time.

 Shirley Ford, who lives in South Shields, was the Green Party candidate in the town at the 2010 General Election.

On that occasion she attracted 762 votes – 2.1 per cent of the poll, finishing a distant fifth behind the victor, Labour’s David Miliband.

But the political climate has changed dramatically in the five years since.

 Her party in particular has seen a surge of popularity and Mrs Ford believes she has every chance of polling in double figures on Thursday, May 7.

The administrative assistant at Marine Park Primary School in South Shields is also convinced that the candidates set to represent the party across all 18 wards in the borough are the most diverse.

She said:

“We are going to have a full slate of candidates. I can confirm that.

“We’ve been delighted at the interest generated and the number people who have come forward, many for the first time.

“Our candidates range from young people – students and apprentices – to people who are retired, from people working in health, in education and those working in environmental science.

“I’m not claiming we have the youngest candidate because I know Labour has a particularly young representative in Hebburn, but I can’t imagine any party has such a diverse range of candidates.”

Mrs Ford believes the Green input in a series of local issues has helped raise the party’s profile.

As an example she cited its intervention against Harton Technology College applying for academy status.

The Greens’ efforts to stage clean-ups in the town’s “rather unlovedReadhead Park and create a ‘friends of the park’ group there have also improved the public perception, Mrs Ford says.

She added:

“Attracting more than ten per cent of the vote is, I believe, a realistic goal.

“It was difficult in the past when we had only a handful of local candidates and a much smaller membership base and we were running a much less ambitious campaign.

“We had a great response at the Westoe by-election last October and that has continued since.

“Tony Bengtsson will once again be our candidate there and the reaction when knocking on doors has been very positive. There is no predicting this election. The opinion polls suggests there are many people undecided on how to cast their vote.

“There can be a Green surge and even if we don’t win a ward, second finishes would leave us in a very good position.

“It’s something we could build on in future campaigns.”

The other candidates standing in South Shields are: Gita Gordon (Liberal Democrat); Emma Lewell-Buck (Labour); Robert Oliver 
(Conservative); and Norman Dennis (UKIP).

Source – Shields Gazette, 13 Mar 2015

Green Party set to triple its number of North East parliamentary candidates as membership grows

The Green Party is set to triple its number of candidates standing for Parliament in the North East this General Election.

In 2010, the party fielded seven candidates but this May it will field 25  as support for its campaign grows in the region.

So far, the party has put forward 14 candidates and members are in the process of selecting a further 11.

Broadcasters have so far refused to include a spokesman in the upcoming TV debates ahead of voters going to the polls in May despite the fact the Green Party has seen membership rise by 120% to 40,879.

The Lib Dems’ membership stands at a reported 44,576, while Ukip says it has 42,500 members.

The party will be fielding seven candidates in County Durham constituencies, 10 in Tyne and Wear, five in Teesside and three in Northumberland.

Prime Minister David Cameron has declared he will not take part in a TV debate unless the Green Party is also invited.

> Only, one susposes, because he suspects the Greens will draw in any Labour supporters who still harbour socialist principles. Labour don’t seem at all keen to allow them airtime, so they probably think so too.

Well tough – Labour has lost support of people like myself since they became pale blue under Blair, and Milliband just compounds the problem – not because he looks a bit weird alledgedly but because he really has nothing new to offer – more austerity ? Gee, thanks Ed – enjoy your MPs 10% pay rise.

No doubt if the Greens did become a major party they would over time become just as corrupt and dysfunctional as the other main parties, especially if career politicians of no obvious convictions saw them as a way into power. But in the meantime, where else do those of us who would rather cut off our hands before we voted UKIP register our protest vote ? And they do at least have some policies that generate a little ray of hope that some party may have ideas that look beyond  years more of austerity.

The North East regional party coordinator, Shirley Ford, who is standing for the Greens in South Shields, said to have so many candidates is a sign of confidence amongst the party ranks –

“The party has pledged to stand in at least 75% of constituencies and we are determined to exceed that in the North East. We really want to give everyone the chance to vote Green in the General Election.

“The way our membership and supporter numbers are rocketing, we are optimistic that we will be able to do that.

“With local parties right across the region blossoming, we are confident we can raise all the deposits and funds for campaigning. And one key way we are doing this is by crowdfunding, with some local parties having already fully funded their candidates’ deposits.

“We rely on the commitment and dedication of our members and supporters to raise the money we need.

“We are receiving requests all the time via email, Twitter, Facebook and when we’re out campaigning, for us to stand candidates.

“People want to be able to vote for a party that has the policies to tackle the economic, social and environmental crises we face.

“More and more people are recognising that the Greens stand for making real bold change for the common good.”

Source – Newcastle Evening Chronicle, 15 Jan 2015

Racism and bigotry scare people from standing for Parliament, MPs warn

Women, people with disabilities and ethnic minorities may be put off taking part in Britain’s political system because of abuse or threats of physical attacks, a North East MP has warned.

Sharon Hodgson, Labour MP for Washington &  Sunderland West and the Shadow Equalities Minister, said attempts to make councils and Parliament more representative were being undermined by fears that candidates would face discrimination.

And she said that every party had to act to stamp out intimidation and prejudice in politics.

She was speaking as the Commons debated the findings of an inquiry which found candidates standing for election need protection from racist, Islamaphobic and anti-semitic attempts to smear them.

The findings were published by the All-Party Parliamentary Inquiry into Electoral Conduct.

Jeremy Beecham, who led Newcastle City Council  for 17 years and is now a Labour peer, revealed that he had faced anti-semitic campaigning from political opponents when he first stood as a councillor in the city in 1967.

The inquiry also highlighted the case of Parmjit Dhanda, a former Labour MP, whose children found a severed pig’s head outside his house after his election defeat in 2010.

Gay rights group Stonewall highlighted a number of incidents of homophobic behaviour by candidates from many parties including an example from 2007 in which a Labour party council candidate with parliamentary ambitions, Miranda Grell, labelled her opponent a paedophile.

Ms Grell was convicted in 2007 by magistrates in Waltham Forest of two counts of making false statements about another candidate.

Mrs Hodgson told MPS: “None of us goes into politics without the fear of attack, and none of us is immune from attack on some level; but we should always expect any attacks on us to be based on choices or decisions that we have made, the things we have said, the way we have voted, or what we have done.”

But she warned: “I am sure that for many candidates the threat of their skin colour, background or faith – not to mention their children’s or relatives’- being turned into smears or innuendo or leading to harassment or abuse such as we have heard about today is a real consideration. I worry that the fear I have described will mean that many excellent candidates never seek their local party’s nomination or get the chance to be elected.”

The number of MPs in the House of Commons from ethnic minority backgrounds has increased. After the 2010 General Election there were 27 minority ethnic MPs, 12 more than in the previous Parliament.

It means 4.2% of MPs are from an an ethnic minority compared to 17.9% of the UK population as a whole.

The 2010 census of local councillors in England, carried out by the Local Government Association, showed that 4% came from an ethnic minority background, compared to 20% of the English population as a whole.

Equalities Minister Helen Grant said: “The inquiry on electoral conduct was thorough and detailed and made recommendations to a number of bodies, including the Electoral Commission, the police and political parties. Building its findings into current work and guidance and working with the right organisations is the best way to ensure that political life becomes a battle of ideas, not of race hate and discrimination.”

Source –  Newcastle Journal,