Tagged: Brighton Pavilion

Green Party launches 2015 General Election Manifesto

The Green Party today launched ‘For the Common Good’, the Party’s 2015 General Election Manifesto (1), which sets out a bold, ambitious plan for a fairer society and safer planet.

The manifesto focuses on the Greens’ commitment to restoring and extending public services and tackling climate change.

Climate change is the greatest challenge of our time and only the Greens are determined to tackle it by taking serious action to limit our emissions at home and fighting for a fair global deal that secures humanity’s shared future. The Green Party will invest up to £80billion over the next Parliament in renewable generation and energy efficiency.

Real action on climate change will create jobs, reduce energy bills and make life better for ordinary people.

The Green Party stands for a fair economy that works for all and will end austerity and restore the public sector, creating over one million good jobs that pay the Living Wage.  The Green Party will introduce a Wealth Tax on the top 1%, a ‘Robin Hood Tax’ on the banks and crack down on tax dodging to raise £75billion a year by 2019.

The Green Party will take back our health service by reversing the creeping privatisation of our NHS and increasing health spending by £12billion a year. Healthcare must be publicly funded and free at the point of use.

The manifesto was launched by Natalie Bennett, Green Party Leader of England and Wales, and Caroline Lucas, who was elected as MP for Brighton Pavilion in 2010.

Bennett said:

“Austerity has failed and we need a peaceful political revolution to get rid of it.

“Our manifesto is an unashamedly bold plan to create a more equal, more democratic society while healing the planet from the effects of an unstable, unsustainable economy.

“This manifesto presents the Green Party’s genuine alternative to our tired, business-as-usual politics. We desperately need a more equal society and the policies we announce today pave the way towards a brighter, fairer future for all.”

Lucas said:

“We urgently need real leadership when it comes to tackling climate change – and that’s what our manifesto delivers.

“From ending the scandal of cold homes to investing in a public transport system that puts the public first, our plans will make a positive difference to people’s lives, create new jobs and help protect our environment.

“We have put investing in a greener future at the heart of our manifesto and only Green MPs will demand Parliament delivers change that reflects the scale of the climate problem.”

 

https://www.greenparty.org.uk/manifesto

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Green Party is set to stand candidates across the North East for the first time

The Green Party is set to field more than three times as many candidates in the North East as in 2010, in a further sign that the smaller parties could play a key role in the general election.

And the party has turned to an “crowdfunding” website where supporters, or anyone who want to help, are urged to contribute small sums of money to help pay the cost of deposits.

One candidate is even offering donors rewards such as a sketch or a personalised poem if they help to fund his campaign.

It follows the success of the Greens in winning support from one in 20 voters in the region in the European elections last year, placing them almost level with the Liberal Democrats.

The party had just ten candidates in the region in 2010.

But it expects to have candidates in 25 seats on May 7.

However, standing for election can be an expensive business – particularly for a party without funding from big businesses or trade unions.

To help raise the £500 deposit which every candidate needs, the Greens have turned to a website called crowdfunder.co.uk which allows anybody to contribute sums, typically of £5 or more, to a cause.

In return, donors will receive a reward which varies from candidate to candidate.

Michael Holt, who hopes to be the Green Party candidate for Hartlepool, is offering to draw a sketch for backers who donate £5, write a personalised poem for £10 or record a song, on the subject of the donor’s choosing, for £30.

Other candidates are offering more conventional rewards. Donors backing the campaign of prospective Tynemouth candidate Julia Erskine can receive a badge or a mug.

The fundraising has a serious purpose – to allow the Greens to take part in May’s General Election in a way that hasn’t happened before.

It comes amid speculation that the traditional three parties – Conservatives, Labour and the Liberal Democrats – could lose ground to parties such as UKIP, the Greens and, in Scotland, the SNP.

One opinion poll published this week found that Labour had 27 per cent of the vote in the North of England while Conservatives were on 22 per cent, UKIP on 14 per cent, Greens on seven percent and Lib Dems on four per cent.

The North East has not traditionally been the most fertile ground for the Greens, who have one MP, representing Brighton Pavilion.

Brighton and Hove Council is also the only council controlled by the Greens, as a minority administration. London, the south east and south west each have one Green MEP.

But the party believes it could pick up support in the North East and is campaigning on a series of local issues across the region. In Northumberland they are opposing hydraulic fracturing, or fracking, and they are also working with residents concerned about planned open cast mining at Druridge Bay.

Greens in Newcastle and Gateshead are campaigning to protect the green belt. Greens have also opposed the closure of the Jarrow NHS walk-in centre in South Tyneside.

Shirley Ford, North East organiser for the Greens and the party’s organiser in South Shields, said:

“The party has pledged to stand in at least 75% of constituencies and we are determined to exceed that in the North East. We really want to give everyone the chance to vote Green in the General Election. The way our membership and supporter numbers are rocketing, we are optimistic that we will be able to do that.”

“With local parties right across the region blossoming, we are confident we can raise all the deposits and funds for campaigning.

“And one key way we are doing this is by crowdfunding, with some local parties having already fully funded their candidates’ deposits. We rely on the commitment and dedication of our members and supporters to raise the money we need.”

What they stand for:

In line with the other parties, the Green Party has not yet published its General Election manifesto. The party says that its manifesto published last year for the European Elections provides a good guide to what it believes.

Policies include:

  • Opposing austerity and instead creating jobs by investing in a low carbon economy
  • Scrapping the welfare cap
  • A new tax on bankers bonuses
  • Stopping the “privatisation” of the National Health Service
  • Bringing schools such as academies and free schools back under local authority control
  • Bringing rail franchises back into public ownership
  • Scrapping the high speed rail line known as HS2

> The Green surge in the North East is interesting because formerly UKIP were claiming to be the alternative vote in the region for disillusioned Labour voters.

I suspect that the Greens are now becoming the alternative to UKIP being the alternative (if that makes sense). Certainly you’d like to hope that any ex-Labour or Lib Dems with principles would vote Green rather than UKIP and its pathetic policies.

Source –  Newcastle Evening Chronicle, 14 Feb 2015

Greens Pledge 500,000 Social Homes By 2020

The Green Party has committed to building 500,000 social rented homes by 2020 to tackle the current housing crisis, it has been announced today.

‘Urgent action is required to address the housing crisis that sees 1.8million people on waiting lists for social housing, while ‘ghost mansions’ lie empty’, say the Greens.

Just 5% of Government expenditure is spent on building more affordable homes, which the Greens have described as a ‘disgrace’.

 Families are being priced out of parts of London and other areas due to a lack of social rented homes and ‘skyrocketing private rents’.

According to the Greens, 30,000 social homes have been lost to Right To Buy since 2010 – with only a few replacements.

The Greens in Government would build 500,000 social rented homes by gradually increasing the housing budget from £1.5bn to £6n by 2017. This would be paid for by reforming landlord tax allowances, scrapping buy-to-let mortgage interest relief and removing local authority borrowing caps.

The Green Party’s Manifesto will include policies to address the housing crisis, including policies to bring empty homes back into use, a better deal for private tenants, ending Right To Buy, and action on rent levels.

Natalie Bennett, Green Party Leader, said:

“We need to move away from regarding houses as primarily financial assets and go back to regarding them as homes. This policy is an important step in that direction.

“Landlords have been receiving massive public subsidies through tax breaks and housing benefits, and this is contributing to the rising, unsustainable level of inequality in our society.

“They do not deliver enough of social and economic benefit to the rest of society to justify their favourable tax treatment: it isn’t in the interests of our common good to continue this bias towards the wealthy at the cost of those struggling to survive with high rents and often low-quality housing.”

Tom Chance, PPC for Lewisham West and Penge and Green Party Housing Spokesperson, said:

“Social housing has provided decent, affordable homes for millions of people over the past 150 years.

“After 40 years of sales, demolitions and budget cuts, the Green Party will put social housing back at the heart of housing policy.”

Caroline Lucas, Green Party MP for Brighton Pavilion, added:

“In my Brighton constituency the cost of buying a home is 44% higher than the average. That’s pushing my constituents into debt, into poor quality rented housing, and into homelessness.

“There’s no silver bullet that will magic away years of failure by successive governments to invest in ending the housing crisis, but increasing the supply of sustainably built social housing, as we are announcing today, will start to make a real difference for tenants, homeowners, and anyone wanting to buy a home.”

Source –  Welfare Weekly,  05 Feb 2015

http://www.welfareweekly.com/greens-pledge-500000-social-homes-2020/

Claimant count vs parliamentary majorities

Over a year ago we published an article Could claimants choose the next government? looking at the fact that working age claimants hold the balance of power in enough marginal seats to potentially decide who governs Britain at the next election, and yet they are treated by politicians with such contempt that you might imagine they had no vote at all.

The contempt has not lessened, but with an election just 100 days away the chance for claimants to exercise their influence is drawing near.

Below are series of bar charts, looking at a largely random selection of marginal seats – though most are currently held by the Conservatives and Lib Dems. We have compared the majorities at the next election with the working age claimant count in the constituency.

In some seats, such as East Dunbartonshire, claimants would be hard pressed to single-handedly wrest control from the current MP.

But in many others, such as Cardiff North, claimants have overwhelmingly superior strength of numbers.

The big question now is not whether claimants can make a difference to who wins the general election, but whether they will choose to.

Please feel free to share and publish these images elsewhere.

Amber Valley500

Arfon

Birmingham Yardley

Bradford East2500

Brent Central2500

Brighton Pavillion2500

Brighton500

Broxtowe500

Cardiff North500

Carlisle500

Carmarthen

East Dunbartonshire

Edinburgh west

Hendon500

Lancaster Fleetwood500

Lincoln500

Morecambe Lune500

North warwickshire500

Norwich2500

Plymouth500

Sherwood500

Stockton South500

Stroud500

Thurrock500

Waever Vale500

Waveney500

Wolverhampton SW500

Source –  Benefits & Work, 27 Jan 2015

http://www.benefitsandwork.co.uk/news/2994-claimant-count-vs-parliamentary-majorities