Tagged: Borough road

Sanctioned man who stole to eat is jailed

A man who stole to eat after his benefits were stopped has been jailed.

Ian Mulholland admitted stealing three packets of casserole steak from Sainsbury’s when he appeared at Newton Aycliffe Magistrates Court .

The court heard he stole the meat to eat after changes to his benefits left him hungry.

The 43-year-old drug user, who faces amputation of his legs, apparently spent nine weeks without money when attempting to change benefits to reflect his disability.

He missed out on payments after failing to attend appointments.

Ben Pegman, mitigating, said Mulholland was unable to afford food and, because of his ulcerated legs, was unable to get to the local foodbank.

He added that the recent offending was as a result of his situation.

He is free of heroin and in receipt of methadone but this is not offending to top that up but offending to eat.”

Mulholland, of Borough Road, Darlington, pleaded guilty to stealing the food, worth £12.60, and was sentenced to six weeks in prison.

A suspended prison sentence imposed for a previous offence was also activated, meaning he must spend 14 weeks behind bars.

Colin Bradshaw, the manager of a foodbank operated by Darlington’s Salvation Army, said cases of people stealing to eat were increasing as a result of benefit reform and sanctions.

Major Bradshaw is now calling for the abolishment of benefit sanctioning which sees claimants’ benefits reduced or stopped entirely if they are suspected of non-compliance.

Predicting a Dickensian future, he said:

“Sanctioning is not only forcing people into greater poverty, it is forcing people to take desperate action such as stealing food.

“Around 70 per cent of the 50 to 58 people we help at our Friday night emergency foodbank have been sanctioned – many of them over 50 years of age and all of them desperate.”

Source –  Northern Echo, 22 Oct 2014

Middlesbrough EDL march and counter demonstration pass without major incident

A demonstration by the English Defence League in Middlesbrough and a counter demonstration have passed off (more or less) peacefully, say police.

Over three hundred police officers were involved in the operation, which has been planned for a number of months.

Around 150-200 counter demonstrators gathered, many dressed in red – the home colours of Middlesbrough FC and the workers movement – as a sign of solidarity.

A strong police presence was active around Ayresome Gardens, but counter demo organiser, Lawrie Coombs, said: “Every time the fascists come, we’ll stand together. But we don’t anticipate any trouble.”

Councillor Len Junier was a prominent figure, leading the march onto Linthorpe Road Middlesbrough.

As the crowds gathered he said: “We are lucky in Middlesbrough, we don’t have problems with racism.

“We don’t want the EDL splitting our community. We want to celebrate the diversity in our area. But we don’t want to get in anyone’s face.”

Addressing the crowd before setting off, a Counter demo spokesman told demonstrators to avoid the areas that the EDL were reported to be.

Then the counter demo set off along Linthorpe Road to the sound of drums and whistles.

Len Junier led the march while chanting, “Whose streets?” to which the procession replied, “Our streets!

Passers-by looked on as the march made its way up towards House of Fraser where a series of anti-racist speeches were made.

The words, “We are British, we’re not going anywhere,” were met with applause from the protesters as the EDL gathered just down the Corporation Road.

Around 350 people took part in the EDL demonstration which set off from Corporation Road at around 2pm.

As the crowd set off, turning the corner from Corporation Road onto Albert Road, it wasn’t long before the singing was broken by the sound of a loud bang.

Police were forced to temporarily halt the march after the bang, from what appeared to have been a firework exploding, shocked many bystanders.

Seconds later, a second firework and a glass bottle were thrown from among the EDL crowd.

As it shattered on the footpath outside Middlesbrough Town Hall, at least one woman was injured and was sat at the road side being treated by an EDL first aider – her foot was bleeding.

Before the march, demonstrators had been warned that banners, flags and placards that might incite disorder would be banned along with anything that could be used to cause injury or damage.

Even so, some of the signs held by EDL supporters were openly hostile in their criticism of Islam.

One read: “Islam causes more deaths a day than cancer does.”

Further fireworks exploded as the procession turned onto Borough road.

As the procession passed some Asian men who were standing at the roadside, certain members of the EDL contingent began chanting “Scum, scum scum.”

Then, as the march turned onto Melrose Street, glass bottles and another firework were thrown in the direction of another group of Asian men, one of whom had a child on his shoulders.

Following this police moved the bystanders away from the march and the missiles which were still being thrown.

Mr Hussein, 37, of Southfield Road, was shocked and baffled by the march.

He said: “I’ve lived here all my life, we live a humble life.

“The people in Middlesbrough have never had these problems before and we don’t want them here now.”

Finally, the EDL supporters gathered outside Teesside Crown Court for speaches.

One speaker said: “When will the government admit that there’s an epidemic of child grooming happening right now.

“Street justice, street justice, is far worse than anything the government can do.”

Still on the issue of child grooming, a second speaker said: “Don’t say this is not a race issue.

“The peaceful majority are irrelevant.”

 A total of two men were arrested – one on suspicion of possession of an offensive weapon and one on suspicion for assaulting a police officer.

 Acting assistant chief constable Ciaron Irvine said: “Clearly there has been some disruption in Middlesbrough town centre to allow these demonstrations to take place, and we are grateful to local residents and businesses for their co-operation.

“We have been working with our local communities and partner agencies including Middlesbrough Council for a number of weeks now to ensure people have been aware of the events and have had the opportunity to contact us if they have had specific concerns.”

Police and crime commissioner Barry Coppinger said: “I attended one of the briefings to police officers this morning and have been out around the town centre observing activities. The whole operation has been well planned and in consultation with our local communities and businesses.

“Clearly the priority for the police today has been to facilitate each demonstration while ensuring the safety of the public and I am pleased that the day has passed off peacefully.”

Source – Middlesbrough Evening Gazette,  28 June 2014